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What is free software?

What is free software?
The Free Software Definition Have a question about free software licensing not answered here? See our other licensing resources, and if necessary contact the FSF Compliance Lab at licensing@fsf.org. “Free software” means software that respects users' freedom and community. Roughly, it means that the users have the freedom to run, copy, distribute, study, change and improve the software. Thus, “free software” is a matter of liberty, not price. We campaign for these freedoms because everyone deserves them. The four essential freedoms A program is free software if the program's users have the four essential freedoms: [1] The freedom to run the program as you wish, for any purpose (freedom 0). A program is free software if it gives users adequately all of these freedoms. In any given scenario, these freedoms must apply to whatever code we plan to make use of, or lead others to make use of. “Free software” does not mean “noncommercial”. The freedom to run the program as you wish Copyleft

http://www.gnu.org/philosophy/free-sw.html

Parallel tutorial This tutorial shows off much of GNU parallel's functionality. The tutorial is meant to learn the options in GNU parallel. The tutorial is not to show realistic examples from the real world. Spend an hour walking through the tutorial. Le manifeste GNU The GNU Manifesto (which appears below) was written by Richard Stallman in 1985 to ask for support in developing the GNU operating system. Part of the text was taken from the original announcement of 1983. Through 1987, it was updated in minor ways to account for developments; since then, it seems best to leave it unchanged. Since that time, we have learned about certain common misunderstandings that different wording could help avoid. Footnotes added since 1993 help clarify these points.

Free software is a matter of liberty, not price As our society grows more dependent on computers, the software we run is of critical importance to securing the future of a free society. Free software is about having control over the technology we use in our homes, schools and businesses, where computers work for our individual and communal benefit, not for proprietary software companies or governments who might seek to restrict and monitor us. The Free Software Foundation exclusively uses free software to perform its work. The Free Software Foundation is working to secure freedom for computer users by promoting the development and use of free (as in freedom) software and documentation—particularly the GNU operating system—and by campaigning against threats to computer user freedom like Digital Restrictions Management (DRM) and software patents. Our Core Work

Use multiple CPU Cores with your Linux commands Here’s a common problem: You ever want to add up a very large list (hundreds of megabytes) or grep through it, or other kind of operation that is embarrassingly parallel? Data scientists, I am talking to you. You probably have about four cores or more, but our tried and true tools like grep, bzip2, wc, awk, sed and so forth are singly-threaded and will just use one CPU core. Guide rapide de la GPLv3 - Projet GNU - Free Software Foundation (FSF) by Brett Smith [This article is also available in PDF and reStructuredText formats.] After a year and a half of public consultation, thousands of comments, and four drafts, version 3 of the GNU General Public License (GPLv3) was finally published on June 29, 2007. While there's been a lot of discussion about the license since the first draft appeared, not many people have talked about the benefits that it provides developers.

Examples using grep 4.2.1. What is grep? grep searches the input files for lines containing a match to a given pattern list. When it finds a match in a line, it copies the line to standard output (by default), or whatever other sort of output you have requested with options. Though grep expects to do the matching on text, it has no limits on input line length other than available memory, and it can match arbitrary characters within a line. If the final byte of an input file is not a newline, grep silently supplies one. Pourquoi l'« open source » passe à coté du problème que soulève le logiciel libre by Richard Stallman When we call software “free,” we mean that it respects the users' essential freedoms: the freedom to run it, to study and change it, and to redistribute copies with or without changes. This is a matter of freedom, not price, so think of “free speech,” not “free beer.” These freedoms are vitally important. They are essential, not just for the individual users' sake, but for society as a whole because they promote social solidarity—that is, sharing and cooperation.

Parallel GNU parallel is a shell tool for executing jobs in parallel using one or more computers. A job can be a single command or a small script that has to be run for each of the lines in the input. The typical input is a list of files, a list of hosts, a list of users, a list of URLs, or a list of tables. A job can also be a command that reads from a pipe. Linux et GNU by Richard Stallman Many computer users run a modified version of the GNU system every day, without realizing it. Through a peculiar turn of events, the version of GNU which is widely used today is often called “Linux”, and many of its users are not aware that it is basically the GNU system, developed by the GNU Project. There really is a Linux, and these people are using it, but it is just a part of the system they use.

Regular expressions 4.1.1. What are regular expressions? A regular expression is a pattern that describes a set of strings. The History of Tux the Linux Penguin - Wikiid [Tux] "...looks too much like Homer Simpson" -- Albert Cahalan. ...Just when you thought that Tux was about as cute as he could possibly be... Thanks to Paul and Eleya Frields for these photos of Evelyn-the-Penguin. So cute! FreeDOS bootable image generation HOWTO This document describes how to make a small image which can be booted either via PXE or after writing it to an USB flash drive. I used Debian Linux 7 "wheezy" for this. But other Linux distributions should work too. What you will need

Supported Linux distributions LinuxLive USB Creator is currently supporting these Linux distributions: .IMG files are supported but it's experimental: it works only with a Live mode (no persistence) and no virtualization (because there is not enough free space on the USB key after writing the IMG file). LinuxLive USB Creator will only burn the .IMG on your USB key, nothing more. Control Network Traffic with iptables Updated by Linode Packet filtering using network rules such as NAT (network address translation) can be accomplished by using iptables. Iptables utilize ports and protocols and may also be used as a firewall. Using iptables for IPv4 By default, the iptables tool is included with your Linode supplied distribution.

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