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Content Strategy: How and Why to Curate Content

Content Strategy: How and Why to Curate Content
Most of us understand the value of sharing information. But when the information belongs to others, we wonder “what’s the point?” Yet, as massive amounts of information abound, the art of content curation can help us provide resources to our audiences while positing ourselves as an authority. Here’s how. Curate When You Can't Create It takes more than just words to create content. Where do you turn to find new ideas or inspiration? Pointing others away from your site shouldn’t be regarded as poor marketing, but rather as a savvy way to position yourself and your company as an industry authority. Additionally, sharing secondary resources says that you and your company thinks outside the box. According to Andew Hannelly in his article Needles, Haystacks, and Content Curation for The Magazine Group’s Engage blog, how a company exhibits others information is what customers will regard as their end product. How did you present it to them? The Wisdom on Curated Content

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Content Strategy: Exploring Content Curation Tools Content curation has been getting a lot of attention recently. We’ve covered what it is, why it’s valuable and offered best practices on how to curate content on your own. Yet, if management systems can be designed to manage content, why not build one to curate content? More than RSS feeds or topical searches, there are a few products that aim to help professionals gather content from around the web that’s relevant to them. Not only does this help keep track of it all, it makes it easier to collect and share with others — making it ideal for starting conversations and improving customer experience.

TEDxNYed: This is bullshit « BuzzMachine Here are my notes for my talk to the TEDxNYed gathering this past weekend. I used the opportunity of a TED event to question the TED format, especially in relation to education, where — as in media — we must move past the one-way lecture to collaboration. I feared I’d get tomatoes — organic — thrown at me at the first line, but I got laugh and so everything we OK from there. The video won’t be up for a week or two so I’ll share my notes.

Content Curation versus Content Creation As many of us know, in the social media marketing game content is king! Without anything to Tweet about or post about on Facebook our communities would fall by the wayside and our customers would stop listening to us. For most brands, the first question that must be answered before starting a social media strategy is “Where do we find good content to post about?” Creating content can be very expensive and time consuming. The Content Strategist as Digital Curato The term “curate” is the interactive world’s new buzzword. During content creation and governance discussions, client pitches and creative brainstorms, I’ve watched this word gain traction at almost warp speed. As a transplant from museums and libraries into interactive media, I can’t help but ask what is it about this word that deserves redefinition for the web? Article Continues Below Curation has a distinguished history in cultural institutions.

Real Time Twitter Curation ‘Curation’ is a topic of many a conversation these days – from media properties to bloggers to even brands looking to add value to the story they tell and service they provide to their audience. However, the question of how to best record and track a real-time conversation stream related to a particular topic is still tricky – particularly in a continually-updated Twitter stream. Proposing to help resolve the need for real-time curation is Curated.by, a soon-to-launch Twitter curation tool that facilitates cataloging and sharing collections of messages on any topic. How it works: create a collection (say, ‘networked objects’) and drag related Tweets into it, or use the service’s new Chrome Extension to curate Tweets right from Twitter web pages. You can then share your collections, embed them on a web page and subscribe to the collections of other users. Curated.by

Five models of content curation I’d love you to take a look at this post by Rohit Bhargava: Five Models of Content Curation. I think he is spot on with his five models, which I’ll list below. This is a pretty good deconstruction of how we actively curate content for you here on SocialFishing, and it’s a useful way to think about particular kinds of posts you could be posting on your association or nonprofit blog relative to your industry topics. Content curation, or the organizing, filtering and “making sense of” information, is a role every association should be focusing on very consciously by now. Let’s run through them quickly, and I’ll point to an example of each from this blog.

News curation: finally, social media's killer app? FORTUNE -- Even the most casual social network user will admit that the Facebook or Twitter experience can be overwhelming -- that merciless stream of status updates and shared content, which sometimes feels less like a stream and more like a deluge, waits for no man, woman, or Web crawler. Of course, there's good reason to feel that way: Facebookers share 30-billion plus pieces of information each month, and Twitter users output 1 billion tweets weekly. There's a tremendous amount of digital information floating around and few great solutions for filtering it, making sense of it, and consuming it. That's changing. Nicholas Negroponte foreshadowed the current state of things back in 1995 with the "Daily Me," a customized news experience, but it's only been over the last 18 months that his idea has manifested itself via mainstream products and services. They all work differently.

The Case Against Links Links - are they a net negative for readers online? That's the idea being deliberately explored by a number of publishers, says writer Nicholas Carr today. The iconoclastic author says that he has grown sympathetic to the thinking of Steve Gillmor, the almost incomprehensibly future-bound sage tech journalist who has argued for years that "links are dead." Links within articles are a distraction and imply that the reader ought to leave what they are reading to read something else, Carr says.

Real-Time News Curation, Newsmastering And Newsradars - The Complete Guide Part 1: Why We Need It The time it takes to follow and go through multiple web sites and blogs takes tangible time, and since most sources publish or give coverage to more than one topic, one gets to browse and scan through lots of useless content just for the sake of finding what is relevant to his specific interest. Even in the case of power-users utilizing RSS feed readers, aggregators and filters, the amount of junk we have to sift through daily is nothing but impressive, so much so, that those who have enough time and skills to pick the gems from that ocean of tweets, social media posts and blog posts, enjoy a fast increasing reputation and visibility online. Photo credit: dsharpie and franckreporter mashed up by Robin Good "What we need to get much better at is scaling that system so you don't have to pay attention to everything, but you don't miss the stuff you care about..."

Ten Steps To Build A Basic Content Hub Using the Web to build your brand is less and less about creating destinations, and more and more about creating content useful to the people you want to reach, then empowering them to access that content wherever and however they like. The key to this is creating something we call a “content hub.” A content hub is more than just a standalone site or application, it’s both the heart of a distributed network of information, and a destination for those that share the interest it supports. Rather than explain the theory of a content hub in detail, it’s best to just build a quick-and-dirty one, and use it. Here’s the process I’d recommend to do exactly that:

Curating the Best of the Web: Video The Internet is awash in content — and a whole lot of it is junk, spam or inane status updates. How do you begin to navigate through the zillions of news articles, Web sites, tweets and other stuff online to find content that matters to you? You need digital curators. To see the full article, subscribe here. Forecast 2020: Web 3.0+ and Collective Intelligence « simple processes “We know what we are, but we know not what we may become” – Shakespeare The ancient Chinese curse or saying — “May you live in interesting times.” — is upon us. We are in the midst of a new revolution fueled by advancements in the Internet and technology. Currently, there is an abundance of information and the size of social interaction has reached a colossal scale.

The Seven Needs of Real-Time Curators I keep hearing people throw around the word “curation” at various conferences, most recently at SXSW. The thing is most of the time when I dig into what they are saying they usually have no clue about what curation really is or how it could be applied to the real-time world. So, over the past few months I’ve been talking to tons of entrepreneurs about the tools that curators actually need and I’ve identified seven things.

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