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Tips for Linux Explorers

Tips for Linux Explorers
TIPS FOR LINUX EXPLORERSHelpful info for those learning Linux These Linux tips are meant to provide just enough information to whet your appetite for more. They are updated frequently and are not presented in any particular order. There is a site-search box at the end of this page.. . . . . . .

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Nick Farina - Git Is Simpler Than You Think It was about one year ago that we switched to Git. Previously, we used Subversion, through the Mac app Versions, which (rightly) holds an Apple Design Award. I made the executive decision to leave our comfy world of Versions because it seemed clear that Git was winning the Internet. There was much grumbling from my teammates, who were busy enough doing actual work thank you very much. But I pressed forward. We signed up for accounts on Github. Linux Newbie Guide: Shortcuts And Commands Linux Shortcuts and Commands: Linux Newbie Administrator Guideby Stan and Peter Klimas This is a practical selection of the commands we use most often. Press <Tab> to see the listing of all available command (on your PATH). On my small home system, it says there are 2595 executables on my PATH. Many of these "commands" can be accessed from your favourite GUI front-end (probably KDE or Gnome) by clicking on the right menu or button.

The Best Linux Applications of 2013 2013 – What A Year, Right? This time last year we knew nothing of Ubuntu Touch; Canonical attempting to raise $32 million for a cutting-edge smartphone would’ve sounded insane; Mir was a space station while Wayland was the future; and as far as Saucy Salamanders and Trusty Tahrs are concerned, they were nothing but adjunct words on the pages of untroubled thesaurus. It’s been a busy year. Canonical continue to stride forwards towards a converged future for the OS, while an estimated 25 million people continue to use the regular desktop version for their day-to-day computing needs.

How to control Ubuntu from the command line Even a master at Linux desktop-fu can find using the command line difficult. But beyond the basic commands to navigate and manage your system there are like arcane spells special incantations that provide new functionality save you time or which are just plain interesting. Here’s a small selection of command-line gems with a focus on the desktop and Ubuntu. Cool, but obscure unix tools Just a list of 20 (now 28) tools for the command line. Some are little-known, some are just too useful to miss, some are pure obscure -- I hope you find something useful that you weren't aware of yet! Use your operating system's package manager to install most of them. Create a "mountable" disk image in GNU/Linux In this article I will explain how to create a file that works like a USB drive -- without the "physical" side of a USB disk. The advantage of making such a file is that you can make it encrypted; as a result, nobody will ever be able to see what's in it unless they know the passphrase. As a first step, simply create a file that acts as a plain, un-encrypted container of information. First of all, create an empty file: fallocate -l 512M image.iso

Ubuntu Hacks/Multimedia From WikiContent A modern computer can be a nifty little entertainment center; it has fast video, stereo speakers, probably plenty of disk space for movies and videos. So, how come Ubuntu doesn't know what to do when you insert a DVD or double-click on a video or audio file? The fundamental problem is that there are some critical pieces to the multimedia puzzle that Ubuntu can't distribute in all jurisdictions, so you need to go out and get those pieces yourself. Fortunately, Ubuntu makes it easy for you to install those bits once you do obtain them. In this chapter, you'll learn how to get Ubuntu to support more multimedia formats, play DVDs, and even let you buy music online.

Datavu: Useful Unix commands for exploring data While dealing with big genetic data sets I often got stuck with limitation of programming languages in terms of reading big files. Also sometimes it is not convenient to load the data file in Python or R in order to perform few basic checks and exploratory analysis. Unix commands are pretty handy in these scenarios and often takes significantly less time in execution. Lets consider movie data set from some parallel universe (with random values) for this assignment. There are 8 fields in total, With few duplicate records Linux: Install a million games in one click! Linux: Install a million games in one click! Updated: December 16, 2009 Well, not really a million, but how about tens or hundreds? Good enough for you? 32 Best Linux Desktop Customization #4 Voici la quatrième édition des meilleures personnalisations de bureaux Linux. Six mois se sont écoulés depuis la dernière présentation, les tendances n'ont pas beaucoup évolué, sauf peut-être que l'on voit de plus en plus de customizations à base de KDE (cf. 6 derniers screenshots). Je vous laisse les découvrir sans plus attendre. Gaia10 Linux by Gabriela2400 GTK & Metacity: SproutPidgin iconset by Gabriela2400Covergloobus by Gabriela2400Conky: 5 individual configs made by Gabriela2400Wallpaper: See The WorldAWN: Skin by Gabriela2400Dock icons: Gaia IconsSource

CPU frequency scaling CPU frequency scaling enables the operating system to scale the CPU frequency up or down in order to save power. CPU frequencies can be scaled automatically depending on the system load, in response to ACPI events, or manually by userspace programs. CPU frequency scaling is implemented in Linux kernel, the infrastructure is called cpufreq. Since kernel 3.4 the necessary modules are loaded automatically and the recommended ondemand governor is enabled by default.

Positive Psychology Exercise - Emoclear Self-Helpapedia Emoclear Positve Psychology Exercise I: Doing Pleasurable, Important, and Meaningful Activities Every day for two weeks do the following: 1. Learning the shell. Why do you need to learn the command line anyway? Well, let me tell you a story. Not long ago we had a problem where I used to work. There was a shared drive on one of our file servers that kept getting full.

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