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Planetary science

Planetary science
Planetary science (rarely planetology) is the scientific study of planets (including Earth), moons, and planetary systems, in particular those of the Solar System and the processes that form them. It studies objects ranging in size from micrometeoroids to gas giants, aiming to determine their composition, dynamics, formation, interrelations and history. It is a strongly interdisciplinary field, originally growing from astronomy and earth science,[1] but which now incorporates many disciplines, including planetary astronomy, planetary geology (together with geochemistry and geophysics), atmospheric science, oceanography, hydrology, theoretical planetary science, glaciology, and exoplanetology.[1] Allied disciplines include space physics, when concerned with the effects of the Sun on the bodies of the Solar System, and astrobiology. There are interrelated observational and theoretical branches of planetary science. History[edit] Disciplines[edit] Planetary astronomy[edit] Geomorphology[edit]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Planetary_science

Related:  wikipedia.org and pagesExo-planets

Astrophysics Astrophysics (from Greek astron, ἄστρον "star", and physis, φύσις "nature") is the branch of astronomy that deals with the physics of the universe, especially with "the nature of the heavenly bodies, rather than their positions or motions in space."[1][2] Among the objects studied are galaxies, stars, planets, extrasolar planets, the interstellar medium and the cosmic microwave background.[3][4] Their emissions are examined across all parts of the electromagnetic spectrum, and the properties examined include luminosity, density, temperature, and chemical composition. Because astrophysics is a very broad subject, astrophysicists typically apply many disciplines of physics, including mechanics, electromagnetism, statistical mechanics, thermodynamics, quantum mechanics, relativity, nuclear and particle physics, and atomic and molecular physics. In practice, modern astronomical research often involves a substantial amount of work in the realm(s) of theoretical and/or observational physics.

Rich exoplanet system discovered 24 August 2010Last updated at 14:03 By Victoria Gill Science reporter, BBC News The researchers say the finding marks a new phase in the hunt for exoplanets Astronomers have discovered a planetary system containing at least five planets that orbit a star called HD 10180, which is much like our own Sun. The star is 127 light years away, in the southern constellation of Hydrus.

GJ 422 b GJ 422 b is an extrasolar planet orbiting Innes' star. It was discovered in 2014. It has mass about 10 Earth masses, thus it may be a super-Earth or a sub-Neptune. It is probably located within the circumstellar habitable zone (HZ) of the Innes' star: its HZ extends from 0.11 to 0.21 a. u., and the planet's semi-major axis is 0.119+0.014 −0.011 a. u. Archaeoastronomy Archaeoastronomy (also spelled archeoastronomy) is the study of how people in the past "have understood the phenomena in the sky, how they used these phenomena and what role the sky played in their cultures."[1] Clive Ruggles argues it is misleading to consider archaeoastronomy to be the study of ancient astronomy, as modern astronomy is a scientific discipline, while archaeoastronomy considers symbolically rich cultural interpretations of phenomena in the sky by other cultures.[2][3] It is often twinned with ethnoastronomy, the anthropological study of skywatching in contemporary societies. Archaeoastronomy is also closely associated with historical astronomy, the use of historical records of heavenly events to answer astronomical problems and the history of astronomy, which uses written records to evaluate past astronomical practice. Archaeoastronomy can be applied to all cultures and all time periods. History of archaeoastronomy[edit]

Extrasolar planet 2 January 2013: Astronomers state that the Milky Way may contain as many as 400 billion exoplanets, with almost every star hosting at least one planet.[1][2][3] An exoplanet or extrasolar planet is a planet outside the Solar System. Around 1800 such planets have been discovered[5][6][7] (1783 planets in 1105 planetary systems including 460 multiple planetary systems as of 18 April 2014).[8] The nearest known exoplanet, if confirmed, would be Alpha Centauri Bb, but there is some doubt about its existence. Almost all of the planets detected so far are within the Milky Way; however, there have been a small number of possible detections of extragalactic planets.

HAT-P-9b References[edit] External links[edit] Media related to HAT-P-9b at Wikimedia Commons Coordinates: Cosmochemistry Meteorites are often studied as part of cosmochemistry. Cosmochemistry or chemical cosmology is the study of the chemical composition of matter in the universe and the processes that led to those compositions.[1] This is done primarily through the study of the chemical composition of meteorites and other physical samples. Given that the asteroid parent bodies of meteorites were some of the first solid material to condense from the early solar nebula, cosmochemists are generally, but not exclusively, concerned with the objects contained within the solar system.

Astronomers may have just discovered the first known free-floating planet There isn't any reason this object wouldn't or couldn't have satellites of its own; and probably does. Earth has 1-6 moons at any given time, but we don't really notice them because they're small and interloping. Here, experiment: Sadly there is no way to intelligently answer those questions at this time beyond "Well, we do not know of any reason either of those things should be impossible, but we do not know anything about what would make that possible either." We simply have no empirical evidence to work with here except for what we can observe in our own solar system, and we have absolutely no way to know whether what we observe here could be considered "typical" or whether our system represents some extreme abberration... or even whether the interactions which govern stellar/planetary formation allow for the word "typical" to have any meaning whatsoever.

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