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Rome Reborn 2.2: A Tour of Ancient Rome in 320 CE

Rome Reborn 2.2: A Tour of Ancient Rome in 320 CE

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Virtual Heritage - Hadrian's Wall. Brunton Turret Virtual Heritage presents "Hadrian's Wall. Brunton Turret", second Virtual 3D Tour over the most interesting places along the Hadrian's Wall. Brunton Turret (also known as Turret 26B) is one of the best preserved turrets on the line of Hadrian's Wall. It is located east from Roman Cilurnum fort in Chesters, and west from the Onnum fort in Haltonchesters. It was built by soldiers from the ninth cohort of the Twentieth Victorious Valerian Legion (legio XX Valeria Victrix) in 123 AD. Rome city break guide Why go? Because Rome has been around for almost 3,000 years and yet carries all that weight of history with a dolce vita lightness of heart. This is a city where classical ruins and early Christian places of worship stand next to – or lie beneath – Renaissance palazzos and Baroque fountains. There are also great neighbourhood trattorias, quirky shops and a buzzing aperitivo scene. And because Rome is a city that combines the intimacy and human scale of a village with the cultural draws of a European metropolis.

Boudica: scourge of the Roman empire A freedom fighter, the woman who almost drove the Romans out of the country, Boudica is one of the most iconic queens of Britain. Despite being one of the first ‘British’ women mentioned in history, there is no direct evidence that she even existed. Instead, we have to rely on the accounts of two classical authors, Tacitus and Cassius Dio, both writing decades after the alleged battles between Boudica’s rebel army and their new Roman overlords. A Huge Scale Model of Ancient Rome at Its Architectural Peak, Originally Commissioned by Mussolini The narrator of Teju Cole's Open City, one of the better novels of memory and urban space to come along in recent years, at one point flies into New York City and remembers going to see a "sprawling scale model" of the metropolis at the Queens Museum of Art. "The model had been built for the World’s Fair in 1964, at great cost, and afterward had been periodically updated to keep up with the changing topography and built environment of the city. It showed, in impressive detail, with almost a million tiny buildings, and with bridges, parks, rivers, and architectural landmarks, the true form of the city." The model really exists; you can go see it yourself. But if you get to Rome before you next get to New York, you can see another city model of equally impressive, almost implausible accomplishment there.

Stone Age teaching resources from the UK’s museums © Creswell Crags Stone Age teaching resources from the UK’s museumsA virtual Stone Age We love Virtually The Ice Age, the online learning resource from Creswell Crags (see photo above), where pupils can discover more about the Stone Age, including: Stone Age people, archaeology and excavation techniques, and the natural world. Don’t miss Could You have Survived The Ice Age? section with a quiz and more info about Stone Age art, camp sites and the tools Stone Age people used. Great images used too. More photos of Stone Age objectsExplore more Stone Age objects in the British Museum’s online collection. Tollund Man By Susan K. Lewis Posted 02.07.06 NOVA He has become the face of Iron Age Europe. But in 1950, when men cutting peat near the village of Tollund, Denmark, stumbled upon him, they thought he was a modern murder victim. The police, aware of similar ancient bodies, contacted the Silkeborg Museum, and various specialists—archeologists, forensic scientists, radiologists, paleobotanists, even dentists—later studied his body. Here, learn about their findings and get an intimate view of the 2,400-year-old man.

Roman Ruins HD for iPad Not everyone can afford a quick jaunt around the Mediterranean to view the ruins of ancient Rome, but there's a new iPad app that offers a reasonably facsimile without the whole traveling the world aspect. Roman Ruins HD for iPad includes 1,500 images of ruins from all over the Mediterranean with massive pillars, detailed stonework, and more. It's not a small download, though. The app provides a variety of ways to dive into the images. The Roads of Ancient Rome, Reimagined as a Subway Map - CityLab If the Roman Empire had managed build a continents-spanning transit system for its empire, it might have looked like this. They say all roads lead to Rome, but they also lead outward to a number of intriguing places. There’s Antinoopolis in northern Africa, Londinium in what we now know as the U.K., and—should funding from the mighty Emperor Hadrian arrive—the yet-built Panticapaeum station along the Pontus Euxinus, or Black Sea.

Ancient Rome's System of Roads Visualized in the Style of Modern Subway Maps Sasha Trubetskoy, an undergrad at U. Chicago, has created a "subway-style diagram of the major Roman roads, based on the Empire of ca. 125 AD." Drawing on Stanford’s ORBIS model, The Pelagios Project, and the Antonine Itinerary, Trubetskoy's map combines well-known historic roads, like the Via Appia, with lesser-known ones (in somes cases given imagined names). If you want to get a sense of scale, it would take, Trubetskoy tells us, "two months to walk on foot from Rome to Byzantium. If you had a horse, it would only take you a month." You can view the map in a larger format here.

Collection search Registration numbers The most common type of Museum number begins with the year of acquisition. The database standardises these numbers in the form, for example: 1887,0708.2427 (year: comma: block of four numbers - usually representing a month and day: full-stop and final number). The final number can be of any length and may be followed by another full-stop and a sub-number. In some cases the same number is shared by two or more objects across departments. In some of these cases a prefix has been added before a number (e.g. The Spanish Armada Publication date: 9th December 2010 by Jon Nichol Spanish Armada Beacon This is a highly interactive and stimulating simulation for years 3 and 4, and a very effective way of involving children in a range of issues.

Rome Reborn October, 2013 to August, 2014 High Tech Romans Exhibition Featuring Rome Reborn 2.2 Moves to Technopolis in Mechelen, Belgium High Tech Romans comes to Technopolis in Belgium, where upwards of 500,000 people are expected to see it. The exhibition features 32 interactive exhibits plus 20 showcases full of archaeological finds from the northern part of the Roman Empire. A video based on Rome Reborn 2.2 is shown in the orientation theater at the entrance.

The Extent of the Roman Empire Time has seen the rise and fall of a number of great empires - the Babylonian, the Assyrian, the Egyptian, and lastly, the Persian. Regardless of the size or skill of their army or the capabilities of their leaders, all of these empires fell into ruin. History has demonstrated that one of the many reasons for this ultimate decline was the empire’s vast size - they simply grew too large to manage, falling susceptible to external, as well as internal, forces. One of the greatest of these empires was, of course, the Roman Empire. Over the centuries it grew from a small Italian city to control land throughout Europe across the Balkans to the Middle East and into North Africa. Population & Spread Harnessing Summer Excitement: Using a Medieval Travel Book to Spark Critical Thinking This post is by Matthew Poth, 2017-18 Library of Congress Teacher in Residence. As the weather gets warmer, summer vacation can seem like it’s right around the corner. Naturally, the desire to escape the confines of the classroom, if only for a long weekend, distracts even the most focused students and teachers. From Page 9 of Peregrinatio in Terram Sanctam by Berhard von Breydenbach. Woodcut by Erhard Reuwich, 1490 Harness the excitement for a summer trip into a creative learning opportunity with the help of one of the first printed and illustrated travel books.

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