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The Honest Truth about Fake News … and How Not to Fall for It (with Lesson Plan)

The Honest Truth about Fake News … and How Not to Fall for It (with Lesson Plan)
Did you hear that Pope Francis endorsed Donald Trump for president? Or that Hillary Clinton sold weapons to ISIS? Crazy, right? And … 100 percent false. But if you were one of the millions of people drawn to a bogus headline in your Facebook feed — or other social media platform of choice — and found yourself reading an article on what seemed like a legitimate news site (something like, say, The Political Insider, which “reported” the Clinton-ISIS story), then why wouldn’t you believe it? I mean, people you supposedly trust shared it with you and it ranked high in the Google search. Welcome to the world of “fake news.” Digital deception It comes as little surprise that the web is chock full of commercial click-bait hoaxes: get-rich-quick schemes, free Caribbean cruises, erectile dysfunction treatments … you name it. But as it turns out, the internet is also teeming with bogus information sites that masquerade as real news. Fake news, real profit, serious consequences Fake news is nothing new

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Lesson Plan: How to Spot Fake News The problem of fake news came to a dizzying head in 2016 when a man fired a shot in a family pizzeria as he “self-investigated” a false report of a child abuse ring led by top democrats. A BuzzFeed report confirmed that fake news stories, such as the one that claimed Hillary Clinton sold arms to ISIS, were actually viewed more times than articles from established and legitimate news sources. Did fake news have an impact on the election? How to choose your news How the media landscape has changed Media visionary Clay Shirky gave a TED Talk on how the media landscape has changed. “The moment we’re living through, the moment our historical generation is living through, is the largest increase in expressive capability in human history.” In other words, the amount of information we are capable of capturing is unprecedented.

Fake News Is Here: Help Students Detect It We highly recommend that teachers explore the New York Times Learning Network article (1/19/17) sharing many lesson ideas and resources (including this post): Evaluating Sources in a ‘Post-Truth’ World: Ideas for Teaching and Learning About Fake News. By Frank W. Baker “Dewey Defeats Truman” read the large-type headline on the front page of The Chicago Daily Tribune for the issue published the night of the 1948 presidential election. The headline was wrong: Harry Truman HAD won. The paper went to press before the final votes were counted. How to outsmart fake news in your Facebook feed It doesn't have to be this way. Fake news is actually really easy to spot -- if you know how. Consider this your New Media Literacy Guide. 1. Does the story come from a strange URL? Zimdars says sites with strange suffixes like ".co" or ".su," or that are hosted by third party platforms like WordPress should raise a red flag.

Is technology smart enough to fix the fake news frenzy? The debate about “fake news” and the “post-truth” society we now supposedly inhabit has become the epistemological version of a feeding frenzy: so much heat, so little light. Two things about it are particularly infuriating. The first is the implicit assumption that “truth” is somehow a straightforward thing and our problem is that we just can’t be bothered any more to find it. We Tracked Down A Fake-News Creator In The Suburbs. Here's What We Learned : All Tech Considered "The whole idea from the start was to build a site that could kind of infiltrate the echo chambers of the alt-right." Fanatic Studio/Getty Images hide caption toggle caption Fanatic Studio/Getty Images

untitled Schoolwork “The teacher said we can’t use the internet.” The San Rafael Public Library has a vast collection of books on every topic for your information needs, but don’t forget to check out our online homework resources to find vetted information from reputable publishers. Our e-resources combine reliability with the convenience of researching from home or wherever you have internet access. “The teacher said we can use the internet, but not Wikipedia.” Can You Tell Fake News From Real? Study Finds Students Have 'Dismaying' Inability Stanford researchers assessed students from middle school to college and found they struggled to distinguish ads from articles, neutral sources from biased ones and fake accounts from real ones. Gary Waters/Ikon Images/Getty Images hide caption toggle caption Gary Waters/Ikon Images/Getty Images Stanford researchers assessed students from middle school to college and found they struggled to distinguish ads from articles, neutral sources from biased ones and fake accounts from real ones. If the children are the future, the future might be very ill-informed.

Fake Facebook News Sites to Avoid As Facebook and now Google face scrutiny for promoting fake news stories, Melissa Zimdars, a communication and media professor from Merrimack College in Massachusetts, has compiled a handy list of websites you should think twice about trusting. “Below is a list of fake, false, regularly misleading, and otherwise questionable ‘news’ organizations that are commonly shared on Facebook and other social media sites,” Zimdars explains. “Many of these websites rely on ‘outrage’ by using distorted headlines and decontextualized or dubious information in order to generate likes, shares, and profits.” (Click here to see the list.)

Now you can fact-check Trump’s tweets — in the tweets themselves This article has been updated to include a link to a Firefox version of the extension and to include tweets sent from the POTUS account. On Friday morning, President-elect Donald Trump took a new tack in his war on the Russia hacking issue. As our Dave Weigel noted, this isn't really accurate. There was nothing illegal at play, and Donna Brazile wasn't the head of the Democratic National Committee at the time that she leaked town hall questions to the Hillary Clinton campaign. Weigel wrote a whole post about the issue — but people who just click through to the link see only Trump's claim, and none of the context. Unless, of course, they've installed our extension for Google Chrome -- or, now: Firefox.

All I Know Is What’s on the Internet All I Know Is What’s on the Internet Information literacy is not the antidote to fake news, because the institutions for teaching it can’t be trusted either Rolin Moe January 17, 2017 share Fake News, Misinformation, and Propaganda Skip to main content Fake News, Misinformation, and Propaganda This guide offers a brief introduction to the spread of misinformation of all kinds and tools for identifying it, and reading the news with a more informed eye A Visual Take Library Resources Using library databases is a near-foolproof way to find credible information.

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