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Greek Mythology

Greek Mythology
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Roman mythology Roman mythology is the body of traditional stories pertaining to ancient Rome's legendary origins and religious system, as represented in the literature and visual arts of the Romans. "Roman mythology" may also refer to the modern study of these representations, and to the subject matter as represented in the literature and art of other cultures in any period. The Romans usually treated their traditional narratives as historical, even when these have miraculous or supernatural elements. The stories are often concerned with politics and morality, and how an individual's personal integrity relates to his or her responsibility to the community or Roman state. Hindu mythology Hindu mythology is a large body of traditional narratives related to Hinduism as contained in Sanskrit literature (such as the epics like Mahabharata and Ramayana, the Puranas, and the Vedas), Ancient Tamil literature (such as the Sangam literature and Periya Puranam), several other works, most notably the Bhagavata Purana, claiming the status of a Fifth Veda and other religious regional literature of South Asia. As such, it is a subset of Indian and Nepali culture. Rather than one consistent, monolithic structure, it is a range of diverse traditions, developed by different sects, people and philosophical schools, in different regions and at different times, which are not necessarily held by all Hindus to be literal accounts of historical events, but are taken to have deeper, often symbolic, meaning, and which have been given a complex range of interpretations.[1] Sources[edit]

Greek mythology Greek mythology is explicitly embodied in a large collection of narratives, and implicitly in Greek representational arts, such as vase-paintings and votive gifts. Greek myth attempts to explain the origins of the world, and details the lives and adventures of a wide variety of gods, goddesses, heroes, heroines, and mythological creatures. These accounts initially were disseminated in an oral-poetic tradition; today the Greek myths are known primarily from Greek literature. Archaeological findings provide a principal source of detail about Greek mythology, with gods and heroes featured prominently in the decoration of many artifacts. Geometric designs on pottery of the eighth century BC depict scenes from the Trojan cycle as well as the adventures of Heracles.

The Mystery of the Ancient Roman Tunnel to Hell There is a place on the northern shore of the Bay of Naples that has long been steeped in history, mystery, myth, and magic. Known as the Phlegræan Fields, it is a desolate place; a barren wasteland strewn with rubble and intersected by deep underground vents that belch out choking fumes and fire. Legends and strange phenomena cling to this hellish, smoke-wreathed landscape, so it is perhaps no wonder that these fields are a location believed since ancient times to hold a tunnel that leads to Hell itself. The Phlegræan Fields is a plateau that is part of an ancient volcanic caldera not far from Mt. Vesuvius, the volcano known for laying waste to the once great city of Pompeii. History of the Trojan War The Trojan War The Apple of Discord The Trojan War has its roots in the marriage between Peleus and Thetis, a sea-goddess. Peleus and Thetis had not invited Eris, the goddess of discord, to their marriage and the outraged goddess stormed into the wedding banquet and threw a golden apple onto the table. The apple belonged to, Eris said, whomever was the fairest. Hera, Athena, and Aphrodite each reached for the apple.

Olympian Gods of Greek Mythology THEOI.COM The Olympian gods ("Theoi Olympioi") presided over ever facet of ancient life and were often grouped according to their common functions. THE THEOI AGORAIOI were the gods of the "agora" (the marketplace and people's assembly). Zeus, as the god of kings and princes, presided over the the assembly, alongside Athena, as goddess of wise counsel, Dike (Justice), Themis (Custom) and Calliope (Eloquence). The gods of the marketplace, on the other hand, were led by Hermes, the god of commerce, along with Hephaestus and Athena, the patron gods of artisans : weavers, potters, metalworkers, sculptors, etc. Apollo was another god of the marketplace.

These Were the Gods of Atlantis The majority of researchers who dedicate their time to the mystery of Atlantis come to conclude that... The majority of researchers who dedicate their time to the mystery of Atlantis come to conclude that the kings and masters of Atlantis were the later gods of antiquity in Egypt, Greece, America and northern Europe. This conclusion is based on the assertion that the primeval tribes were so filled with amazement at the abilities of the Atlantean refugees that they regarded and accepted them as divinity. In Greek mythology, Zeus was the godfather of the third celestial dynasty and the son of Cronus and Rhea. The Romans referred to him as Jupiter.

DELPHI: The Oracle at Delphi The Oracle at Delphi The oracle at Delphi is a figure of great historical importance that was, and still is, shrouded in mystery. She spoke for the god Apollo and answered questions for the Greeks and foreign inquirers about colonization, religion, and power. By her statements Delphi was made a wealthy and powerful city-state. The oracle was at the height of power around 1600 B.C. when Greece was colonizing the Mediterranean and Black Seas (Hale), but was stationed in Delphi from 1400 B.C. to 381 A.D. Aether (mythology) In Greek mythology, Aether or Aither (Æthere, Ancient Greek: Αἰθήρ, pronounced [aitʰɛ̌ːr]), also known as Akmon or Acmon in Latin (possibly from the same route as "Acme") is one of the primordial deities, the first-born elementals. Aether is the personification of the upper air.[1] He embodies the pure upper air that the gods breathe, as opposed to the normal air (ἀήρ, aer) breathed by mortals. Like Tartarus and Erebus, Aether may have had shrines in ancient Greece, but he had no temples and it is unlikely that he had a cult. Hyginus ... started his Fabulae with a strange hodgepodge of Greek and Roman cosmogonies and early genealogies.

Heracles Having performed all twelve labours Heracles was now free from any more obligations to Eurystheus. He was left to his own device. Eurytus (Εὐρυτίων), king of Oechalia, was offering his daughter's hand in marriage (Iole, Ἰόλη), if one of the suitors could defeat him or his sons in the archery contest. The Elements: Fire The Ancient Greek Esoteric Doctrine of the Elements: Extended Version © 1999, John Opsopaus The Essence of Fire Each of the Elements is characterized by a dominant and a secondary Power or Quality: Earth is Dry and Cool, Water is Cool and Moist, Air is Moist and Warm, Fire is Warm and Dry.

List of Greek Gods and Goddesses The following list of Greek Gods and Goddesses is a complete list of the major and minor deities of Greek mythology. The list is presented in alphabetical order by Greek name, with commonly alternate names following, including both Roman and Etruscan versions. Some of the more famous heroes and demigods are also included for good measure.

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