background preloader

Where the Middle Ages Begin

Where the Middle Ages Begin

http://www.medievalists.net/

Related:  Middle AgesGeneral ResearchTEMSELINGRenaissanceStoria

International Joan of Arc Society International Joan of Arc Society Société Internationale de l'étude de Jeanne d'Arc The International Joan of Arc Society / Société Internationale de l'étude de Jeanne d'Arc is a WWW repository of scholarly and pedagogic information about Joan of Arc collected by faculty, independent scholars, and students. Director: Bonnie Wheeler Assistant Director: Jane Marie Pinzino Founding Committee: Jeremy duQuesnay Adams, Ann Astell, Ora Avni, Robin Blaetz, Anne Llewellyn Barstow, Marie-Véronique Clin, Susan Crane, Kelly DeVries, Richard Einhorn, Jean Fraikin, Deborah Fraioli, Virginia Frohlick, Kevin Harty, Valerie Hotchkiss, H.A. Kelly, Angus J.

Book titles with full text online "The 1688 Paradise Lost and Dr. Aldrich": Metropolitan Museum Journal, v. 6 (1972) Boorsch, Suzanne (1972) 20th-Century Art: A Resource for Educators Paul, Stella (1999) 82nd & Fifth The Metropolitan Museum of Art (2013) Mythical Chronology Limits of the Chart The chart does not establish precise historical dates, but shows the relative position in time of certain legends and characters as may be deduced from the legends themselves. Immortals Among those listed as immortals (the first generations of beings), some have been reported dead: the CYCLOPES, the GIANTS, the Gorgon Medusa 1, Echidna, Orthus, Chimera, the Sphinx and Ladon 4 (see also BESTIARY). The ERINYES, the MELIAD NYMPHS, the GIANTS, and Aphrodite were born as a result of the Castration of Uranus. The immortals are listed in the order of their appearance, according to Hesiod.

On Plants Historia Plantarum (On plants) is a natural science encyclopedia, in which animals, plants, and minerals are illustrated and described for their medicinal properties, in keeping with the medieval tradition of the tacuina medievali (medieval health handbooks), and from which the codex derives its most common name, Tacuinum sanitatis. The work was first compiled as Taqwim al-Sihhah (The maintenance of health) by the 11th-century Baghdad physician Ibn Buṭlān, and chief among his Greek sources was Dioscorides, a physician in the first century. The court in Sicily commissioned a Latin translation in the mid-13th century. Why medieval monks filled manuscript margins with murderous rabbits Long before Sergio Aragonés filled the margins of MAD Magazine with tiny, weird cartoons, the margins of medieval manuscripts were a playground for bored monks with crude senses of humor. While some monks expressed themselves with flat-out crudity, a more common motif was the ubiquitous, triumphant armed rabbit, often shown killing dogs, humans, and other enemies of bunnykind. Writer Jon Kaneko-James explains the symbolism of these murdering coneys, illustrated with fine examples of the form. Since rabbits and hares were signs of cowardice, innocence, helplessness, and passive but willing sexuality (lots of medieval sexual imagery involves wolves jumping on rabbits), the idea of them getting their revenge amused medieval artists as much as it amuses me. Why Are There Violent Rabbits In The Margins Of Medieval Manuscripts? [Jon Kaneko-James]

Home Click here to jump straight to the articles: Original Preface. The Catholic Encyclopedia, as its name implies, proposes to give its readers full and authoritative information on the entire cycle of Catholic interests, action and doctrine. What the Church teaches and has taught; what she has done and is still doing for the highest welfare of mankind; her methods, past and present; her struggles, her triumphs, and the achievements of her members, not only for her own immediate benefit, but for the broadening and deepening of all true science, literature and art — all come within the scope of the Catholic Encyclopedia. 13 Google Search Tricks That Make Life A Whole Lot Easier You think you know how to Google? You don’t know how to Google. Even the most seasoned Googler might not know every tip and trick available with just a few extra keystrokes in the search bar. Consider this your instructions manual for the world’s most popular search engine.

Goddesses of antiquity offer Moses a path away from patriarchy – via funk and soul Aeon email newsletters are issued by the not-for-profit, registered charity Aeon Media Group Ltd (Australian Business Number 80 612 076 614). This Email Newsletter Privacy Statement pertains to the personally identifying information you voluntarily submit in the form of your email address to receive our email newsletters More generally, when visiting the Aeon site you should refer to our site Privacy Policy here. Dioscurides Neapolitanus copied at end of 6c The precious codex known as the Dioscurides Neapolitanus contains the work of Pedanius Dioscorides, the Greek physician who was born at Anazarbus near Tarsus in Cilicia (present-day Turkey) and lived in the first century AD during the reign of the Emperor Nero. Dioscorides wrote the treatise Perì üles iatrichès, commonly known in Latin as De materia medica (Of medical substances), in five books. It is considered the most important medical manual and pharmacopeia of ancient Greece and Rome and was highly regarded in the Middle Ages in both the Western and Arab worlds. The work covers the therapeutic effectiveness of natural substances originating in the animal, vegetable, and mineral kingdoms. The codex at the National Library of Naples includes only the herbal, which, in its 170 illustrated pages, covers all the known medicinal plants with a commentary that describes each plant, its habitat, and its therapeutic uses.

Roman Army - Recruitment, Legions, Siege Warfare & More Evolution of the Roman Army: Recruitment of Soliders for the Roman Army: The Roman army changed over time. The consuls had the power to recruit troops, but in the last years of the Republic, provincial governors were replacing troops without the approval of the consuls. This led to legionaries loyal to their generals rather than Rome. Before Marius, recruitment was limited to citizens enrolled in the top 5 Roman classes.

Related: