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História dos Impérios Orientais em animação

História dos Impérios Orientais em animação

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Scandinavian - Scandinavian America - Immigration...- Classroom Presentation Scandinavian America The Scandinavian immigrants not only built new lives in the United States; they also built a new culture. As immigrants from Scandinavia flooded into sparsely populated areas of the U.S., they helped create a particularly Scandinavian way of life, melding the varied religious, culinary, literary, and linguistic traditions that they brought with them with those that they found in their new country. During the late 19th and early 20th centuries, in the Great Lakes states, the northern Great Plains, and in enclaves scattered among northern U.S. cities, a visitor might imagine that he or she was traveling through a unique new nation—Scandinavian America.

Simulating the Senate: Classics Course Immerses Students in Roman History and Government A meeting of the Roman senate in Michael Nerdahl’s class “The Republic of Rome and the Evolution of Executive Power” (Illustration credit: Abby McBride) “All in favor?” says Lucius Manlius, surveying a sea of raised hands in the Roman senate. Six Reasons Why The Wall Is Holy 1) Site of the Holy Temple The Western Wall is a surviving remnant of the Temple Mount in Jerusalem, which was destroyed by the Romans in 70 CE. The Temple was the center of the spiritual world, the main conduit for the flow of Godliness. When the Temple stood, the world was filled with awe of God and appreciation for the genius of the Torah. 40 Must-See Historical Photos EmailEmail While some photographs capture our attention because of how the artist behind the picture has decided to compose the shot, others are fascinating simply because of the subjects that they depict. Below are some captivating photographs that tell stories about our past, depicting the people, places and events that have shaped the course of history. Some of these pictures tell us about history in a way that books and documents will never be able to. Source: boredpanda

Smarthistory: a multimedia web-book about art and art history Smarthistory offers more than 1500 videos and essays on art from around the world and across time. We are working with more than 200 art historians and some of the world's most important museums to make the best art history resource anywhere. Use the "subject" pulldown menu (go to "Arts and Humanities") at the top of this window or click on the headings below to access our content: Art history basics First things first (you are here) The materials and techniques artists use Art 1010

Mummies Show Symptoms, Offer Disease Clues A.R. Williams Whether laid to rest in a simple grave or a grand tomb, the human body rarely survives the sweep of time. 20 Wonderful Online Museums and Sites for Virtual Field Trips to Use in Class January 27, 2014 Yesterday when I was working on the list of iPad apps that teachers can use with their students to make virtual field trips, it dawned on me to compile another list of web based platforms for both online museums and virtual field sites that can be used with students in class. After scouring the web for hours I finally landed on the selection below. Have a look and as always share with your students and colleagues. 1- National Portrait Gallery The Smithsonian’s National Portrait Gallery tells the history of America through individuals who have shaped its culture. Through the visual arts, performing arts and new media, the Portrait Gallery portrays poets and presidents, visionaries and villains, actors and activists whose lives tell the American story. 2- Smithsonian Museums

GLOBAL HISTORY - The Learning Network Blog One example of the new Science Take video series. As our regular readers know, the mission of this blog is to find New York Times content suitable for teaching and learning — then, via lesson plans, writing prompts, quizzes and more, suggest ways for teachers to use it. In the course of our daily scavenging, we naturally pay close attention to the sections and features that most people think of first when they think “New York Times”: breaking news, Op-Eds and editorials, reviews, multimedia and photojournalism, important special reports and, increasingly, video.

Garden of Eden The Garden of Eden (Hebrew גַּן עֵדֶן, Gan ʿEḏen) is the biblical "garden of God", described most notably in the Book of Genesis chapters 2 and 3, and also in the Book of Ezekiel.[2] The "garden of God", not called Eden, is mentioned in Genesis 14, and the "trees of the garden" are mentioned in Ezekiel 31. The Book of Zechariah and the Book of Psalms also refer to trees and water in relation to the temple without explicitly mentioning Eden.[3] Traditionally, the favoured derivation of the name "Eden" was from the Akkadian edinnu, derived from a Sumerian word meaning "plain" or "steppe". Eden is now believed to be more closely related to an Aramaic root word meaning "fruitful, well-watered

Clara Webb: Beyond Memorization: Rethinking Maps in the History Classroom As teachers, it's hard not use our past experiences as students as a barometer for what we do in our classrooms. When I think about using maps in my history classes, my mind often replays a memory from my own ninth grade Western Civ' experience: Mr. Johnson distributed blank outline maps of Europe. Like good honors students, we dutifully looked up and labeled each country. We memorized the map. We took a test.

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