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What makes a hero? - Matthew Winkler

What makes a hero? - Matthew Winkler
The Hero Archetype in Literature, Religion, and Popular Culture: (along with a useful PowerPoint presentation teachers can download at this URL: )Maricopa Center for Learning and Instruction (users embark on their own hero's journey): American Masters Lesson from PBS for Teachers on George Lucas, the Power of Myth, and the Hero's Journey: an interactive approach to the Hero's Journey: of course, information about Joseph Campbell's works on the subject, on the Joseph Campbell Foundation site:The Hero With A Thousand Faces Hero's Journey (semi-biographical film): the stories of (a) Odin hanging from the world tree, Yggdrasil, (b) the Buddha seated under the Bodhi Tree, and (c) the crucifixion of Jesus Christ. Do all of these religious episodes follow the pattern of the hero’s journey? Find a comparable story from another continent. Does it follow the hero’s journey pattern?Challenge the paradigm.

http://ed.ted.com/lessons/what-makes-a-hero-matthew-winkler

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The Neiling II House About 30 miles outside of Berlin, Germany the landscape gets a tad rural and monotonous. However, the rugged wilderness setting in this part of the country gave architect Peter Grundmann the chance to create a forest-dwelling that was both minimal in style but contemporary in form; suited to blend in with the landscape, not detract from its surroundings. Dubbed the House Neiling II, it’s comprised totally from glass and wood, including a beautiful glass facade, a handful of homemade furniture and a custom bathroom and kitchen thanks to Grundmann’s collaboration with Thomas Pohl. The motivation for the project surrounds the ideas of an old barn, venturing into the territory of low-cost, prefabricated materials that yield a modern look. Inside, glazed walls and the open floor plan result in a bright living space complimented with brick, and stone interior with plywood furniture that feeds into the home’s rustic and warm aesthetic.

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A host of heroes - April Gudenrath Northrop Frye, working in the field of literature, defined an archetype as a symbol, usually an image, which recurs often enough in literature to be recognizable as an element of one’s literary experience as a whole. Another way of thinking about archetypes is to imagine that in some way it is possible to plot the important aspects of a story onto a graph. If enough points from several stories were plotted a pattern would start to appear. If one then drew a line that approximated the pattern that emerged in the points, that best fit line would be an archetype. No story perfectly matches the archetype, and some stories will diverge from the archetype more than others. Deus Ex Machina Ago TT Any fan of motorcycle culture has heard of the Tourist Trophy racing days of the 1960’s and ‘70s. And we’ll bet those same individuals remember the name of Giacomo Agostini, winner of 13 Grand Prix championships and 10 Isle of Man TT’s during that time frame. Now, in conjunction with MV Agusta, Deus Ex Machina introduces The Ago TT, a tribute to commemorate such a golden era of motorcycle racing, and the riders who competed with style.

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The Heroic Tradition Since the late 1970s Gregory Nagy has taught a Harvard course called “Concepts of the Hero in Classical Greek Civilization,” passing his enthusiasm for the classics on to thousands upon thousands of students. This spring, though, with an adaptation of the course being offered as a HarvardX MOOC (“massive open online course”), he’s likely topped those numbers in one swoop—and it’s not too late for you to join in. The course, now titled “The Ancient Greek Hero,” is a survey of ancient Greek literature focusing on classical concepts of the hero and how they can inform our understanding of the human condition. We at HUP are quite pleased to be publishing a companion volume, The Ancient Greek Hero in 24 Hours, perfect for those who prefer their learning a bit less massive and not so plugged in.

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