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10 Ways Manipulators Use Emotional Intelligence for Evil (and How to Fight Back)

10 Ways Manipulators Use Emotional Intelligence for Evil (and How to Fight Back)
Emotional intelligence is nothing new. Sure, the term was coined in the 1960's, and popularized by psychologists in recent decades. But the concept of emotional intelligence--which I define as a person's ability to recognize and understand emotions and use that information to guide decision making--has been around as long as we have. This skill we refer to as emotional intelligence (also known as EI or EQ) is like any other ability: You can cultivate it, work to enhance it, sharpen it. And it's important to know that just like other skills, emotional intelligence can be used both ethically and unethically. The dark side of emotional intelligence Organizational psychologist and best-selling author Adam Grant identified EI at its worst in his essay for The Atlantic, The Dark Side of Emotional Intelligence: "Recognizing the power of emotions...one of the most influential leaders of the 20th century spent years studying the emotional effects of his body language. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10.

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