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Sam Harris on "Free Will"

Sam Harris on "Free Will"

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pCofmZlC72g

Group Marriage and the Future of the Family With the traditional nuclear family well on its way to extinction, we are faced with a question of critical importance: who will mind the children? Neither two-career nor single-parent families offer children full-time, loving caretakers, and quality day care is both scarce and expensive. Nanny's are a luxury out of reach for most families making up the 99 percent. NETFLIX Netflix uses cookies for advertising, personalization and other purposes. Learn more or change your cookie settings. By continuing to use our service, you agree to our use of cookies. We use cookies (why?). You can change cookie settings; continued site use signifies consent. Close Phantoms in the Brain The writings of Oliver Sacks and others have shown us that we can learn much about ourselves by looking closely at the deficits shown by people with neurological problems. V.S. Ramachandran has seen countless patients suffering from anosognosia, phantom limb pain, blindsight, and other disorders, and he brings a remarkable mixture of clinical intuition and research savvy to bear on their problems. He is one of the few scientists who are able and willing to explore the personal, subjective ramifications of his work; he rehumanizes an often too-sterile field and captures the spirit of wonder so essential for true discovery. Phantoms in the Brain is equal parts medical mystery, scientific adventure, and philosophical speculation. Watch the full documentary now (playlist - 1 hour, 39 minutes)

Science overturns view of humans as naturally 'nasty' Biological research increasingly debunks the view of humanity as competitive, aggressive and brutish, a leading specialist in primate behavior told a major science conference Monday. "Humans have a lot of pro-social tendencies," Frans de Waal, a biologist at Emory University in Atlanta, told the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. New research on higher animals from primates and elephants to mice shows there is a biological basis for behavior such as cooperation, said de Waal, author of "The Age of Empathy: Nature's Lessons for a Kinder Society."

Apple Television, AirPlay and Why the iPad is the new TV Apps Platform - Jeremy Allaire - Voices Ever since the publication of Walter Issacson’s biography on Steve Jobs where he cites Steve as saying that he and Apple had “cracked the code” on TV, there has been insane speculation about Apple’s purported forthcoming TV products and strategy. And appropriately so — Apple’s rise as the dominant global consumer electronics powerhouse for Internet platforms and devices ensures that whatever the company does, it will be transformative for consumers and the TV industry. Much of the speculation has focused on whether a proper Apple Television monitor product would arrive, what size, shape and features it might present, and how it might integrate with Apple’s cloud services. Vitally, the speculation has also dovetailed with a belief that if and when Apple launches a TV (beyond the Apple TV puck offered today) that Apple will attempt to challenge the cable TV industry with a new subscription-based offering for mainstream TV content. Will there be a new TV monitor product?

'At least it'll be exciting': Survivalist made chilling video before killing wife, daughter Video recorded by survivalist Peter Keller reveals his mindset before he killed his wife and daughter then committed suicide. Msnbc.com's Dara Brown reports. By msnbc.com news services BURIEN, Wash. -- Before he killed his wife and teen daughter and retreated to a remote bunker in Washington's Cascade Mountains, Peter Keller recorded a chilling video explaining his mindset: He was bored. "It's getting to the point where just trying to live and pay bills and live as a civilian and go to work, that just freaks me out," the 41-year-old survivalist said in a video clip released Thursday by the King County Sheriff's Office. "It's actually more comfortable for me to think about living out here, robbing banks and pharmacies, just taking what I want for as long as I can.

Group settings can diminish expressions of intelligence, especially among women In the classic film 12 Angry Men, Henry Fonda's character sways a jury with his quiet, persistent intelligence. But would he have succeeded if he had allowed himself to fall sway to the social dynamics of that jury? Research led by scientists at the Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute found that small-group dynamics -- such as jury deliberations, collective bargaining sessions, and cocktail parties -- can alter the expression of IQ in some susceptible people. "You may joke about how committee meetings make you feel brain dead, but our findings suggest that they may make you act brain dead as well," said Read Montague, director of the Human Neuroimaging Laboratory and the Computational Psychiatry Unit at the Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute, who led the study. "We started with individuals who were matched for their IQ," said Montague.

The Benjamin Franklin Effect « You Are Not So Smart#more-1459 The Misconception: You do nice things for the people you like and bad things to the people you hate. The Truth: You grow to like people for whom you do nice things and hate people you harm. Benjamin Franklin knew how to deal with haters. Born in 1706 as the eighth of 17 children to a Massachusetts soap and candlestick maker, the chances Benjamin would go on to become a gentleman, scholar, scientist, statesman, musician, author, publisher and all-around general bad-ass were astronomically low, yet he did just that and more because he was a master of the game of personal politics. Like many people full of drive and intelligence born into a low station, Franklin developed strong people skills and social powers. All else denied, the analytical mind will pick apart behavior, and Franklin became adroit at human relations.

Five myths about marriage The value placed on fidelity — especially male fidelity — has arguably never been higher. In the late 19th century in the United States, an epidemic of venereal disease plagued respectable middle-class wives because so many of their husbands frequented prostitutes. In the 1920s, Somerset Maugham’s play “The Constant Wife” raised eyebrows because its heroine rejects the urging of friends and family to follow convention and ignore her husband’s affair. Primary Psychiatry: In Session with Dennis S. Charney, MD: Resilience to Stress Column Dennis S. Charney, MD, interviewed by Norman Sussman, MD Primary Psychiatry. 2006;13(8):39-41 This interview took place on March 8, 2006, and was conducted by Norman Sussman, MD. Dr. 1. Dangers of Crying It Out Letting babies "cry it out" is an idea that has been around since at least the 1880s when the field of medicine was in a hullaballoo about germs and transmitting infection and so took to the notion that babies should rarely be touched (see Blum, 2002 , for a great review of this time period and attitudes towards childrearing). In the 20 th century, behaviorist John Watson (1928), interested in making psychology a hard science, took up the crusade against affection as president of the American Psychological Association. He applied the mechanistic paradigm of behaviorism to child rearing, warning about the dangers of too much mother love. The 20 th century was the time when "men of science" were assumed to know better than mothers, grandmothers and families about how to raise a child. Too much kindness to a baby would result in a whiney, dependent, failed human being.

Not an Inanity: Special Forces Like SEAL Team 6 Are Indeed Special There is a lot of buzz about SEAL Team 6 and rightly so. Their exploits are typically not well-known outside of the special operations community, but their recent achievement in Pakistan – the killing of Osama Bin Laden – is clearly too newsworthy to hide. SEAL Team 6 is the elite, anti-terrorist group in a special operations community that is already elite. They are penultimate warriors known as “quiet professionals” who move from one mission to the next without the need for acclaim or fanfare. They have expertise in every aspect of armed and unarmed combat and are generally acknowledged as inveterate killers. Why our minds have probably evolved as far as they can go SExpand OK..this is going to sound like I am tooting my own horn...but this is my experience, and all experiences are equally valid right? I have an almost photographic memory. I remember almost everything I pay attention to.

Minds are as clever as they will ever be, say scientists It’s all downhill from here – we are as clever as we are ever going to be, scientists have concluded. If our brains were to evolve any further, it would increase the risk of disorders such as autism. Our grey matter has hit an evolutionary ‘sweet spot’ – with the perfect balance between high intelligence and a balanced personality. But scientists claim that, if our brains did become more advanced, we would be more likely to develop disorders such as autism or synaesthesia, where several senses ‘join together’ and are indistinguishable.

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