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Civil Rights Digital Library

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Finding Aid on the Cold War Compiled by Tim Wehrkamp Contents Preface Introduction Records in Presidential Libraries Comprehensive Subject Matter Records Newsreels and Television Broadcasts Record Group 306 (Records of the United States Information Agency) Still Pictures and Motion Pictures Textual Records Electronic Records Record Group 273 (Records of the National Security Council) Textual Records Records of the Military Textual Records Electronic Records Donated Material Still Pictures Motion Pictures Intelligence Records Textual Records Reconnaissance and Satellite Imagery Foreign Policy Records Textual Records Still Pictures Records of Congress Textual Records Appendix I: List of Record Groups (RG) Cited in Reference Information Paper 107 Appendix II: Sources of Additional Information About Records or Finding Aids Described in Reference Information Paper 107 End Notes Preface NARA's descriptive program comprises a variety of information products. John W.

Civil War Primary Sources Primary Documents by Topic: Most Popular Official Records Addresses & Speeches Acts, Bills, & Orders Military Correspondence & Documents Personal Correspondence & Narratives Prints & Photos Maps Document Collections Getting Started Primary Documents Official Confederate Correspondence Robert E. Lee, Resignation from the United States Army » Voices Remembering Slavery: Freed People Tell Their Stories  The recordings of former slaves in Voices Remembering Slavery: Freed People Tell Their Stories took place between 1932 and 1975 in nine states. Twenty-three interviewees discuss how they felt about slavery, slaveholders, coercion of slaves, their families, and freedom. Several individuals sing songs, many of which were learned during the time of their enslavement. It is important to note that all of the interviewees spoke sixty or more years after the end of their enslavement, and it is their full lives that are reflected in these recordings. The individuals documented in this presentation have much to say about living as African Americans from the 1870s to the 1930s, and beyond.

The Harlem Renaissance: What Was It, and Why Does It Matter? On February 28, 2014, Humanities Texas held a one-day teacher professional development workshop in Austin focusing on the history and literature of the Harlem Renaissance. Professor Cary D. Wintz, Distinguished Professor of History at Texas Southern University, opened the workshop with the following lecture titled "The Harlem Renaissance: What Was It, and Why Does It Matter?"

Our Documents - 100 Milestone Documents The following is a list of 100 milestone documents, compiled by the National Archives and Records Administration, and drawn primarily from its nationwide holdings. The documents chronicle United States history from 1776 to 1965. Complete List of Documents National Art Inventories What are the Inventories? The Inventories of American Painting and Sculpture document more than 400,000 artworks in public and private collections worldwide. The Inventory of American Paintings includes works by artists who were active in America by 1914. The Inventory of American Sculpture has no cut-off date and includes works from the colonial era through contemporary times. These online databases are supplemented by a photographic collection of over 80,000 images.

Library of Congress - Digital Moving Image Collections America at Work, America at Leisure: Motion Pictures from 1894-1915 Work, school, and leisure activities in the United States from 1894 to 1915 are featured in this presentation of 150 motion pictures, 88 of which are digitized for the first time (62 are also available in other American Memory presentations). Highlights include films of the United States Postal Service from 1903, cattle breeding, fire fighters, ice manufacturing, logging, calisthenic and gymnastic exercises in schools, amusement parks, boxing, expositions, football, parades, swimming, and other sporting events.

A New African American Identity: The Harlem Renaissance With the end of the Civil War in 1865, hundreds of thousands of African Americans newly freed from the yoke of slavery in the South began to dream of fuller participation in American society, including political empowerment, equal economic opportunity, and economic and cultural self-determination. Unfortunately, by the late 1870s, that dream was largely dead, as white supremacy was quickly restored to the Reconstruction South. White lawmakers on state and local levels passed strict racial segregation laws known as “Jim Crow laws” that made African Americans second-class citizens. While a small number of African Americans were able to become landowners, most were exploited as sharecroppers, a system designed to keep them poor and powerless. Hate groups like the Ku Klux Klan (KKK) perpetrated lynchings and conducted campaigns of terror and intimidation to keep African Americans from voting or exercising other fundamental rights.

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