background preloader

Digital Anatomist Interactive Atlases

Digital Anatomist Interactive Atlases
Structural Informatics GroupDepartment of Biological StructureUniversity of Washington Seattle, Washington, USA Atlases Content: 2-D and 3-D views of the brain from cadaver sections, MRI scans, and computer reconstructions.Author: John W. SundstenInstitution: Digital Anatomist Project, Dept. Biological Structure, University of Washington, Seattle. Content: Neuroanatomy Interactive Syllabus. Atlas was formerly available on CD-ROM (JAVA program running on Mac and PC platform). Content: 3-D views of thoracic organs reconstructed from 1 mm cryosections of a cadaver specimen provided by Wolfgang Rauschning.Authors: David M. Atlas was formerly available on CD-ROM. Content: 2-D and 3-D views of the knee from cadaver sections, MRI scans, and computer recontructions.Author: Peter Ratiu and Cornelius RosseInstitution: Digital Anatomist Project, Dept. FAQHelp on Program UseSoftware Credits and CopyrightPrivacy and advertising policiesAbout the Structural Informatics Group

http://www9.biostr.washington.edu/da.html

Related:  Brain AnatomyNeuroanatomyHuman anatomyneuro-Data Science

Chapter 11: The Cerebral Cortex General Organization The cerebral cortex is the outer covering of gray matter over the hemispheres. This is typically 2- 3 mm thick, covering the gyri and sulci. Certain cortical regions have somewhat simpler functions, termed the primary cortices. These include areas directly receiving sensory input (vision, hearing, somatic sensation) or directly involved in production of limb or eye movements. The association cortices subserve more complex functions. Brain Surface and Tractography Viewer Surface Opacity: Surface Overlay Display Range: Histogram Min: Max: Minimum Track Length: The pial surface is the "outer" cortical surface and represents the boundary between gray matter and cerebrospinal fluid.

10% of the Brain Myth Let me state this very clearly: There is no scientific evidence to suggest that we use only 10% of our brains. Let's look at the possible origins of this "10% brain use" statement and the evidence that we use all of our brain. Where Did the 10% Myth Begin? How a Japanese cucumber farmer is using deep learning and TensorFlow Posted by Kaz Sato, Developer Advocate, Google Cloud Platform It’s not hyperbole to say that use cases for machine learning and deep learning are only limited by our imaginations. About one year ago, a former embedded systems designer from the Japanese automobile industry named Makoto Koike started helping out at his parents’ cucumber farm, and was amazed by the amount of work it takes to sort cucumbers by size, shape, color and other attributes. Makoto's father is very proud of his thorny cucumber, for instance, having dedicated his life to delivering fresh and crispy cucumbers, with many prickles still on them.

Functional Areas of The Cerebral Cortex We have two types of functional areas: Sensory areas •Primary Sensory Cortex – makes you aware of a sensation •Association areas – give meaning to/make associations with a sensation •Multimodal Association Areas – make associations between different types of stimuli Motor areas – allow you to act upon a sensation •Premotor Cortex – plans movements; then •Primary Motor Cortex – sends signals to generate movements •2 special motor cortices (Frontal Eye Field, Broca’s area) JCESOM Radiology Library The practice of medicine now requires physicians to understand and interpret digital images of body structure obtained by CT, MRI and ultrasound. Imaging technology has made major advances in increasing resolution and flexibility in visualization and three-dimensional reconstruction of the human body. The rapid expansion of digital data bases and systems has brought those images to the computers of doctors' offices.

Buddhism and the Brain Credit: Flickr user eschipul Over the last few decades many Buddhists and quite a few neuroscientists have examined Buddhism and neuroscience, with both groups reporting overlap. I’m sorry to say I have been privately dismissive. One hears this sort of thing all the time, from any religion, and I was sure in this case it would break down upon closer scrutiny. Brain: Brodmann Areas Brodmann Areas (BA), 10-20 Sites, Primary Functions ADD Centre, Biofeedback Institute of Toronto, American Applied NeuroScience Institute Michael Thompson, MD, James Thompson, PhD., Wu Wenqing, MD. What follows is a project-in-process. It is being done to assist the staff at our centers in their work using EEG Biofeedback (neurofeedback). It is to be a part of The Companion to The Neurofeedback Book which is being written at this time.

Online papers on consciousness Search tips There are three kinds of search you can perform: All fields This mode searches for entries containing all the entered words in their title, author, date, comment field, or in any of many other fields showing on OPC pages. Surname Mouse Brain Mapped in Greatest Detail Yet Australian scientists have created the most detailed atlas of the mouse brain, a development that is helping in the fight against brain disease. 3D surface renderings of the mouse neocortex. Color codes for all segmented regions are shown below (Jeremy F.P.

10 Great Sites for Reviewing Brain Anatomy I’ve been absolutely immersed in brain anatomy (which I now heart) for the past eight months. In the process I’ve amassed a rather large collection of links. I’ve listed some of the better resources below, hopefully others will find this helpful. The Philosophy of Neuroscience First published Mon Jun 7, 1999; substantive revision Tue May 25, 2010 Over the past three decades, philosophy of science has grown increasingly “local.” Concerns have switched from general features of scientific practice to concepts, issues, and puzzles specific to particular disciplines. Neuroanatomy—A Primer The human brain is a unique structure that boasts a complex three-dimensional architecture. Neuroscientists are only beginning to understand how the different parts of this intricate configuration work together to produce behavior. In the numerous neuroimaging studies that are published weekly, researchers use common neuroanatomical terms to denote location, organization, and, at times, implied function.

The Neuroscience of Decision Making In an attempt to put matter over mind, researchers are beginning to decipher what exactly is happening in our brains when we are making decisions. Our thoughts, though abstract and vaporous in form, are determined by the actions of specific neuronal circuits in our brains. The interdisciplinary field known as “decision neuroscience” is uncovering those circuits, thereby mapping thinking on a cellular level. Although still a young field, research in this area has exploded in the last decade, with findings suggesting it is possible to parse out the complexity of thinking into its individual components and decipher how they are integrated when we ponder.

Related: