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The 25 Biggest Turning Points in Earth's History

The 25 Biggest Turning Points in Earth's History
From fins to legs With plants well-established on land, the next step was for animals to move out of the water. Insects were among the first, around 400 million years ago. But they were followed soon after by big, backboned animals such as Tiktaalik, a fish that looked a bit like a salamander. Fish like Tiktaalik would eventually evolve four limbs, and give rise to amphibians, reptiles and mammals. It may be a good thing it left the water when it did, as soon afterwards the Late Devonian Extinction wiped out many marine animals, including some terrifying-looking armoured fish.

http://www.bbc.com/earth/bespoke/story/20150123-earths-25-biggest-turning-points/index.html

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The 100 Best, Most Interesting Blogs and Websites of 2014 Editor’s note: 2015’s list of the best, most interesting websites has arrived! The video above is a sampling from that list. Welcome to the most awesome blog post you’re going to see all year. Yep, it’s the third installment in the super-popular annual series in which I document the sites I think you’ll want to spend a lot of time on in the coming year (below you’ll find a few highlights from recent years in case you missed out). I have one major rule: a site can only appear on this list once, so there are never any duplicates. Every year this list is 100% fresh.

Free Maps of European Countries, printable, royalty free jpg You Can Download African Country Maps | Asian Country Maps | European Country Maps| Middle East Country Maps North American Country Maps | South American Country Maps | World Regional Maps Free, printable, royalty free maps that you can download to your computer for your projects UN experts denounce 'myth' pesticides are necessary to feed the world The idea that pesticides are essential to feed a fast-growing global population is a myth, according to UN food and pollution experts. A new report, being presented to the UN human rights council on Wednesday, is severely critical of the global corporations that manufacture pesticides, accusing them of the “systematic denial of harms”, “aggressive, unethical marketing tactics” and heavy lobbying of governments which has “obstructed reforms and paralysed global pesticide restrictions”. The report says pesticides have “catastrophic impacts on the environment, human health and society as a whole”, including an estimated 200,000 deaths a year from acute poisoning. Its authors said: “It is time to create a global process to transition toward safer and healthier food and agricultural production.” The world’s population is set to grow from 7 billion today to 9 billion in 2050.

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These 20 powerful photos of kids’ bedrooms will change the way you look at the world Like us on FB: Where Children Sleep is a powerful photo series by English photographer James Mollison. He traveled around the world capturing the differences between the lifestyle of kids from different countries. The discrepancy is quite shocking, as in the series you will find photos of children like Kaya from Tokyo, whose mother spends more than $1.000 a month on her dresses, as well as photos of kids from Brazil or Nepal that barely have a roof over their heads. Save the Children Italy supported the two year long process needed to complete this series that now is also available as a book, where each portrait and bedroom photos are accompanied by an extended caption that tells the story of each child. If you are interested in the book this is the Amazon link, while if you want to see some other work by James Mollison here’s his personal website: jamesmollison.com.

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