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Solutions. The Unbelievable Story of the Japanese Man Who Survived BOTH Atomic Bombs. Tsutomu Yamaguchi may very well have been both the luckiest and most unlucky man ever.

The Unbelievable Story of the Japanese Man Who Survived BOTH Atomic Bombs

On August 6, 1945, he was riding a small trolley across the city of Hiroshima. Yamaguchi recalls hearing the roar of an aircraft engine in the skies above during the ride, but thought nothing of it, since warplanes were constantly flying overhead during that time. What Yamaguchi didn’t know was that this was no Japanese plane- it was the U.S. Bomber the Enola Gay, preparing to drop a 13 kiloton uranium atom bomb on the city. Yamaguchi stepped off the tram at approximately 8:15 a.m. The Enola Gay and some of its crew (Photo: Wikimedia Commons) Seconds later, the scene turned to chaos. “[There was] a great flash in the sky and I was blown over.” Yamaguchi was less than three kilometers away from the bomb when it detonated. Hiroshima before and after the bomb. He eventually regained consciousness, and was able to crawl his way to an air raid shelter, where he spent the night.

In poverty, groceries can be five times more expensive, as this video stunt shows. A hidden camera in a San Francisco grocery store last year captured patrons' reactions when their items ring up as five times more expensive, adjusted to reflect the cost of living near the poverty line.

In poverty, groceries can be five times more expensive, as this video stunt shows.

In "Poverty Line Prices," above, people are shocked when they see their totals. When you're poor, milk can have an adjusted cost of $24. The video comes from Tipping Point Community, an organization that combats poverty in the Bay Area, and advertising agency Goodby Silverstein & Partners. In San Francisco, the average annual family income is $153,000, five times the $24,300 a year that families living on the poverty line earn (or roughly 1 in 10 families in San Francisco). Don't Be Fooled: 'Generation Wealth' Is More About Wanting Than Having. Jackie and friends with Versace handbags at a private opening at the Versace store, Beverly Hills, California, 2007.

Don't Be Fooled: 'Generation Wealth' Is More About Wanting Than Having

Lauren Greenfield/INSTITUTE hide caption toggle caption Lauren Greenfield/INSTITUTE Jackie and friends with Versace handbags at a private opening at the Versace store, Beverly Hills, California, 2007. Plastic surgery, private jets, toddlers in designer clothes, magnums of champagne — Lauren Greenfield's 500-page photo collection, Generation Wealth, shows all of that. A Timeline – Russia and President Trump.

Gallery: An intriguing sci-fi vision of a megacity. Olalekan Jeyifous may have trained as an architect, but these days, the Nigerian-born, Brooklyn-based artist is much more interested in sparking debate with his conceptual drawings and sculptures.

Gallery: An intriguing sci-fi vision of a megacity

Starting conversation is at the center of his Improvised Shanty-Megastructures series, a speculative, forward-facing vision of Lagos, Nigeria, one of the world’s largest cities (with an estimated population of some 21 million). His images, which he creates through a process similar to architectural renderings, juxtapose sprawling shanty-town megastructures with shiny luxury developments.

He aims to highlight how urban development tends to focus on the wealthy and often displace poorer communities altogether. Of the series, he says, “I hope it gets people thinking about these communities, less as this aggregate, poor slum and more about the individuals who live there.” He also wants viewers to learn from informal settlements’ often-unheralded design and sustainability practices. A 'Forgotten History' Of How The U.S. Government Segregated America. Federal housing policies created after the Depression ensured that African-Americans and other people of color were left out of the new suburban communities — and pushed instead into urban housing projects, such as Detroit's Brewster-Douglass towers.

A 'Forgotten History' Of How The U.S. Government Segregated America

Paul Sancya/AP hide caption toggle caption Paul Sancya/AP Federal housing policies created after the Depression ensured that African-Americans and other people of color were left out of the new suburban communities — and pushed instead into urban housing projects, such as Detroit's Brewster-Douglass towers. In 1933, faced with a housing shortage, the federal government began a program explicitly designed to increase — and segregate — America's housing stock. You're not going to believe what I'm about to tell you. Comics Blog Books Shop Comics: Random Most Popular All Cats Grammar Food Animals Tech This is a comic about the backfire effect.

You're not going to believe what I'm about to tell you

Inspiration This comic was inspired by this three-part series on the backfire effect from the You Are Not So Smart Podcast. Other fun reading Reddit - Change My View Wikipedia's list of common misconceptions Sources You Are Not So Smart Website Podcast USC Creativity and Brain institute Wooden teeth Slave teeth Napoleon Thomas Crapper Houseflies Exploding in a vacuum Jesus's birthday The Pledge of Allegiance Roe v. Shady Conservative Group Is Flooding the FCC With Anti-Net Neutrality Comments - Motherboard. That didn't take long.

Shady Conservative Group Is Flooding the FCC With Anti-Net Neutrality Comments - Motherboard

Barely 24 hours after the Federal Communications Commission opened up comments for its proposal to undo net neutrality regulations, a right wing advocacy group appears to have flooded the zone with comments suggesting the regulations have "diminished broadband investment, stifled innovation, and left American consumers potentially on the hook for a new broadband tax. " A section of the pre-baked comments. Image: Nicholas Deleon. Bitcoin Cases. WebManga.