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Why Curation Is Just as Important as Creation [OPINION]

Why Curation Is Just as Important as Creation [OPINION]

http://mashable.com/2011/03/17/curation-importance/

Related:  Digital CurationCuratorial CuriosityCONTENT CURATION

Five Content Curation Mistakes B2B Marketers Are Making Content. If you're a B2B marketer today, the odds are good that you've been using it for lead generation and brand awareness. Research from the Content Marketing Institute and MarketingProfs finds that 95% of enterprise B2Bs are practicing content marketing, which means there's a lot of content out there. And yet the demand for content has never been greater. It's impossible for marketers to create enough original, quality material for each channel every day, which is why many rely on content curation to help build brand awareness and generate leads via social media and email marketing.

The 5 Models Of Content Curation Curation has always been an underrated form of creation. The Getty Center in Los Angeles is one of the most frequently visited museums in America – and started as a private art collection from one man (J. Paul Getty) who had a passion for art. Aside from a few well known examples like this one, however, the term curation has rarely been used outside of the world of art … until now. One of the hottest trends in social media right now is content curation – thanks in no small part to the leading efforts of several thought leaders actively promoting the idea. Curation: Creatively Filtering Content We are living in an era of information overload. So much content is shared online that curation is needed as a way to get value out of the information flood. Content curation is the process of shifting through the vast abundance of content on the Internet to select the best, most relevant resource, on a specific topic or theme, so that we can organize, manage and collate the content for ourselves and share with others. Content curation is about working smarter and not harder. Content curation is also a reflective process; as you curate resources you reflect on their value.

Why Curation Is Important to the Future of Journalism Josh Sternberg is the founder of Sternberg Strategic Communications and authors The Sternberg Effect. You can follow him on Twitter and Tumblr. Over the past few weeks, many worries about the death of journalism have, well, died. NeboBlog: Interactive Marketing, Design & Ramblings. Brought to you by NeboWeb As more and more people and brands take to producing digital content, a group of individuals has arisen with the goal of filtering the wheat from the chaff. I had the pleasure of interviewing the curator of the popular site Brain Pickings, Maria Popova, and picking her brain on this topic. The role of people like Maria will only become more important in the future, and her insights are well-worth consideration. If you have questions for Maria, feel free to leave them in the comments or send her a tweet. Enjoy. Tell us a little bit about yourself and what you do.

Content Curation: Beyond the Institutional Repository and Library Archives - Personal Knowledge Management for Academia & Librarians If you are an academic librarian, you have been hearing about Data Curation, Content Curation, Information Curation or Digital Curation for years. And the terms can be applied in several different ways. There are the curation activities surrounding purchased library materials and the curation of faculty and student items (like theses and dissertations for example). Archivists have been intimately involved with all sorts of curation activities since archives existed, and were early adopters of digital curation and finding aids for the items they maintained. Most recently, Data Curation has been in the forefront of librarian discussions in response to government mandates to make research information widely available; first with the medical field, and more recently with the National Science Foundation requirements for data curation plans in all NSF grants. Clay Shirky (www.shirky.com) suggests that “[the problem] is not information overload.

Content Curation and the Interest Graph: Delivering Context to the Consumer In December, an article I wrote "Content Is King, But Distribution Is Queen and She Wears the Pants" was nominated and won an end-of-the-year contest for the best content marketing post of 2013. The contest was run by a new startup called ShareBloc, a new content distribution platform for professionals to share and curate content. The original post identified the growing problem of content saturation on the Internet. Good distribution — whether paid or earned — can help content marketers cut through that noise. Looking back on the merits of ShareBloc's contest, I'd add an addendum to that winning post: Consumers who are good at content curation will benefit the most from marketers deploying distribution strategies. Today's social media and content distribution platforms are content curation engines at their core.

Seven Things Human Editors Do that Algorithms Don't (Yet) - Eli Pariser - The Conversation by Eli Pariser | 10:20 AM May 26, 2011 A recommendation from the recommendation frontier: You may not want to fire your human editor just yet. For the last year, I’ve been investigating the weird, wild, mostly hidden world of personalization for my book, The Filter Bubble. The “if you like this, you’ll like that” mentality is sweeping the web — not just on sites like Amazon and Netflix that deal with products, but also on sites that deal with news and content like Google search (users are increasingly likely to get different results depending on who they are) and Yahoo News. Even the New York Times and the Washington Post are getting in on the act, investing in startups that provide a “Daily Me” approach to the newspaper. The business logic behind this race to personalize is quite simple: if you can draw on the vast amount of information users often unwittingly provide to deliver more personally relevant content, your visitors have a better experience and keep coming back.

Some thoughts on curation – adding context and telling stories « Derivadow.com Just over two years ago I wrote a post about the importance of the resource and the URL — and I still stand by what I said there: the core of a website should be the resource and its URL. And if those resources describe real world things and they are linked together in the way people think about the world then you can navigate the site by hopping from resource to resource in an intuitive fashion. But I think I missed something important in that post — the role of curation, the role of storytelling. When we started work on Wildlife Finder we designed the site around the core concepts that we knew people cared about and those that we had content about i.e. species, their habitats and adaptations, and we’ve been publishing resources about those concepts since last September. We’ve since published the model (Wildlife Ontology) describing how those concepts relate together. Like this:

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