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Veneration of Mary in Roman Catholicism

Veneration of Mary in Roman Catholicism
Roman Catholic veneration of Mary, the mother of Jesus, which has grown over time in importance, is manifested not only in prayer but also in the visual arts, poetry and music.[2][3][4][5] Popes have encouraged it, while also taking steps to reform some manifestations of it.[note 1] The Holy See has insisted on the importance of distinguishing "true from false devotion, and authentic doctrine from its deformations by excess or defect".[6] There are significantly more titles, feasts and venerative Marian practices among Roman Catholics than in other Christian traditions.[7] Marian Movements and Societies with millions of members have arisen from belief in events such as Akita, Fatima and Lourdes and other reasons.[12] From Christ to Mary in the Roman Catholic tradition[edit] Theological basis for the veneration of Mary[edit] Mysteries of Christ and Mary[edit] At the centre of this mystery, in the midst of this wonderment of faith, stands Mary. From veneration to theology[edit] Related:  Mother-Earth DeitiesTHEOLOGY/WORLD RELIGIONS/SYMBOLSGods of Earth and Nature

Theotokos An 18th-century Russian icon depicting various types of the Theotokos icons Theotokos (/ˌθiəˈtɒkəs/; Greek: Θεοτόκος, transliterated (Greek) Theotókos, translation (Syriac-Aramaic): ܝܳܠܕܰܬ ܐܰܠܳܗܳܐ‎, transliterated (Syriac): Yoldath Alloho) is the Greek title of Mary, the mother of Jesus used especially in the Eastern Orthodox, Oriental Orthodox, and Eastern Catholic Churches. Its literal English translations include "God-bearer", "Birth-Giver of God" and "the one who gives birth to God." Less literal translations include "Mother of God." The ancient use of this term is emphasised in Churches of the Syriac Tradition who have been using this title in their ancient liturgies for centuries. Roman Catholics and Anglicans use the title "Mother of God" more often than "Theotokos." Etymology and usage[edit] Theotokos is a compound of two Greek words, Θεός God and τόκος parturition, childbirth. Theology[edit] Use in the early Christian Church[edit] Third Ecumenical Council[edit] Hymns[edit]

Tutelary deity A tutelary (also tutelar) is a deity or spirit who is a guardian, patron or protector of a particular place, geographic feature, person, lineage, nation, culture or occupation. Both tutelary and tutelar can be used as either a noun or an adjective. Near East and Mediterranean[edit] Ancient Greece[edit] Socrates spoke of hearing the voice of his personal spirit or daimonion: You have often heard me speak of an oracle or sign which comes to me …. The Greeks also thought deities guarded specific places: for instance, Athena was the patron goddess of the city of Athens. Ancient Rome[edit] Lararium depicting tutelary deities of the house: the ancestral Genius (center) flanked by two Lares, with a guardian serpent below Asia[edit] Kuladevis include: Thai provincial capitals have tutelary city pillars and palladiums. Americas[edit] Native American religion, (see also Animism, Shamanism) has extensive and varied systems of zoomorphic tutelaries, (also known as power animals). Africa[edit] See also[edit]

Pachamama (fertility goddess, Andes) Pachamama is a goddess revered by the indigenous people of the Andes. She is also known as the earth/time mother. [1] In Inca mythology, Mama Pacha or Pachamama is a fertility goddess who presides over planting and harvesting. She causes earthquakes and is typically in the form of a dragon. Etymology[edit] Pachamama is usually translated as Mother Earth, but a more literal translation would be "World Mother" (in Aymara and Quechua. Modern Day Rituals[edit] Pachamama and Inti are believed to be the most benevolent deities; they are worshiped in parts of the Andean mountain ranges, also known as Tawantinsuyu (the former Inca Empire) (stretching from present day Bolivia, Ecuador, Chile and northern Argentina being present day Peru the center of the empire with its capital city in Cuzco). Household Rituals[edit] The Sunday Parade[edit] A main attraction of the Pachamama festival is the Sunday parade. New Age Worship[edit] Political Usage[edit] See also[edit] Notes[edit] References[edit]

Queen of Heaven The title Queen of Heaven has long been a Catholic tradition, included in prayers and devotional literature, and seen in Western art in the subject of the Coronation of the Virgin, from the High Middle Ages, long before it was given a formal definition status by the Church. Theological basis[edit] Queen of Heaven (Latin Regina Caeli) is one of many Queen titles used of the Virgin Mary. The title derived in part from the ancient Catholic teaching that Mary, at the end of her earthly life, was bodily and spiritually assumed into heaven, and that she is there honored as Queen.[2] Pius XII explained on the theological reasons for her title of Queen in a radio message to Fatima of May 13, 1946, Bendito seja:[3] According to Catholic doctrine, Mary was assumed into heaven and is with Jesus Christ, her divine Son and is represented in the Book of Revelation (chapter 11:19–12:6) as the woman clothed with the sun who gives birth to Christ.[5] Biblical basis[edit] Historical practice[edit] Fra Angelico

Eschatology Eschatology i/ˌɛskəˈtɒlədʒi/ is a part of theology concerned with the final events of history, or the ultimate destiny of humanity. This concept is commonly referred to as the "end of the world" or "end time". The word arises from the Greek ἔσχατος eschatos meaning "last" and -logy meaning "the study of", first used in English around 1550.[1] The Oxford English Dictionary defines eschatology as "The department of theological science concerned with ‘the four last things: death, judgment, heaven and hell’."[2] In the context of mysticism, the phrase refers metaphorically to the end of ordinary reality and reunion with the Divine. History is often divided into "ages" (aeons), which are time periods each with certain commonalities. Most modern eschatology and apocalypticism, both religious and secular, involve the violent disruption or destruction of the world; whereas Christian and Jewish eschatologies view the end times as the consummation or perfection of God's creation of the world.

Mother Earth Mother Earth may refer to: Deities and concepts[edit] Written media and literature[edit] Music, movies and art pieces[edit] See also[edit] Heavenly Mother (Mormonism) The Heavenly Mother doctrine is mainly taught by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church),[1] the Restoration Church of Jesus Christ,[2][3] and branches of Mormon fundamentalism, such as the Fundamentalist Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints.[citation needed] The doctrine is not generally recognized by other faiths within the broader Latter Day Saint movement, such as the Community of Christ, where trinitarianism is predominant. In the LDS Church, the Heavenly Mother is sung about in church hymns and briefly discussed in church teaching manuals and sermons.[4] In the heavens are parents single? Some early Mormons considered Snow to be a "prophetess".[10] Later, church president Joseph F. The doctrine is also attributed to several other early church leaders. Early leader George Q. Some church leaders have interpreted the term “God” to represent the divinely exalted couple with both a masculine and feminine half. Early 20th-century church leader B.

AGNOSTICISME Un article de Wikipédia, l'encyclopédie libre. L’agnosticisme est une position philosophique considérant la vérité de certaines propositions concernant notamment l'existence de Dieu ou des dieux comme inconnaissable[1],[2] : à la différence des croyants, considérant probable ou certaine l'existence de telles divinités, ou des athées l'estimant impossible, les agnostiques refusent de trancher[3]. Si le degré de scepticisme varie selon les individus, les agnostiques s'accordent pour dire qu'il n'existe pas de preuve définitive en faveur de l'existence ou de l'inexistence du divin, et affirment l'impossibilité de se prononcer. Termes proches[modifier | modifier le code] Les termes suivants sont proches, mais néanmoins distincts, de l'agnosticisme : Étymologie[modifier | modifier le code] Positions philosophiques[modifier | modifier le code] « Peut-être qu'il sera possible, un jour, de savoir si Dieu existe ou non. Cette phrase précédente est l'ADP, ou Agnosticisme Définitif de Principe.

Terra (Roman mythology) The word tellus, telluris is also a Latin common noun for "land, territory; earth," as is terra, "earth, ground". In literary uses, particularly in poetry, it may be ambiguous as to whether the goddess, a personification, or the common noun is meant. This article preserves the usage of the ancient sources regarding Tellus or Terra. Dedicatory inscription to Terra Mater fulfilling a vow (votum), 1st century AD The two words terra and tellus are thought to derive from the formulaic phrase tersa tellus, meaning "dry land". The 4th-century AD Latin commentator Servius distinguishes between tellus and terra in usage. Varro identifies Terra Mater with Ceres: Ovid distinguishes between Tellus as the locus ("site, location") of growth, and Ceres as its causa ("cause, agent").[13] Mater, the Latin word for "mother," is often used as an honorific for goddesses, including Vesta, who was represented as a virgin. Detail from a sarcophagus depicting a Mother Earth figure (3rd century AD)

Triple Goddess (Neopaganism) The Triple Goddess is the subject of much of the writing of Robert Graves, and has been adopted by many neopagans as one of their primary deities. The term triple goddess is infrequently used outside of Neopaganism to instead refer to historical goddess triads and single goddesses of three forms or aspects. In common Neopagan usage the three female figures are frequently described as the Maiden, the Mother, and the Crone, each of which symbolizes both a separate stage in the female life cycle and a phase of the moon, and often rules one of the realms of earth, underworld, and the heavens. These may or may not be perceived as aspects of a greater single divinity. The feminine part of Wicca's duotheistic theological system is sometimes portrayed as a Triple Goddess, her masculine counterpart being the Horned God. The relationship between the neopagan Triple Goddess and ancient religion is disputed, although it is not disputed that triple goddesses were known to ancient religion.

The Labyrinth

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