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Pearltrees: What problem does Pearltrees solve

I find Pearltrees to be one of the most exciting platforms of the moment, especially if you are collaborating with people who are in other countries. Also been interested in comparing automated curating (such as paper.li) with the manual curating which seems to be the heart of Pearltrees. Did an interesting interview with the tech evangelist of pearltrees at Leweb10. Great European start-up. Made an interview with the founders during leweb10 in Paris. I understand the rumours are still quite strong that Yahoo wants to get rid of the collaborative bookmarking tool Delicious. Since then I have been looking for three things: - a method to keep and sort stuff I find on the web in a logical way, especially related videos. - a method to share those collections with others and share bits of it with others who subscribe to an alert service I run for clients. - a method to dynamically display the results, so that any updates are also reflected. Downsides?

http://www.quora.com/Pearltrees/What-problem-does-Pearltrees-solve

Related:  Content CurationUsers for ideas...TémoignagesPearltree MiscCuratorial Curiosity

The web's third frontier Patrice Lamothe, CEO of Pearltrees October 22, 2010 Everyone realizes that the web is entering a new phase in its development. One indication of this transition is the proliferation of attempts to explain the changes that are occurring. Functional explanations emphasize the “real time web,” collaborative systems such as Wave, and the growth of localized social networks such as Foursquare. These technical explanations argue that the interconnectivity of data is the most significant current development.

Learn from your customers for usable Web apps Imagine the following scenario: You go shopping to buy a loaf of bread. The shops look gorgeous, decked out in vivid colors and stunning artwork. Trouble is, you can't always tell from the window displays what sort of products are on sale inside. Eventually, you find a shop that looks promising and ignore advice that this store's expertise is with a gadget you don't own. You find the front door and wander in. When is the social curation bubble going to burst? You just can’t move for social curation services right now. The biggest noise might be coming from Pinterest, which is growing like a weed — but whether it’s the new-look Delicious, Switzerland’s Paperli, shopping curation site Svpply, image service Mlkshk or another site, the fact is that almost everybody seems to want to help you save and sort and share the things you find on the web right now. With this swirl of activity, then, it’s no surprise to hear that Parisian service Pearltrees — slogan “collect, organize, discover” — has just raised another $6 million of funding, led by local conglomerate Groupe Accueil. The company, which has been running in public since 2009, welcomed the injection of funds as a way to help expand and scale up its system for bookmarking and organizing, which is based around a clustered visual interface. And it needs that scale.

Peartrees: Multi-dimensional Curation A few weeks ago now, I posted an opinion piece on Technorati titled, 'Why Social Media Curation Matters'. Following this I received quite a lot of feedback and it’s thanks to one of these comments – posted by on my blog – that I was led to Pearltrees. In addition to this, I was also motivated to re-evaluate my position on the subject of curation and take a closer look at what I perceived that to be. At first I made the rather naïve assumption that the difference between Pearltrees and the services I’d discussed in my previous articles both here and on my blog, was purely aesthetic – Pearltrees has a beautifully designed Flash interface. However, as I delved further into the service, and further contemplated readers' feedback, I began to realise that there were actually some fundamental differences both in the approach of the developers and in my perception of curation. Nonetheless, they are just lists.

Bookmarks: Soon Obsolete? Since the Web first came online in 1991, it has grown and improved beyond anyone's predictions. Unlike the gray background, mono-spaced text and ugly graphics on the Web in those early years, today's Web is rich with video, interactive applications and other useful and distracting goodies. But even after all these years, the way we find, navigate and save content on the Web works pretty much like it always did.

Founding principles Patrice Lamothe, CEO of Pearltrees, November 2008 A short description of Pearltrees Pearltrees is a collaborative project enabling Internet users to become editors of the Web, i.e. to visualize, organize and share their navigations. By building their own Web, they collectively build the living map of the entire Web. Context The development of content creation, sharing and discussion sites has radically transformed the practice of Internet users.

PT version 1 et 2 Connected. This pad seems to be opened in more than one browser window on this computer. Reconnect to use this window instead. Your permissions have changed while viewing this page. 6 reasons to use Pearltrees Pearltrees is the first and largest social curation community on the Internet. It’s a place to organize, discover and share all the cool content you find online. However, beyond this basic definition, a question remains: why would I want to use Pearltrees? Well, what I want to share with you are six major use cases (or reasons) we’ve identified as being most popular across our entire community of web curators.

Pearltrees - Visually Organize and Share Collections of Files and Links Pearltrees is a visual bookmarking tool that I first tried nearly five years ago. Over the years it has changed in response to feedback from its users. One of those changes was a transition from free-form webs of related files and links to its current format of visual squares and folders. I'm a big fan of the current format. Pearltrees now allows you to organize collections of links, videos, images, and files. Pearltrees releases a new version, without any pearls nor trees The Paris-based startup founded in 2009 once declared: “We focus on the visual potential of Pearltrees to let people dive deeply into their interests and nearly feel them”. Their product, offering a digital curation tool, was unique because of the visual interface voluntareely original: links and folders symbolized by rounded pearls attached together like the branches of a tree. Today, pearls and trees have disappeared to make room for a brand new and larger organisation tool. Two years ago, everyone wanted to build products around “curation” and “interest graph”. Today the keywords have shifted to “collaborative SaaS tool” and “organizing data”. Pearltrees, who has raised €8,5 million in two rounds, is renewing itself to match the new trends by releasing a new version focused on organization of collections in a more “obvious” way.

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