background preloader

Fake News

Fake News
Skip to main content Fake News, Misinformation, and Propaganda This guide offers a brief introduction to the spread of misinformation of all kinds and tools for identifying it, and reading the news with a more informed eye A Visual Take Library Resources Using library databases is a near-foolproof way to find credible information. News databases: U.S. government information and background: Background Reports from Harvard and other universities: Fake news and the spread of misinformation From the Shorenstein Center at the Harvard Kennedy School, links to peer-reviewed articles. NiemanReports: Election '16: Lessons for Journalism From the Nieman Foundation at Harvard; several articles on fake news and news literacy Evaluating Information: The Cornerstone of Civic Online Reasoning Stanford University study on high school and college students (lack of) news literacy Lies, Damn Lies and Viral Content: How News Websites Spread (and Debunk) Online Rumors, Unverified Claims and Misinformation Poynter

http://guides.library.harvard.edu/fake

Related:  edWebet74Fake NewsDigital, Media, and News Literacy (Part I)FAKE NEWSkpudney

'Boys On The Bus': 40 Years Later, Many Are Girls Reporters surround Sens. George McGovern (left) and Hubert Humphrey after a Democratic presidential debate in 1972. George Brich/AP hide caption toggle caption George Brich/AP Covering the White House: “Who Ya Gonna Believe?” - The New Yorker Radio Hour The media’s relationship with a President has never been more contentious than in this Administration. Journalists are struggling to keep up with hard-to-believe news and what Kellyanne Conway described as the “alternative facts,” also called lies, by official sources. Ben Smith, the editor-in-chief of BuzzFeed, walks David Remnick through his decision to publish an unverified dossier that alleges Donald Trump’s secret ties to Russia. Critics argued that BuzzFeed’s “decide for yourself” attitude toward publication undermines the public’s trust in the media at this precarious moment.

Students Reject 'Fake News' To Write Footnoted, Neutral Wikipedia Entries : NPR Ed Fake news has been, well, in the news a lot lately. But for the world's largest crowdsourced encyclopedia, it's nothing new. "Wikipedia has been dealing with fake news since it started 16 years ago," notes LiAnna Davis, deputy director of the Wiki Education Foundation.

Episode 63: Late-Night Icon David Letterman and Songwriter Jason Isbell Our privacy promise The New Yorker's Strongbox is designed to let you communicate with our writers and editors with greater anonymity and security than afforded by conventional e-mail. When you visit or use our public Strongbox server at The New Yorker and our parent company, Condé Nast, will not record your I.P. address or information about your browser, computer, or operating system, nor will we embed third-party content or deliver cookies to your browser. Strongbox servers are under the physical control of The New Yorker and Condé Nast. Strongbox is designed to be accessed only through a “hidden service” on the Tor anonymity network, which is set up to conceal both your online and physical location from us and to offer full end-to-end encryption for your communications with us. This provides a higher level of security and anonymity in your communication with us than afforded by standard e-mail or unencrypted Web forms.

Where News Audiences Fit on the Political Spectrum Where do Americans get their news about politics and government? And how does the media environment intersect with political polarization? A Pew Research Center study based on a representative online survey finds striking differences in news habits along the ideological spectrum. Explore the data: Teen Vogue's Political Coverage Isn’t Surprising - The Atlantic On Saturday morning, Teen Vogue published an op-ed by Lauren Duca titled “Donald Trump Is Gaslighting America.” The tone and message of the piece, which compared the ways in which the president-elect talks about his record to the ways abusive spouses psychologically manipulate their partners, struck a notable chord with readers on social media, garnering almost 30,000 retweets from Teen Vogue’s account, and getting shared by personalities from Patton Oswalt to Dan Rather. Many people tweeting the story did so with an incredulous tone, seeming surprised that a teen-oriented magazine was publishing incisive political coverage rather than makeup tutorials or One Direction interviews. But the tone of Duca’s piece was representative of a larger shift Teen Vogue has made over the last year. In May, 29-year-old Elaine Welteroth took over as editor from Amy Astley, who helped found the magazine in 2003.

Commentary: It’s Facebook’s algorithm vs. democracy, and so far the algorithm is winning — NOVA Next Over the last several years, Facebook has been participating—unintentionally—in the erosion of democracy. The social network may feel like a modern town square, but thanks to its tangle of algorithms, it’s nothing like the public forums of the past. The company determines, according to its interests and those of its shareholders, what we see and learn on its social network. The result has been a loss of focus on critical national issues, an erosion of civil disagreement, and a threat to democracy itself. Facebook is just one part—though a large part—of the Big Data economy, one built on math-powered applications that are based on choices made by fallible human beings. Trump administration to change transgender student bathroom rules White House preparing to reverse transgend... It looks like Republican President Donald Trump may be preparing to reverse a U.S. policy on transgender rights, set in place by Trump's predecessor, President Barack Obama. USA TODAY The Trump administration is poised to issue new guidance outlining which restrooms transgender students can use, potentially sowing confusion in schools, angering LGBTQ rights groups and adding uncertainty to a widely discussed case due to come before the next month. Speaking to reporters Wednesday, White House Press Secretary said President Trump is "a firm believer in states' rights and that certain issues like this are not best dealt with at the federal level.'' "The conclusions that everyone in the administration has agreed upon,'' Spicer said, "there is no daylight between anybody, between the president and any of the secretaries.''

Bibliotech: Media Literacy Part I During my edWeb.netwebinar today (5PM, eastern), I will interview Greg Toppo, the National Education Writer for USA Today, and author The Game Believes in You. “Fake news” is the buzz phrase of the season. For librarians, this is not a new topic. Teaching source evaluation is our bread and butter. So when I started thinking about what to discuss with Greg during this webinar, it occurred to me that I’ve been stockpiling questions for over five years. How Facebook and the 'Filter Bubble' Pushed Trump to Victory Donald Trump’s victory is blindsiding, like stepping into a crosswalk and getting slammed into by a delivery guy cycling the wrong way down a one-way street. This is because, as media scholars understand it, we increasingly live in a “filter bubble”: The information we take in is so personalized that we’re blind to other perspectives. It simultaneously explains why Trumpism has flourished and why so many of us are insulated from it.

for Schools Preparing students to participate thoughtfully in democracy - and in life. Students need to learn how to sort through mass media and social networks, think critically about the issues, and engage with each other in a healthy and positive way, even when there are differences in opinions and backgrounds. AllSides for Schools helps educators teach these valuable lessons and skills. With its unique focus on maintaining healthy relationships and revealing multiple points of view across the political spectrum, it also avoids the potential problems around bias or disrespecting individual beliefs.

How to Spot Fake News Fake news is nothing new. But bogus stories can reach more people more quickly via social media than what good old-fashioned viral emails could accomplish in years past. Concern about the phenomenon led Facebook and Google to announce that they’ll crack down on fake news sites, restricting their ability to garner ad revenue.

Related: