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Content Strategy: How and Why to Curate Content

Content Strategy: How and Why to Curate Content
Most of us understand the value of sharing information. But when the information belongs to others, we wonder “what’s the point?” Yet, as massive amounts of information abound, the art of content curation can help us provide resources to our audiences while positing ourselves as an authority. Here’s how. Curate When You Can't Create It takes more than just words to create content. Where do you turn to find new ideas or inspiration? Pointing others away from your site shouldn’t be regarded as poor marketing, but rather as a savvy way to position yourself and your company as an industry authority. Additionally, sharing secondary resources says that you and your company thinks outside the box. According to Andew Hannelly in his article Needles, Haystacks, and Content Curation for The Magazine Group’s Engage blog, how a company exhibits others information is what customers will regard as their end product. How did you present it to them? The Wisdom on Curated Content Related:  Online Content Curation

Content Strategy: Exploring Content Curation Tools Content curation has been getting a lot of attention recently. We’ve covered what it is, why it’s valuable and offered best practices on how to curate content on your own. Yet, if management systems can be designed to manage content, why not build one to curate content? More than RSS feeds or topical searches, there are a few products that aim to help professionals gather content from around the web that’s relevant to them. Not only does this help keep track of it all, it makes it easier to collect and share with others — making it ideal for starting conversations and improving customer experience. Curating content is a great way to show the relevance of specific topics within an industry and it’s also a great way to establish trust with your audience. Scoop.it Launched in Beta in late 2010, Scoop.it plays both boomarklet and curator. The Scoop.it site showcases the most popular topics and the top curators, allowing for a curation community to be formed. Paper.li Curata Useful article?

TEDxNYed: This is bullshit « BuzzMachine Here are my notes for my talk to the TEDxNYed gathering this past weekend. I used the opportunity of a TED event to question the TED format, especially in relation to education, where — as in media — we must move past the one-way lecture to collaboration. I feared I’d get tomatoes — organic — thrown at me at the first line, but I got laugh and so everything we OK from there. The video won’t be up for a week or two so I’ll share my notes. This is bullshit. Why should you be sitting there listening to me? But right now, you’re the audience and I’m lecturing. That’s bullshit. What does this remind of us of? What else does this remind us of? But we must question this very form. I, too, like lots of TED talks. During the latest meeting of Mothership TED, I tweeted that I didn’t think I had ever seen any TEDster tweet anything negative about a talk given there, so enthralled are they all for being there, I suppose. Validation. Good God, that’s the last thing we should want. They also repeat.

Real Time Twitter Curation ‘Curation’ is a topic of many a conversation these days – from media properties to bloggers to even brands looking to add value to the story they tell and service they provide to their audience. However, the question of how to best record and track a real-time conversation stream related to a particular topic is still tricky – particularly in a continually-updated Twitter stream. Proposing to help resolve the need for real-time curation is Curated.by, a soon-to-launch Twitter curation tool that facilitates cataloging and sharing collections of messages on any topic. How it works: create a collection (say, ‘networked objects’) and drag related Tweets into it, or use the service’s new Chrome Extension to curate Tweets right from Twitter web pages. You can then share your collections, embed them on a web page and subscribe to the collections of other users. Curated.by [via Scobleizer and ReadWriteWeb]

Five models of content curation I’d love you to take a look at this post by Rohit Bhargava: Five Models of Content Curation. I think he is spot on with his five models, which I’ll list below. This is a pretty good deconstruction of how we actively curate content for you here on SocialFishing, and it’s a useful way to think about particular kinds of posts you could be posting on your association or nonprofit blog relative to your industry topics. Content curation, or the organizing, filtering and “making sense of” information, is a role every association should be focusing on very consciously by now. Let’s run through them quickly, and I’ll point to an example of each from this blog. Aggregation – There is a flood of information online and Google can only give you a best guess at the most relevant, but there are millions and millions of pages returned for any search result. This one’s a no-brainer – try my Link Love Monthly on for size. It’s possible that I don’t do this one very well, though I really love the concept.

Real-Time News Curation, Newsmastering And Newsradars - The Complete Guide Part 1: Why We Need It The time it takes to follow and go through multiple web sites and blogs takes tangible time, and since most sources publish or give coverage to more than one topic, one gets to browse and scan through lots of useless content just for the sake of finding what is relevant to his specific interest. Even in the case of power-users utilizing RSS feed readers, aggregators and filters, the amount of junk we have to sift through daily is nothing but impressive, so much so, that those who have enough time and skills to pick the gems from that ocean of tweets, social media posts and blog posts, enjoy a fast increasing reputation and visibility online. Photo credit: dsharpie and franckreporter mashed up by Robin Good "What we need to get much better at is scaling that system so you don't have to pay attention to everything, but you don't miss the stuff you care about..." Thematic and topic-specific news channels have greater affinity with the natural flow of information on the Internet. The Problem

Ten Steps To Build A Basic Content Hub | Holland-Mark Blog Using the Web to build your brand is less and less about creating destinations, and more and more about creating content useful to the people you want to reach, then empowering them to access that content wherever and however they like. The key to this is creating something we call a “content hub.” A content hub is more than just a standalone site or application, it’s both the heart of a distributed network of information, and a destination for those that share the interest it supports. Rather than explain the theory of a content hub in detail, it’s best to just build a quick-and-dirty one, and use it. Here’s the process I’d recommend to do exactly that: If you don’t have a GMail account, create one, say acme@gmail.com. The “hub” of the system is your new GMail account. To distribute original content through the system, just use the Posterous account. “Curating” content is even easier. You can also access your brand “listening station” in Google Reader. So what happens now? Start posting.

The Seven Needs of Real-Time Curators I keep hearing people throw around the word “curation” at various conferences, most recently at SXSW. The thing is most of the time when I dig into what they are saying they usually have no clue about what curation really is or how it could be applied to the real-time world. So, over the past few months I’ve been talking to tons of entrepreneurs about the tools that curators actually need and I’ve identified seven things. But NONE of the real time tools/systems like Google Buzz, Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, Flickr, give curators the tools that they need to do their work efficiently. As you read these things they were ordered (curated) in this order for a reason. This is a guide for how we can build “info molecules” that have a lot more value than the atomic world we live in now. Thousands of these atoms flow across our screens in tools like Seesmic, Google Reader, Tweetdeck, Tweetie, Simply Tweet, Twitroid, etc. A curator is an information chemist. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 1. 1.

6 Content Curation Examples Illustrated - HiveFire on Content Curation As 2011 online marketing and social media predictions start rolling in, we are hearing more and more about curation and how it’s going to be huge every day. But most of the discussion is conceptual and theoretical, talking about information overload and parallels to curation in museums. To help demonstrate what content curation actually means in the flesh, I have compiled a list of a 6 illustrated examples of curation in action by marketers, publishers and every day consumers. 1. Curation for Category Creation by Novell Intelligent workload management (IWM) is an emerging method of IT systems management arising that draws from dynamic infrastructure, virtualization, identity management, and software appliance development. 2. The Big Apple Circus has created a section of their website for videos. 3. 4. Bio-IT World Weekly is a newsletter produced by the Cambridge Healthtech Institute (CHI) that reaches 35,000 readers. 5. One of most well known examples of curation is Digg. 6.

Squidoo’s Introduces Social Media Curation Through Brands in Public Brands in Public is a collection of interesting, accessible, public-facing dashboards for your favorite brands – from Zappos to Virgin America to In-n-Out Burger. Each dashboard organizes a hot list of what’s being said about the brand around the web, via Twitter and blogs and YouTube and Google Trends and more. As well as polls and debates and commenting for people who want to do more than just watch. – is how Squidoo welcomes visitors now, promoting its latest feature calledBrands in Public. Squidoo of course is marketing maven Seth Godin’s product which falls somewhere between aggregation, article writing and blogging. However, while it had its share of users, Squidoo in my opinion could never create the same buzz that most of Godin’s books did and still do. This week Godin in his blog introduced the above mentioned Brands in Public feature to Squidoo. Why would a company pay $400 a month to Squidoo? For the same reasons that people set up lenses for free.

Why Content Curation Is Here to Stay Steve Rosenbaum is the CEO of Magnify.net, a video Curation and Publishing platform. Rosenbaum is a blogger, video maker and documentarian. You can follow him on Twitter @magnify and read more about Curation at CurationNation.org. For website content publishers and content creators, there's a debate raging as to the rights and wrongs of curation. While content aggregation has been around for a while with sites using algorithms to find and link to content, the relatively new practice of editorial curation — human filtering and organizing — has created what I'm dubbing, "The Great Creationism Debate." The debate pits creators against curators, asking big questions about the rules and ethical questions around content aggregation. In trying to understand the issue and the new emerging rules, I reached out to some of the experts who are weighing in on how curation could help creators and web users have a better online experience. The Issues at Hand Who are curators? Where We Stand Now

Digital curation The term curation in the past commonly referred to museum and library professionals. It has since been applied to interaction with social media including compiling digital images, web links and movie files. Approaches to digital curation[edit] The Digital Curation Centre is a "world leading centre of expertise in digital information curation"[5] that assists higher education research institutions. The DCC is based in the UK and began operations in early 2004. The following is a general outline of their approach to digital curation: Conceptualize: Consider what digital material you will be creating and develop storage options. Sheer curation[edit] Sheer curation is an approach to digital curation where curation activities are quietly integrated into the normal work flow of those creating and managing data and other digital assets. A similar idea is curation at source used in the context of Laboratory Information Management Systems LIMS. Channelisation[edit] See also[edit] References[edit]

Jonathan Stray: In 2011, news orgs will finally start to move past the borders of their own content Editor’s Note: We’re wrapping up 2010 by asking some of the smartest people in journalism what the new year will bring. Today, our predictor is Jonathan Stray, interactive technology editor for the Associated Press and a familiar byline here at the Lab. His subject: the building of new multi-source information products, and whether it’ll be news organizations that do the building. 2011 will be the year that news organizations finally start talking about integrated products designed to serve the complete information needs of consumers, but it won’t be the year that they ship them. News used to be more or less whatever news organizations published and broadcast. Unencumbered by such tribalism — and lacking content creation behemoths of their own — the information technology industry has long understood the value of curating multiple sources, including traditional news content. But as of yet, there are few integrated products. This is also about being multi-platform.

Real-Time News Curation - The Complete Guide Part 6: The Tools Universe Real-Time News Curation: Part 6 - The Tools and Technologies In this part of the guide you will find: 1. A Brief History of News Curation Tools 2. 3. 4. 5. "I've spent a good deal of time searching for a word other than "Curation" in part because of the connection to museums (which I feared sounded elitist and historic). 1) A Brief History of News Curation Tools The first news curation tools that I am aware of came out in late 2004 - early 2005, reflecting from the very beginning a growing need for both small publishers as well as for medium and large content publishers to be able to aggregate, filter and manually re-order and select the specific content items to be published in a news channel. MySyndicaat, whose parent company, Kipcast has now grown into a multi-faceted service providing advanced news aggregation and republishing widgets for online brands and media companies, has been the true pioneer of this space. With both tools the hard part is knowing "how to do" things. b. filter and

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