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Francetvéducation : La guerre de 1914-1918

Francetvéducation : La guerre de 1914-1918

http://education.francetv.fr/dossier/la-guerre-de-1914-1918-premiere-guerre-mondiale-o10686

Related:  World War 1914-1918Bazar temporaire 14World War 1

World War I (1914–1919): Overview World War I took place between 1914 and 1918. Although the conflict began in Europe, it ultimately involved countries as far away as the United States and Japan. At the time, the English-speaking world knew it as the “Great War”—the term “World War I” was applied decades later. Historians still actively disagree over the fundamental causes of the war. The period leading up to the war was a complex tangle of diplomacy and political maneuvering—many countries debated over strategies and alliances until nearly the last minute—and the first few weeks of the conflict were similarly chaotic and confusing. However, historians agree nearly unanimously about the war’s consequences: World War I led almost directly to World War II and set the stage for many other important events in the twentieth century.

Cape of Good Hope, South Africa. The Most South-Western Point of The African Continent The discovery of Cape of Good Hope — a geographic location with one of the most romantic names in the world — is due to Portuguese navigator Bartolomeu Dias. At the end of the 15th century Portugal was literally obsessed with discovering the seaway to India sending one expedition after another. In 1487 this task was entrusted to Dias. His voyage, as well as his predecessors', was filled with adventures, shooting incidents with local tribes, and threats of mutiny from his crew. Dias ended up sailing only around Africa thinking that if one continues to sail forward, he would arrive to India sooner or later. After coming to this logical conclusion he turned around, and on his way home in May of 1488 he landed at what he thought was the southernmost point of Africa.

Untold Stories of the First World War Photos, letters and other memorabilia It was the war that tore Europe apart – a struggle between the central powers of Germany, Austria-Hungary, Turkey and Bulgaria, against the allied powers of Britain, France, Belgium, Russia, Italy and the USA. No European nation was left untouched – even neutral states felt the impact of the war. But it was the ordinary men and women who were affected the most. How did the first world war actually end? Quiz question: why did the first world war end? We’re about to witness a commemoration in which the human preference for restraint and dignity will be under pressure from the televisual tendency for wittering on without knowledge or feeling. So one crucial piece of knowledge should be, for schoolchildren and for TV presenters alike: how and why did it actually end? Well, on 24 October 1918, with the German army retreating and its discipline disintegrating, the right-wing aristocrats who ran the German navy launched a suicidal mass foray from the base in Kiel, where they’d been holed up. It was quite clear, rebel sailor Ernst Schneider later wrote, that this was to be a “death ride”. But the sailors had other ideas.

Working Women in the First World War World War Two’s Rosie the Riveter is an iconic figure of the era. Tough and capable, she is symbolic of women’s role in the conflict and their much needed work while men were off at war. World War One had no such figure, but equally strong women. First World War internment camps a dark chapter in Canadian history Though the main battles of the First World War were fought across the ocean, back in Canada, there were prisoners and casualties of another kind. In 1914, immigrants from Austria-Hungary, Germany and the other Central Powers were rounded up and locked away in internment camps. More than 8,000 people who considered themselves Canadian were imprisoned for being “enemy aliens.” For many, it’s a dark secret. It wasn’t until Jerry Bayrak was in his 70s that he first learned of his family’s past.

The Drakensberg - Dragon Mountains, South Africa Packing for my first trip to the Republic of South Africa, I didn't bother to research all of its sights beforehand. I thought it would be enough to focus on the most famous ones, such as Kruger National Park, Cape Town, Table Mountain, the Cape of Good Hope, and, of course, Victoria Falls easily accessible by plane, even though it's located outside the Republic of South Africa on the border of Zambia and Zimbabwe. But, as it usually happens during trips, some things become clear only on the spot. Back in Cape Town airport I noticed huge posters with amazing mountain views entitled "The Drakensberg". I automatically switched to my "adventure photographer" mode and started searching Google for the name right away. 15 minutes later I knew that my anticipated week-long vacation on Durban beaches at the end of the trip would be cut short, because only 300 kilometers away from the ocean there was the Drakensberg National Park.

You are the Fleet Admiral of the Navy in WWI what do you do? The Situation You’re the Fleet Admiral of the Navy in World War I. Your ships are being sunk at an alarming rate by the devastatingly effective German U-Boat. The traditional camouflage isn’t working because your environment (sea and sky) changes with the weather.

First world war commemorations: share your stories and images On Saturday 2 August HAHO, running from 10.00 am to 5.00 pm, launched an exhibition of photographs, biographies and other memorabilia of soldiers and others connected with the local area, Hartshill, during WWI. This took place at the Minton Centre, behind Holy Trinity Church, Hartshill, on the Hartshill Road. Alongside others, Reg Edwards, local historian, and HAHO Treasurer, has conducted research into archives, Sentinel files, and hospital records that has led to the exhibition. Rare colour pictures of 1930s Berlin show carefree life in Hitler’s capital before war that reduced it to rubble This collection of rare color photos of Berlin in 1937, taken by Thomas Neumann and uncovered from Norwegian archives, show life in the German capital during a tumultuous decade. They capture scenes in the vibrant city, which was under the iron grip of Adolf Hitler and his Third Reich at the very height of his power. Yet just eight years later the city was in ruins as Russians and Allies occupied it in victory. But at the time these images were taken, Hitler’s Berlin was vibrant.

BBC Schools - Life in the trenches 31 October 2014Last updated at 15:07 Two British soldiers standing in a flooded communication trench during World War One On the Western Front, the war was fought in trenches. Trenches were long, narrow ditches dug into the ground where soldiers lived all day and night. There were many lines of German trenches on one side and many lines of Allied trenches on the other.

Virtual Tour of Cape Town, South Africa Cape Town is one of the most popular cities on the African continent. It is located in the southwestern part of the continent, on the shore of the Atlantic ocean, near the Cape of Good Hope. The history of Cape Town is also that of the entire country: the history of the Republic of South Africa begins in year 1652, when a Dutch seafarer Jan van Riebeeck founded the city of Cape Town. In the trenches of 1914-1918 What were the trenches? Although most of us think primarily of the Great War in terms of life and death in the trenches, only a relatively small proportion of the army actually served there. The trenches were the front lines, the most dangerous places. But behind them was a mass of supply lines, training establishments, stores, workshops, headquarters and all the other elements of the 1914-1918 system of war, in which the majority of troops were employed. The trenches were the domain of the infantry, with the supporting arms of the mortars and machine-guns, the engineers and the forward positions of the artillery observers. Why were the trenches there?

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