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Historians may look to 2015 as the year when shit really started hitting the fan. Some snapshots: In just the past few months, record-setting heat waves in Pakistan and India each killed more than 1,000 people. In Washington state's Olympic National Park, the rainforest caught fire for the first time in living memory. London reached 98 degrees Fahrenheit during the hottest July day ever recorded in the U.K.; The Guardian briefly had to pause its live blog of the heat wave because its computer servers overheated. In California, suffering from its worst drought in a millennium, a 50-acre brush fire swelled seventyfold in a matter of hours, jumping across the I-15 freeway during rush-hour traffic. Then, a few days later, the region was pounded by intense, virtually unheard-of summer rains. Hansen's new study also shows how complicated and unpredictable climate change can be. Eighty-year-old Roger Thomas runs whale-watching trips out of San Francisco. But their situation is precarious.

http://www.rollingstone.com/politics/news/the-point-of-no-return-climate-change-nightmares-are-already-here-20150805

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50 Doomiest Graphs of 2010 The Graph of the Day feature comprises Desdemona’s assault on the left hemisphere of the brain, in the quixotic quest against delusional hope. This post complements the media barrage on the right hemisphere, 50 Doomiest Photos of 2010. 2010 yielded a torrent of new scientific data that documents the accelerating destruction of the biosphere, and Desdemona managed to capture a few graphs from the flood.

If This Timeline Doesn't Convince You Climate Change Is Real, Nothing Will With today's news that August broke global temperature records, it's useful to consider how much our world's climate has changed over the years. A fantastic new timeline created on the web comic xkcd does exactly this. xkcd is of course the long-running, much-adored ongoing creation of Randall Munroe, an artist, physicist, and former NASA roboticist. Since 2005, Munroe has used his web comic to illustrate all sorts of scientific and nerdy concepts in really hilarious and insightful ways, from graphs showing which sci-fi futures are still possible, to infographics showing how many model rockets you'd need to get to space, to the "Ballmer Peak" showing the productivity of drunken programming. He even has an asteroid named after him.

Will EPA Heed the Pope's Call to Save Our Oceans? When it comes to saving our oceans, I'm wondering: What would Pope Francis do? With his sprawling encyclical on the fate of our planet this month, the pope became an unexpected revolutionary. I never thought I'd see bold environmental leadership arise from this powerful, historically conservative institution. By now, everyone knows about his call to fight climate change, ocean acidification, pollution and loss of the planet's biodiversity.

Sea Level Bombshell Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images In what may prove to be a turning point for political action on climate change, a breathtaking new study casts extreme doubt about the near-term stability of global sea levels. The study—written by James Hansen, NASA’s former lead climate scientist, and 16 co-authors, many of whom are considered among the top in their fields—concludes that glaciers in Greenland and Antarctica will melt 10 times faster than previous consensus estimates, resulting in sea level rise of at least 10 feet in as little as 50 years. The study, which has not yet been peer-reviewed, brings new importance to a feedback loop in the ocean near Antarctica that results in cooler freshwater from melting glaciers forcing warmer, saltier water underneath the ice sheets, speeding up the melting rate.

Obama unveils major climate change proposal - CNNPolitics.com "Today after working with states and cities and power companies, the EPA is setting the first ever nationwide standards to end the limitless dumping of carbon pollution from power plants," Obama said Monday from the White House, adding shortly thereafter "Washington is starting to catch up with the vision of the rest of the country. " The "Clean Power Plan" is the final version of regulations by the Environmental Protection Agency, which President Barack Obama called "the biggest most important step we've ever taken to combat climate change," in a video released by the White House on social media Saturday night.

Study: One-tenth of Earth's wilderness lost since the 1990s It’s a bleak revelation — a new study reveals that about a tenth of the Earth’s wilderness has been lost since the 1990s. Over the last 20 years, a total area half the size of the Amazon and twice the size of Alaska has been depleted. The researchers behind the study, published in the journal Current Biology, say they hope that the sobering revelation that rich natural habitats like the Amazon have been decimated in a relatively short amount of time will act as a wakeup call to global leaders to emphasize conservation efforts in their environmental protection policies. How will ocean acidification impact marine life? Many marine organisms—such as coral, clams, mussels, sea urchins, barnacles, and certain microscopic plankton—rely on equilibrated chemical conditions and pH levels in the ocean to build their calcium-based shells and other structures. A new analysis published in the journal Environmental Science and Technology provides a holistic analysis of how species will be affected worldwide under different climate scenarios. "Calcifying species are indispensable for ecosystems worldwide: they provide nursery habitats for fish, food for marine predators, and natural defenses for storms and erosion. These species are also particularly vulnerable to ocean acidification triggered by increased fossil fuel emissions," says IIASA researcher Ligia Azevedo, who led the study.

New Technology to Capture, Convert Carbon Dioxide The intricate, highly porous structure of covalent organic frameworks makes them uniquely suited for capturing carbon dioxide. Although progress has been made in limiting carbon emissions in some countries, particularly in Europe and North America, it’s clear that finding ways to capture carbon dioxide from smokestacks—or from the atmosphere—is becoming increasingly imperative. Available systems dramatically increase the cost of electricity from plants equipped with the technology. And what to do with all that carbon dioxide after it’s separated remains problematic. Now a team of scientists at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and the University of California, Berkeley, have devised a method that uses super-porous molecular structures known as covalent organic frameworks, with catalysts to convert the carbon dioxide to carbon monoxide, which can be used in making a range of materials including fuels, plastics, and even pharmaceuticals.

Carbon Release Rate Record Humanity is pumping climate-warming carbon dioxide into the atmosphere 10 times faster than at any point in the past 66m years, according to new research. The revelation shows the world has entered “uncharted territory” and that the consequences for life on land and in the oceans may be more severe than at any time since the extinction of the dinosaurs. It comes as the World Meteorological Organisation released its Status of the Climate Report detailing a string of weather and climate records that were broken in 2015. “The future is happening now,” said WMO secretary-general Petteri Taalas in a statement released alongside the report. “The alarming rate of change we are now witnessing in our climate as a result of greenhouse gas emission is unprecedented in modern records.”

Climate Impacts on Human Health Climate Impacts on Human Health Climate Impacts on Alaska Key Points A warmer climate is expected to both increase the risk of heat-related illnesses and death and worsen conditions for air quality.

Osef, je vais à puget chez mon Grand père, suis un peu en auteur. Et si la plage peut se rapprocher de la maison... by nicolas Sep 23

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