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Video: How to choose your news

Video: How to choose your news

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q-Y-z6HmRgI

Related:  edWebet #75 - Digital LiteracyFake NewsDigital, Media, and News Literacy (Part II)

Blog post: Post-Truth and Fake News Earlier in the year I was tasked with creating a resource guide on “post-truth” and fake news. It’s not something I was clamoring to do. To be honest: I was still in the post-election malaise–and my heart was just not into it. Rarely would I label any of my work tasks as “edicts,” (I like the flexibility and creativity of my job) but this time it was. As part of a broader campus-wide discussion, the library needed to play a part. Verification Handbook for Investigative Reporting Craig Silverman is the founder of Emergent, a real-time rumor tracker and debunker. He was a fellow with the Tow Center for Digital Journalism at Columbia University, and is a leading expert on media errors, accuracy and verification. Craig is also the founder and editor of Regret the Error, a blog about media accuracy and the discipline of verification that is now a part of the Poynter Institute. He edited the Verification Handbook, previously served as director of content for Spundge, and helped launch OpenFile, an online local news startup that delivered community-driven reporting in six Canadian cities. Craig is also the former managing editor of PBS MediaShift and has been a columnist for The Globe And Mail, Toronto Star, and Columbia Journalism Review.

Article: What does – and doesn’t – make news? Just because you announce something in a news release doesn’t actually make it news. Unfortunately, many organisations don’t get that and they are disappointed and frustrated when the release they have crafted does not generate publicity. Most often they blame the media when in fact the organisation itself hasn’t understood what actually makes news. Social Media Superstar Finalists Announced! Acknowledging the role social media plays in school library promotion, AASL has launched a new recognition program – Social Media Superstars. Nominated and endorsed by their peers, the program will recognize school library professionals who enrich the profession and its work on behalf of students by sharing information, expertise, ideas, encouragement, dialog and inspiration widely via a variety of social media channels. After an open nomination period, the Social Media Recognition Task Force is proud to announce the following finalists in each category. Through April 14, members of the school library community and the public are invited to post endorsements of their personal superstar by leaving a comment on each category’s post.

Article: Is this Auckland's most influential woman? How did an expat South African PR dynamo become one of Auckland’s most influential women? Greg Bruce meets the force that is Deborah Pead. From the moment I first agreed to write about Deborah Pead, even before I spoke to her for the first time, I could feel her taking control of what I said about her. I didn't see any way to prevent it. I decided to not try.

Teaching Information Literacy Now Last week, a new study from Stanford University revealed that many students are inept at discerning fact from opinion when reading articles online. The report, combined with the spike in fake and misleading news during the 2016 election, has school librarians, including me, rethinking how we teach evaluation of online sources to our students. How can we educate our students to evaluate the information they find online when so many adults are sharing inaccurate articles on social media? While social media isn’t the only reason for the surge in fake news over the last 10 years, it’s certainly making it harder for information consumers of every age to sort through fact and fiction. As articles about the Stanford study get shared around Facebook, I have two thoughts. One, I have to teach this better.

Article: Trump vs. the media Boston—Not many months ago I was among the millions of moviegoers transfixed and inspired by the work of a small team of journalists at The Boston Globe – the Spotlight Team – who in 2002 told the shocking story of pedophile priests whose vile acts were routinely protected by the Roman Catholic Church’s hierarchy. The team’s effort not only won journalism’s highest award, the Pulitzer Prize Gold Medal, but also ignited a global attack on such pedophilia. Theater audiences like mine cheered as the “Spotlight” film credits rolled. I had watched through teary eyes the film’s climactic scene – so familiar to newspaper movies – in which the monstrous presses churn out paper bundles for circulation trucks that fan out across the region delivering the edition containing the story. As a journalist for most of my adult life, my heart swelled with pride.

SchoolJournalism.org : News, Information and Media Literacy The onset of the digital age forever changed the way readers interact with news and the way that journalists do journalism. Now that more data is produced in a single second that can possibly be consumed in a lifetime, the need for news literacy has never been more important. Simply put, news literacy is the ability to use critical thinking skills to judge the reliability and credibility of news reports and information sources. As 21st Century citizens, we must know what is in the news we consume — where to get the news, what to do with it and how to make news of our own. Want to learn more? Take a look at:

Article: My ‘fake news list’ went viral. But made-up stories are only part of the problem. Fake news spreads easily on Facebook. (Reuters/Dado Ruvic) For years, I have rolled my eyes at news headlines on Facebook. Fake-news search engine tracks spread of lies - CNET Now you can map the web of lies. A beta version of Hoaxy, a search engine designed to track fake news, was released Wednesday by Indiana University's Network Science Institute and its Center for Complex Networks and System Research. Hoaxy indexes stories from 132 sites known to produce fake news, such as WashingtonPost.com.co and MSNBC.website, and allows you to see how these sites' links spread across social media. Fake news has plagued the internet and social networks for a long time but has grown in prominence in the past year or so, forcing Facebook to introduce new features to flag false articles.

Libguide: Harvard Library research guide Skip to main content Fake News, Misinformation, and Propaganda This guide offers a brief introduction to the spread of misinformation of all kinds and tools for identifying it, and reading the news with a more informed eye A Visual Take Library Resources Web Evaluation: Does This Website Smell Funny to You? One of my friends spent this past weekend working with her 2nd grade daughter on a research project. While her daughter flew through the arts and crafts portion and was able to handwrite the “sloppy copy” of her presentation, she struggled when it came to typing the final draft. She didn’t know where the period was.

Article: We Tracked Down A Fake-News Creator In The Suburbs. Here's What We Learned : All Tech Considered "The whole idea from the start was to build a site that could kind of infiltrate the echo chambers of the alt-right." Fanatic Studio/Getty Images hide caption toggle caption Fanatic Studio/Getty Images "The whole idea from the start was to build a site that could kind of infiltrate the echo chambers of the alt-right." A lot of fake and misleading news stories were shared across social media during the election.

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