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The Reformation - Facts & Summary

The Reformation - Facts & Summary

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Related:  Renaissance PeriodWISDOM'S...WORDS... MAAT VULTURE EAGLE ANCIENT CHURCH

History: Renaissance for Kids Back to History for Kids The Renaissance was a period of time from the 14th to the 17th century in Europe. This era bridged the time between the Middle Ages and modern times. The word "Renaissance" means "rebirth". Coming out of the Dark The Middle Ages began with the fall of the Roman Empire. Renaissance Art - Facts & Summary By the end of the 15th century, Rome had displaced Florence as the principal center of Renaissance art, reaching a high point under the powerful and ambitious Pope Leo X (a son of Lorenzo de’ Medici). Three great masters–Leonardo da Vinci, Michelangelo and Raphael–dominated the period known as the High Renaissance, which lasted roughly from the early 1490s until the sack of Rome by the troops of the Holy Roman Emperor Charles V of Spain in 1527. Leonardo (1452-1519) was the ultimate “Renaissance man” for the breadth of his intellect, interest and talent and his expression of humanist and classical values. Leonardo’s best-known works, including the “Mona Lisa” (1503-05), “The Virgin of the Rocks” (1485) and the fresco “The Last Supper” (1495-98), showcase his unparalleled ability to portray light and shadow, as well as the physical relationship between figures–humans, animals and objects alike–and the landscape around them.

Johannes Gutenberg - Inventor German inventor Johannes Gutenberg developed a method of movable type and used it to create one of the Western world's first major printed books, the “Forty-Two-Line” Bible. Synopsis Johannes Gutenberg was born circa 1395, in Mainz, Germany. He started experimenting with printing by 1438. In 1450 Gutenberg obtained backing from the financier, Johann Fust, whose impatience and other factors led to Gutenberg's loss of his establishment to Fust several years later. Gutenberg's masterpiece, and the first book ever printed in Europe from movable type, is the “Forty-Two-Line” Bible, completed no later than 1455. Christianity Reformation, Britannica Classic: The Reformation: Age of RevoltEncyclopædia Britannica, Inc.the religious revolution that took place in the Western church in the 16th century. Its greatest leaders undoubtedly were Martin Luther and John Calvin.

The Norton Anthology of English Literature, Ninth Edition: W. W. Norton StudySpace Volume D The Romantic Period 1785–1832 (NAEL Vol. D) The Romantic period is short, relative to other literary periods, but is still quite complex. Lecture 16: The Romantic Era The categories which it has become customary to use in distinguishing and classifying "movements" in literature or philosophy and in describing the nature of the significant transitions which have taken place in taste and in opinion, are far too rough, crude, undiscriminating -- and none of them so hopelessly as the category "Romantic."---Arthur O. Lovejoy, "On the Discriminations of Romanticisms" (1924)

The Culture of Rebellion in the Romantic Era Eugene Delacroix, Liberty Leading the People, 1830. One of Delacroix’s best known works, the painting depicts a bare-breasted Liberty leading Parisians of mixed social and economic backgrounds into battle. The Romantic era is typically noted for its intense political, social, and cultural upheavals. Romanticism If the Enlightenment was a movement which started among a tiny elite and slowly spread to make its influence felt throughout society, Romanticism was more widespread both in its origins and influence. No other intellectual/artistic movement has had comparable variety, reach, and staying power since the end of the Middle Ages. Beginning in Germany and England in the 1770s, by the 1820s it had swept through Europe, conquering at last even its most stubborn foe, the French. It traveled quickly to the Western Hemisphere, and in its musical form has triumphed around the globe, so that from London to Boston to Mexico City to Tokyo to Vladivostok to Oslo, the most popular orchestral music in the world is that of the romantic era. After almost a century of being attacked by the academic and professional world of Western formal concert music, the style has reasserted itself as neoromanticism in the concert halls. Origins:

Notes on the Romantic Age The Romantic Age Important themes The Romantic Movement of the early 19th was a reaction to many cultural, social and political developments. Many artists and thinkers began to see developments in society threatening individualism: the factory system made human beings replaceable parts in a system, and mass political movements (like the French Revolution) diminished individual accomplishment. Similarly, increased urbanization made people feel cut off nature. Also, Neoclassicism's strict rules and formalism began to seem limiting. In reaction, the Romantic Movement stressed the individuality of the artist's expression, a personal relationship with nature, and a trust in emotion and subjective experience.

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