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Modern Library 100 Best Novels

Modern Library 100 Best Novels
Modern Library's 100 Best Novels is a list of the best English-language novels [1] of the 20th century as selected by the Modern Library, an American publishing company owned by Random House. Criticism of the Modern Library list includes that it did not include enough novels by women (and that only one woman was on the panel) and not enough novels from outside North America and Europe. [2] In addition, some contend it was a "sales gimmick," since most of the titles in the list are also sold by Modern Library.[3] Others[who?] note that both Modern Library and Random House USA, the parent company, are US companies. Critics have argued that this is responsible for a very American view of the greatest novels. A Reader's List 100 Best Novels was published separately by Modern Library in 1999. A separate Modern Library 100 Best Nonfiction list of the 100 best non-fiction books of the 20th century was created the same year. Lists[edit] Editors' list (20th Century Great Novels)[edit] Notes[edit] Related:  Wikipedia Alists

100 Best Novels « Modern Library ULYSSES by James Joyce Written as an homage to Homer’s epic poem The Odyssey, Ulysses follows its hero, Leopold Bloom, through the streets of Dublin. Overflowing with puns, references to classical literature, and stream-of-consciousness writing, this is a complex, multilayered novel about one day in the life of an ordinary man. Initially banned in the United States but overturned by a legal challenge by Random House’s Bennett Cerf, Ulysses was called “a memorable catastrophe” (Virginia Woolf), “a book to which we are all indebted” (T. Click here to read more about ULYSSES THE GREAT GATSBY by F. Set in the Jazz Age, The Great Gatsby tells the story of the mysterious millionaire Jay Gatsby, his decadent parties, and his love for the alluring Daisy Buchanan. A PORTRAIT OF THE ARTIST AS A YOUNG MAN by James Joyce Published in 1916, James Joyce’s semiautobiographical tale of his alter ego, Stephen Dedalus, is a coming-of-age story like no other. LOLITA by Vladimir Nabokov 1984 by George Orwell

Brave New World Classic 1932 science fiction novel by Aldous Huxley In 1999, the Modern Library ranked Brave New World as #5 on its list of the 100 best English-language novels of the 20th century.[2] In 2003, Robert McCrum, writing for The Observer, included Brave New World chronologically at #53 in "the top 100 greatest novels of all time",[3] and the novel was listed at #87 on The Big Read survey by the BBC.[4] Title[edit] O wonder! Translations of the title often allude to similar expressions used in domestic works of literature: the French edition of the work is entitled Le Meilleur des mondes (The Best of All Worlds), an allusion to an expression used by the philosopher Gottfried Leibniz[7] and satirised in Candide, Ou l'Optimisme by Voltaire (1759). History[edit] Huxley said that Brave New World was inspired by the utopian novels of H. Plot[edit] Characters[edit] Bernard Marx, a sleep-learning specialist at the Central London Hatchery and Conditioning Centre. Benito Hoover, Another of Lenina's lovers.

List of books banned by governments A display of formerly banned books at a US library Banned books are books or other printed works such as essays or plays which are prohibited by law or to which free access is not permitted by other means. The practice of banning books is a form of censorship, from political, legal, religious, moral, or (less often) commercial motives. This article lists notable banned books and works, giving a brief context for the reason that each book was prohibited. The Saudi Arabian government has reportedly passed a law that imposes the death penalty on people caught smuggling Bibles into the majority-Muslim country. Many other countries throughout the world have their own methods of restricting access to books, although the prohibitions vary strikingly from one country to another: hate speech, for example, is prohibited in a number of countries, such as Sweden, though the same books may be legal in the United States or United Kingdom, where the only prohibition is on child pornography.

Le Monde's 100 Books of the Century The 100 Books of the Century (French: Les cent livres du siècle) is a list of the one hundred best books of the 20th century, according to a poll conducted in the spring of 1999 by the French retailer Fnac and the Paris newspaper Le Monde. Starting from a preliminary list of 200 titles created by bookshops and journalists, 17,000 French voted by responding to the question, "Which books have stayed in your memory?" (« Quels livres sont restés dans votre mémoire ? »).[1] The list of acclaimed titles mixes great novels with poetry and theatre, as well as the comic strip. The first fifty works on the list were the subject of an essay by Frédéric Beigbeder, The Last Inventory Before Liquidation, in which he notably drew attention to its French-centred character. The 100 Books of the Century[edit] Note: Language refers to the book's first language, not to the author's career generally. See also[edit] References[edit] External links[edit]

Heart of Darkness The story is a complex exploration of the beliefs people hold on what constitutes a barbarian versus a civilized society and the stance on colonialism and racism that was part and parcel of European imperialism. Originally published as a three-part serial story, in Blackwood's Magazine, the novella Heart of Darkness has been variously published and translated into many languages. In 1998, the Modern Library ranked Heart of Darkness as the sixty-seventh of the hundred best novels in English of the twentieth century.[1] Composition and publication[edit] Joseph Conrad based Heart of Darkness on his own experiences in the Congo. Joseph Conrad acknowledged that Heart of Darkness was in part based on his own experiences during his travels in Africa. There have been many proposed sources for the character of the antagonist, Kurtz. On May 31, 1902, in a letter to William Blackwood, Conrad remarked; Plot summary[edit] Old Belgian river station on the Congo River, 1889 Reception[edit]

P.J. O’Rourke Picks His Favorite Travel Books A Utah mother charged with killing 6 of her infant children was described as cold and aloof by a neighbor. Police are still searching for answers in the tragedy. The woman who sits in a suicide suit in a Utah County Jail cell traded one prison for another. Megan Huntsman, charged with murder for the deaths of seven children that she claims to have birthed, then killed, had lived with her secretive deeds beginning in 1996, according to her statements to police. While some neighbors have praised her in the terms many use when confronted with a horrible crime committed by a seemingly gentle person, others thought Huntsman was, quite simply, “cold.” “I tried to be friends with her for a long time,” SanDee Wall told The Daily Beast. “She was always aloof, quiet, and never put out any effort to reciprocate,” Wall said. He was there to clean out the garage, towing a small trailer behind a white closed cab pick-up truck. Within 15 minutes police arrived. How did no one know?

Western canon Origins[edit] The process of listmaking—defining the boundaries of the canon—is endless. The philosopher John Searle has said: "In my experience there never was, in fact, a fixed 'canon'; there was rather a certain set of tentative judgments about what had importance and quality. Such judgments are always subject to revision, and in fact they were constantly being revised."[2] One of the notable attempts at compiling an authoritative canon in the English-speaking world was the Great Books of the Western World program. An earlier attempt, the Harvard Classics (1909), was promulgated by Harvard University president Charles W. ... Debate[edit] Defenders maintain that those who undermine the canon do so out of primarily political interests, and that such criticisms are misguided and/or disingenuous. One of the main objections to a canon of literature is the question of authority—who should have the power to determine what works are worth reading and teaching? Works[edit] Examples[edit]

A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man Background[edit] Born to a middle-class family in Dublin, Ireland, James Joyce (1882–1941) excelled as a student, graduating from University College Dublin in 1902. He moved to Paris to study medicine, but soon gave it up. He returned to Ireland at his family's request as his mother was dying of cancer; despite her pleas, the impious Joyce and his brother Stanislaus refused to make confession or take communion, and when she passed into a coma refused to kneel and pray for her. Joyce made his first attempt at a novel, Stephen Hero, in early 1904. Composition[edit] Et ignotas animum dimittit in artes. Joyce showed, in his own words, "a scrupulous meanness" in his use of materials for the book. Publication history[edit] There was difficulty finding an English publisher for the finished novel, so Pound arranged for its publication by American publishing house B. Major characters[edit] Stephen Dedalus - The main character of A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man. Synopsis[edit] ... Style[edit]

The Greatest Books of All Time, As Voted by 125 Famous Authors “Reading is the nourishment that lets you do interesting work,” Jennifer Egan once said. This intersection of reading and writing is both a necessary bi-directional life skill for us mere mortals and a secret of iconic writers’ success, as bespoken by their personal libraries. The Top Ten: Writers Pick Their Favorite Books asks 125 of modernity’s greatest British and American writers — including Norman Mailer, Ann Patchett, Jonathan Franzen, Claire Messud, and Joyce Carol Oates — “to provide a list, ranked, in order, of what [they] consider the ten greatest works of fiction of all time– novels, story collections, plays, or poems.” Of the 544 separate titles selected, each is assigned a reverse-order point value based on the number position at which it appears on any list — so, a book that tops a list at number one receives 10 points, and a book that graces the bottom, at number ten, receives 1 point. In introducing the lists, David Orr offers a litmus test for greatness:

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