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National Archives of Australia and Archives NZ

National Archives of Australia and Archives NZ

http://discoveringanzacs.naa.gov.au/

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Collections in Melbourne: A Guide to Commonwealth Government Records - Collections in Melbourne: A Guide to Commonwealth Records Celia Blake Published by the National Archives of Australia This is guide number 8 in the series of research guides published by the National Archives. The Melbourne office of the National Archives of Australia holds a wealth of material that will interest both professional and family historians. Papua New Guinea Patrol Reports Reports from government patrols are a major source of primary information on Papua New Guinea’s colonial-era history. Patrol officers and other officials wrote detailed documents reporting on all aspects of the work carried out by the patrols. The reports give first-hand accounts on many topics, from first contact with remote Highland villages, to census counts, tax collection, health care, justice, labor recruiting, plantations, missionaries, anthropological descriptions, tribal warfare, languages, and more. The reports in this collection date primarily from the post-World War II era of Papua New Guinea, up through 1975, when PNG gained independence from Australia; a few pre-War reports are also included. The documents in this collection were digitized from microforms held at the University of California, with the permission of the National Archives of Papua New Guinea.

First World War 1914–18 Australian troops in the Lone Pine trenches. A02022 A02022 Australian troops in the Lone Pine trenches. AWM A02022 Australia’s involvement in the First World War began when Britain and Germany went to war on 4 August 1914, and both Prime Minister Joseph Cook and Opposition Leader Andrew Fisher, who were in the midst of an election campaign, pledged full support for Britain. The outbreak of war was greeted in Australia, as in many other places, with great enthusiasm. The first significant Australian action of the war was the Australian Naval and Military Expeditionary Force’s (ANMEF) landing on Rabaul on 11 September 1914. Anzac Story Canada offered 30,000 men, Australia pledged 20,000 and New Zealand already had compulsory military training. For the war In Europe, Australia raised a new army of volunteers - the Australian Imperial Force (the AIF). Recruiting began within days of the declaration of war. Those who were too young raised their ages - and most were accepted.(See 'Boy Soldiers') In little over a month, marches were held in the main capital cities hoping to encourage others to join them.

Anzac Connections Bringing historic documents from the Australian War Memorial’s archive to all Australians Anzac Connections is a major web development project that not only progressively delivers new digitised collections to the website but also aims to improve search and discovery on the site, providing new ways for people to interact with our collections. The project was originally established to mark the 2015 centenary of the Gallipoli campaign but has since expanded to include collections relating to the Western Front and Sinai/Palestine. The private record collections of hundreds of individuals who served in the First World War are now online and hold a wealth of stories: a young soldier on the Somme, freezing and up to his knees in mud, using a brief lull in the fighting to pen a letter to his parents at home; a nurse in one of the many field hospitals, exhausted and desperately trying to treat the mass of incoming wounded.

1 Historical background Recognising Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples in the Constitution: Report of the Expert Panel Millions of non-indigenous Australians have joined with us in the search for a better relationship based on equity and justice. Australians at every level of our society have put up their hands to be counted as supporters of a nation that holds as its core value a society based on mutual respect, tolerance and justice. ... I am convinced that true reconciliation that is not based upon truth will leave us as a diminished nation. And I ... am convinced that such reconciliation is possible.

Early world maps Antiquity Babylonian Imago Mundi (c. 600 BCE) A Babylonian world map, known as the Imago Mundi, is commonly dated to the 6th century BCE.[1][2] The map as reconstructed by Eckhard Unger shows Babylon on the Euphrates, surrounded by a circular landmass showing Assyria, Urartu (Armenia)[3] and several cities, in turn surrounded by a "bitter river" (Oceanus), with seven islands arranged around it so as to form a seven-pointed star. The accompanying text mentions seven outer regions beyond the encircling ocean. The descriptions of five of them have survived:[4]

Digitised WWI Victorian newspapers A major project commemorating World War I has digitised 216 WWI-era Victorian community newspapers and made them available online via the National Library of Australia’s Trove portal. Victorians everywhere can now explore the stories of their communities and family and friends who lived and fought through the Great War. This digitised collection contains thousands of stories waiting to be found. These newspapers of the day provide, in their original format, news and public debate; letters from soldiers, sailors and nurses; death notices, images and more.

Remembering fallen war heroes is insincere if it excludes those suffering today As a first-generation Muslim Australian, I’ve often wondered what Anzac Day should mean to me. The furore (and social media savagery) over Yasmin Abdel-Magied’s seven words have reignited that uncertainty. And now I’m despairing about the vitriol being thrown at Muslims and immigrants. Since primary school, I have commemorated and reflected on the meaning of war and Australia’s sacrifices.

The five funniest moments in Australian history History, let's be blunt, is hilarious. It's hilarious for the same reason life itself is hilarious: it's filled with weirdos and idiots screwing everything up in the worst ways possible. But the beauty of history as a comedic resource is that it all happened ages ago, so you don't have to pretend to feel sorry for the people it happened to. Public Domain Collections: Free to Share & Reuse That means everyone has the freedom to enjoy and reuse these materials in almost limitless ways. The Library now makes it possible to download such items in the highest resolution available directly from the Digital Collections website. Search Digital Collections No permission required. No restrictions on use.

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