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Here's what Pangea looks like mapped with modern political borders

Here's what Pangea looks like mapped with modern political borders
Kinja is in read-only mode. We are working to restore service. Does anyone know what the evolutionary/planetary/ whatever benefit to a pangea-like planet would be? It seems like things would be all lopsided, with all the earth on one side of the globe and water over the rest. Does that matter at all? Do the continents not weigh enough for it to have an impact on the world? Flagged

http://io9.com/heres-what-pangea-looks-like-mapped-with-modern-politi-509812695

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22 maps and charts that will surprise you by Ezra Klein on March 11, 2015 A good visualization helps you see what the data is telling you. The best visualizations help you you see things you never thought the data would tell you. These 22 charts and maps were, at least for me, in that category: all of them told me something I found surprising. Some of them genuinely changed the way I think about the world. More than half the world's population lives inside this circleThis map can be summed up quite simply: a ton of people live in Asia.

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July 30, 1920: Marie Tharp, the Woman who discovered the Backbone of Earth - Scientific American Blog Network Marie Tharp was born July 30, 1920 in Ypsilanti, Michigan. Already in early years she followed her father, a soil surveyor for the United States Department of Agriculture, into the field. However she also loved to read and wanted to study literature at St. John's College in Annapolis, but at the time women were not admitted there. 40 maps that explain the world Maps can be a remarkably powerful tool for understanding the world and how it works, but they show only what you ask them to. So when we saw a post sweeping the Web titled "40 maps they didn't teach you in school," one of which happens to be a WorldViews original, I thought we might be able to contribute our own collection. Some of these are pretty nerdy, but I think they're no less fascinating and easily understandable. A majority are original to this blog, with others from a variety of sources. I've included a link for further reading on close to every one. [Additional read: How Ukraine became Ukraine and 40 more maps that explain the world]

transmedia storytelling - Technology Media Telecom Transmedia Storytelling in Action In the good old days – actually, not that long ago – market development for a new product or service launch was considered to be predictable. A skilled marketing communications or PR person would contact “the media” and pitch them the same story – over, and over again. That repetition resulted in a crescendo of editorial coverage -- as that limited list of qualified journalists recited the “messaging” to their assumed to be receptive audience.

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