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The Myth of Sisyphus

The Myth of Sisyphus
The Myth of Sisyphus is a philosophical essay by Albert Camus. It comprises about 119 pages and was published originally in 1942 in French as Le Mythe de Sisyphe; the English translation by Justin O'Brien followed in 1955. In the essay, Camus introduces his philosophy of the absurd: man's futile search for meaning, unity, and clarity in the face of an unintelligible world devoid of God and eternal truths or values. Summary[edit] The essay is dedicated to Pascal Pia and is organized in four chapters and one appendix. Chapter 1: An Absurd Reasoning[edit] Camus undertakes to answer what he considers to be the only question of philosophy that matters: Does the realization of the meaninglessness and absurdity of life necessarily require suicide? He then characterizes a number of philosophies that describe and attempt to deal with this feeling of the absurd, by Heidegger, Jaspers, Shestov, Kierkegaard, and Husserl. Chapter 2: The Absurd Man[edit] How should the absurd man live? Appendix[edit] Related:  Profound JunkWikipedia A

List of unsolved problems in philosophy This is a list of some of the major unsolved problems in philosophy. Clearly, unsolved philosophical problems exist in the lay sense (e.g. "What is the meaning of life?", "Where did we come from?", "What is reality?", etc.). Aesthetics[edit] Essentialism[edit] In art, essentialism is the idea that each medium has its own particular strengths and weaknesses, contingent on its mode of communication. Art objects[edit] This problem originally arose from the practice rather than theory of art. While it is easy to dismiss these assertions, further investigation[who?] Epistemology[edit] Epistemological problems are concerned with the nature, scope and limitations of knowledge. Gettier problem[edit] In 1963, however, Edmund Gettier published an article in the periodical Analysis entitled "Is Justified True Belief Knowledge?" In response to Gettier's article, numerous philosophers have offered modified criteria for "knowledge." Infinite regression[edit] Molyneux problem[edit] Münchhausen trilemma[edit]

Lord Byron He travelled all over Europe especially in Italy where he lived for seven years and then joined the Greek War of Independence fighting the Ottoman Empire, for which Greeks revere him as a national hero.[1] He died one year later at age 36 from a fever contracted while in Missolonghi in Greece. Often described as the most flamboyant and notorious of the major Romantics, Byron was celebrated in life for aristocratic excesses, including huge debts, numerous love affairs with both sexes, rumours of a scandalous incestuous liaison with his half-sister, and self-imposed exile.[2] Early life[edit] Byron's paternal grandparents were Vice-Admiral the Hon. John "Foulweather Jack" Byron, and Sophia Trevanion.[7] Vice Admiral John Byron had circumnavigated the globe, and was the younger brother of the 5th Baron Byron, known as "the Wicked Lord". Catherine Gordon, Byron's mother Upon the death of Byron's mother-in-law Judith Noel, the Hon. Education and early loves[edit] Ah! Career[edit] Later years[edit]

The Plague The Plague (French: La Peste) is a novel by Albert Camus, published in 1947, that tells the story of a plague sweeping the French Algerian city of Oran. It asks a number of questions relating to the nature of destiny and the human condition. The characters in the book, ranging from doctors to vacationers to fugitives, all help to show the effects the plague has on a populace. The novel is believed to be based on the cholera epidemic that killed a large percentage of Oran's population in 1849 following French colonization, but the novel is placed in the 1940s.[1] Oran and its environs were struck by disease multiple times before Camus published this novel. The Plague is considered an existentialist classic despite Camus' objection to the label.[2][3] The narrative tone is similar to Kafka's, especially in The Trial whose individual sentences potentially have multiple meanings, the material often pointedly resonating as stark allegory of phenomenal consciousness and the human condition.

Fourth dimension Fourth dimension may refer to: Science[edit] Four-dimensional space, the concept of a fourth dimensionSpacetime, the unification of time and space as a four-dimensional continuumMinkowski space, the mathematical setting for special relativity Literature[edit] Music[edit] Computing[edit] Film[edit] Other[edit] See also[edit] Clio All of the Muses were considered to be the best practitioners of their fields, and any mortal challenging them in their sphere was destined to be defeated. They were often associated with Apollo. The most common number of the Muses is 9, but the number is not always consistent in earlier mythologies.[3] Hesiod is usually considered to have set their number, names, and spheres of interest in his poem Theogony.[6] Clio, sometimes referred to as "the Proclaimer", is often represented with an open scroll of parchment scroll or a set of tablets. 'Clio' represents history in some coined words: cliometrics, cliodynamics. See also[edit] Muses in popular culture for references to Clio References[edit] External links[edit]

The Stranger From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Jump to navigationJump to search The Stranger or Stranger may refer to: Literature[edit] Fictional characters and stage personae[edit] Phantom Stranger, a character in the DC Comics UniverseThe Handsome Stranger, early stage name for American professional wrestler Buff Bagwell (born 1970) Film[edit] Music[edit] Albums[edit] Songs[edit] Television[edit] Video games[edit] Other uses[edit] Stranger, Texas, an unincorporated community in Falls County, TexasKwaDukuza or Stranger, a town in KwaZulu-Natal, South AfricaPortrait of an Unknown Woman or Stranger, an 1883 painting by Ivan Kramskoi See also[edit] s Esoteric, Spiritual and Metaphysical Database Bilderberg Group The Bilderberg Group, Bilderberg conference, Bilderberg meetings or Bilderberg Club is an annual private conference of approximately 120–150 political leaders and experts from industry, finance, academia and the media.[1][2] About two thirds of the participants come from Europe and the rest from North America; one third from politics and government and the rest from other fields.[1][3] §Origin[edit] The original conference was held at the Hotel de Bilderberg in Oosterbeek, Netherlands, from 29 to 31 May 1954. Retinger approached Prince Bernhard of the Netherlands who agreed to promote the idea, together with former Belgian Prime Minister Paul Van Zeeland, and the head of Unilever at that time, Dutchman Paul Rijkens. The success of the meeting led the organizers to arrange an annual conference. §Organizational structure[edit] Dutch economist Ernst van der Beugel became permanent secretary in 1960, upon Retinger's death. According to James A. §Chairmen of the Steering Committee[edit]

Nobel Prize in Literature One of the five Nobel Prizes established in 1895 by Alfred Nobel The Nobel Prize in Literature (Swedish: Nobelpriset i litteratur) is a Swedish literature prize that is awarded annually, since 1901, to an author from any country who has, in the words of the will of Swedish industrialist Alfred Nobel, produced "in the field of literature the most outstanding work in an ideal direction" (original Swedish: "den som inom litteraturen har producerat det mest framstående verket i en idealisk riktning").[2][3] Though individual works are sometimes cited as being particularly noteworthy, the award is based on an author's body of work as a whole. The Swedish Academy decides who, if anyone, will receive the prize. The academy announces the name of the laureate in early October. It is one of the five Nobel Prizes established by the will of Alfred Nobel in 1895. Nobel's "vague" wording for the criteria for the prize has led to recurrent controversy. Background[edit] Prizes[edit] Laureates[edit]

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