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7 vital browser plugins for newsgathering and verification UPDATE – This article was originally published on Jan 6 2016, but has been updated with the first two tools. Know of any others we may have missed? Let us know on Twitter. When breaking news can travel the world in seconds, it is important for journalists to have the tools at their disposal to get to work fast. MIL as Composite Concept Empowerment of people through Media and Information Literacy (MIL) is an important prerequisite for fostering equitable access to information and knowledge and promoting free, independent and pluralistic media and information systems. Media and Information Literacy recognizes the primary role of information and media in our everyday lives. It lies at the core of freedom of expression and information - since it empowers citizens to understand the functions of media and other information providers, to critically evaluate their content, and to make informed decisions as users and producer of information and media content. Information Literacy and Media Literacy are traditionally seen as separate and distinct fields.

sans titre Our students use the web every day -- shouldn't we expect them to do better at interpreting what they read there? Perhaps … but not necessarily. Often, stereotypes about kids and technology can get in the way of what's at stake in today's complex media landscape. #alternativefacts Propaganda (noun): Information that is often exaggerated or false and spread for the purpose of benefiting or promoting a specific individual or cause. Fake news is, quite simply, news (“material reported in a newspaper or news periodical or on a newscast”) that is fake (“false, counterfeit”) - #alternativefacts Spin Journalism (noun): News and information that is manipulated or slanted to affect its interpretation and influence public opinion. Opinion (noun): A belief or judgment that rests on grounds insufficient to produce complete certainty. Media Bias/Lean: A political bias in journalistic reporting, in programming selection, or otherwise in mass communications media. Satire: the use of humor, irony, exaggeration, or ridicule to expose and criticize people's stupidity or vices, particularly in the context of contemporary politics and other topical issues.

Beers & Probst: Responsible Reading and Fake News By Kylene Beers & Robert Probst How do we teach kids across the grades to read responsibly? Close attention to an author’s words – the responsibility a reader shows to the text – implies and requires a responsibility to oneself as well as the words on the page. That responsibility consists not only of a willingness to acknowledge and defend one’s own thoughts and values, but to change our thinking when evidence or reason dictates. Turn Students into Fact-Finding Web Detectives Fact-Checking Tips and Tools for Teachers and Students Show students where to look for credible information on the web. Explain that professional fact-checkers may already have done this important work for us.

Stony Brook Center for News Literacy The full News Literacy course, developed at Stony Brook University, organizes the material into 8 concepts that are spread amongst our 14 week course that take students from the first information revolution of Johannes Gutenberg's printing press to the Digital Age of Mark Zuckerberg's Facebook. Each lesson stands alone or can easily be integrated into your program. Below, find a summary of each of those lessons, and a link to the most updated version of the teaching materials for each from our professors at Stony Brook University. Each of the following Course Packs include PowerPoint presentations, associated media, lecture notes, and recitation materials. You will notice as the semester progresses, the name of some of our lessons change, along with the sequence of the lessons. If needed, you can find last semester's course pack at THIS LINK.

Fake News: Recommendations - Media Literacy Clearinghouse If you read any news story about “fake news” in the past 18 months, you no doubt came across the phrase “media literacy.” From the various news stories and blog posts, I have compiled the following recommendations and advice. (NOTE: lesson plans, handouts and related videos are posted near the bottom of this list) Newest materials are posted last. Do you have suggestions for content that could be added here? Please consider sending it to me: fbaker1346@gmail.com

How Teachers Can Navigate School Closures Due to the Coronavirus Updated with new resources on 4/29/20. Online Learning Resources Use these trusted resources to continue to provide meaningful learning experiences for students during school closures. The Definitive List of 176 Fake News Sites on Facebook Fake news is unavoidable. While the idea of “fake news” was born out of the very real instances of fake news stories helping sway the election in favor of now-President Donald Trump, it has since been co-opted by Trump’s administration to be used as a weapon to sow doubt in legitimate media stories that they find unappealing. But real fake news—not the kind Trump likes to point out on Twitter virtually every day—is pervasive. And if you care about reading truthful stories, you need to be on high alert.

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