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The strange star that has serious scientists talking about an alien megastructure. A long exposure image showing an airplane passing in the sky during the Perseids meteor shower over the remains of a centuries old Christian basilica near the town of Pirdop, Bulgaria, early on Aug. 12.

The strange star that has serious scientists talking about an alien megastructure

(Nikolay Doychinov/AFP/Getty Images) “It was kind of unbelievable that it was real data,” said Yale University astronomer Tabetha Boyajian. “We were scratching our heads. For any idea that came up there was always something that would argue against it.” She was talking to the New Scientist about KIC 8462852, a distant star with a very unusual flickering habit.

Boyajian wrote up a paper on possible explanations for the star’s bizarre behavior, and it was published recently in the Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society. To Wright, it looked like the kind of star he and his colleagues had been waiting for. Aliens. [No, we haven’t discovered alien megastructures around a distant star] “When [Boyajian] showed me the data, I was fascinated by how crazy it looked,” Wright said. Dreamy Lunar Eclipse. + Play Audio | + Download Audio | + Join mailing list August 3, 2007: Close your eyes, breathe deeply, let your mind wander to a distant seashore: It's late in the day, and the western sun is sinking into the glittering waves. At your feet, damp sand reflects the twilight, while overhead, the deep blue sky fades into a cloudy mélange of sunset copper and gold, so vivid it almost takes your breath away.

A breeze touches the back of your neck, and you turn to see a pale full Moon rising into the night. Hmmm. The Moon could use a dash more color. Too bad it's only a dream... Early Tuesday morning, August 28th, the dream will come true. Right: Photos of the March 3, 2007, lunar eclipse. The event begins 54 minutes past midnight PDT (0754 UT) on August 28th when the Moon enters Earth's shadow. To understand why the change occurs, close your eyes and dream yourself all the way to the Moon. With the Sun blocked, you might expect utter darkness, but no, the ground at your feet is aglow. Wake up! The Archaeology of the Stars.

Space. This Year’s Finest Conjunction: Venus and Jupiter. Two brightest planets Venus and Jupiter come as close as a third of a degree apart as seen from North America.

This Year’s Finest Conjunction: Venus and Jupiter

It will be easy to spot them in the western sky as no other celestial body will outshine the beautiful tandem when the sun and the moon are down. “To the eye they’ll look like a double star,” said Kelly Beatty, a senior editor at Sky & Telescope magazine. “Anyone who hasn’t glanced at the evening sky for a while will be surprised by how dramatically tight the pairing is.” The closest conjunction will happen on June 30th and July 1st, 2015.

Use Star Walk to find your way across the sky and see the exact timing for your location. Star Walk is available worldwide on iOS, Android, Kindle and Windows Mobile.

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Astronomy. An Integral Astronomical Complex of Earthworks at Wandlebury and Hatfield Forest from the Third Millenium BC. Giant Asteroid Eclipses Star Tonight in Rare Celestial Event: How to Watch Live. An asteroid the size of Rhode Island will briefly blot out one of the brightest stars in the sky overnight tonight (March 19-20), and you can watch the rare celestial event live online, weather permitting.

Giant Asteroid Eclipses Star Tonight in Rare Celestial Event: How to Watch Live

At around 2:05 a.m. EDT (0605 GMT) Thursday morning (March 20), a 45-mile-wide (72 kilometers) asteroid 163 Erigone will eclipse Regulus, as seen from a swath of North America, making the 22nd-brightest star in the sky disappear for a few seconds. This "occultation" will be visible from the ground only to people in a narrow corridor in northeastern North America. However, the online Slooh Space Camera will offer live views of the eclipse during a show that begins at 1:45 a.m. EDT (0545 GMT) Thursday. The predicted occultation path of the bright star Regulus by the asteroid 163 Erigone on March 20, 2014 is shown in this map by Geoff Hitchcox/IOTA using Google Maps. "That's what will happen early Thursday morning," he added.