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List of cryptids

List of cryptids
The following is a list of cryptids, animals and plants studied under the field of cryptozoology. Their presumptive existence has often been derived from anecdotal or other evidence considered insufficient by mainstream science. The status of cryptids on this list falls into six categories: Unconfirmed – cryptids whose existence is alleged but not demonstrated.Disputed – cryptids that have a body of evidence against their existence.Proposed [animal name] – cryptids with an alternative explanation accepted by the general scientific community.Extinct – animals that are generally believed to be extinct, but which cryptozoologists believe may have an extant relict population.Confirmed [animal name or cause] – animals once classified as cryptids but whose existence has now been confirmed.Hoax – cryptids once thought to be real but later conclusively proven to be hoaxes. Cryptids[edit] See also[edit] Notes[edit] References[edit] Jump up ^ Posted by Velociman at June 8, 2004 9:27 PM (2004-06-08). Related:  Wikipedia.org

Buffalo buffalo Buffalo buffalo buffalo buffalo Buffalo buffalo - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia - StumbleUpon The sentence's meaning becomes clearer when it's understood that it uses three meanings of the word buffalo: the city of Buffalo, New York, the somewhat uncommon verb "to buffalo" (meaning "to bully or intimidate"), as well as the animal buffalo. When the punctuation and grammar are expanded, the sentence could read as follows: "Buffalo buffalo that Buffalo buffalo buffalo, buffalo Buffalo buffalo." The meaning becomes even clearer when synonyms are used: "Buffalo bison that other Buffalo bison bully, themselves bully Buffalo bison." Sentence construction Bison engaged in a contest of dominance. A comic explaining the concept The sentence is unpunctuated and uses three different readings of the word "buffalo". Marking each "buffalo" with its use as shown above gives: Buffaloa buffalon Buffaloa buffalon buffalov buffalov Buffaloa buffalon. "New York bison New York bison bully, bully New York bison", or:"New York bison whom other New York bison bully, themselves bully New York bison". Usage

Loch Ness Monster The Loch Ness Monster is a cryptid, a creature whose existence has been suggested but is not discovered or documented by the scientific community.[3] It is reputedly a large unknown animal that inhabits Loch Ness in the Scottish Highlands. It is similar to other supposed lake monsters in Scotland and elsewhere, though its description varies from one account to the next. Popular interest and belief in the animal's existence has varied since it was first brought to the world's attention in 1933. Evidence of its existence is anecdotal, with minimal and much-disputed photographic material and sonar readings. Origins Loch Ness History Saint Columba (6th century) The earliest report of a monster associated with the vicinity of Loch Ness appears in the Life of St. Spicers (1933) In August 1933 a motorcyclist named Arthur Grant claimed to have nearly hit the creature while approaching Abriachan on the north-eastern shore, at about 1 a.m. on a moonlit night. Chief Constable William Fraser (1938) C.

Lojong Lojong (Tib. བློ་སྦྱོང་,Wylie: blo sbyong) is a mind training practice in the Tibetan Buddhist tradition based on a set of aphorisms formulated in Tibet in the 12th century by Geshe Chekhawa. The practice involves refining and purifying one's motivations and attitudes. The fifty-nine or so slogans that form the root text of the mind training practice are designed as a set of antidotes to undesired mental habits that cause suffering. Prominent teachers who have popularized this practice in the West include Pema Chodron,[1] Ken McLeod, Alan Wallace, Chogyam Trungpa, Sogyal Rinpoche, Geshe Kelsang Gyatso, and the 14th Dalai Lama.[2] History of the practice[edit] Atiśa journeyed to Sumatra and studied with Dharmarakṣita for twelve years. A story is told that Atiśa heard that the inhabitants of Tibet were very pleasant and easy to get along with. The aphorisms on mind training in their present form were composed by Chekawa Yeshe Dorje (1101–1175 CE). The Root Text[edit] Slogan 1. 1. 2. 3. 4.

Family tree of the Greek gods Key: The essential Olympians' names are given in bold font. See also List of Greek mythological figures Notes External links Media related to Family trees of Greek mythology at Wikimedia Commons Mothman Mothman is the name of a cryptid speculated to exist after several reports of unidentified creatures seen in the Point Pleasant area of West Virginia from November 15, 1966, to December 15, 1967. The first newspaper report was published in the Point Pleasant Register dated November 16, 1966, titled "Couples See Man-Sized Bird ... Creature ... Something".[1] The being subsequently entered regional folklore. Mothman was introduced to a wider audience by Gray Barker in 1970,[2][3] and later popularized by John Keel in his 1975 book The Mothman Prophecies, claiming that there were supernatural events related to the sightings, and a connection to the collapse of the Silver Bridge. History[edit] On November 12, 1966, five men who were digging a grave at a cemetery near Clendenin, West Virginia, claimed to see a man-like figure fly low from the trees over their heads.[5] This is often identified as the first known sighting of what became known as the Mothman. Analysis[edit] Popular culture[edit]

Bigfoot Field Researchers Organization List of emerging technologies Agriculture[edit] Biomedical[edit] Displays[edit] Electronics[edit] Energy[edit] IT and communications[edit] Manufacturing[edit] Materials science[edit] Military[edit] Neuroscience[edit] Robotics[edit] Transport[edit] Other[edit] See also[edit] General Disruptive innovation, Industrial Ecology, List of inventors, List of inventions, Sustainable development, Technology readiness level Nano- Molecular manufacturing, Neurotechnology Bioscience Human Connectome Project Ethics Casuistry, Computer ethics, Engineering ethics, Nanoethics, Bioethics, Neuroethics, Roboethics Other Anthropogenics, Machine guidance, Radio frequency identification, National Science Foundation, Virtual reality Transport List of proposed future transport Further reading[edit] IEEE International Conference on Emerging Technologies and Factory Automation, & Fuertes, J. References[edit] External links[edit]

Chupacabra The chupacabra (Spanish pronunciation: [tʃupaˈkaβɾa], from chupar "to suck" and cabra "goat", literally "goat sucker") is a legendary cryptid rumored to inhabit parts of the Americas, with the first sightings reported in Puerto Rico. The name comes from the animal's reported habit of attacking and drinking the blood of livestock, especially goats. Physical descriptions of the creature vary. It is purportedly a heavy creature, the size of a small bear, with a row of spines reaching from the neck to the base of the tail. Eyewitness sightings have been claimed as early as 1995 in Puerto Rico, and have since been reported as far north as Maine, and as far south as Chile, and even being spotted outside the Americas in countries like Russia and The Philippines, but many of the reports have been disregarded as uncorroborated or lacking evidence. History Possible origin Radford divided the chupacabra reports into two categories: Reported sightings Appearance

Cryptozoology Online: Centre for Fortean Zoology (CFZ) - the world's best cryptozoology organisation - main page Sea Peoples The Sea Peoples, or Peoples of the Sea, are thought to have been a confederacy of seafaring raiders who could have possibly originated from either western Anatolia or southern Europe, specifically a region of the Aegean Sea,[1] who sailed around the eastern Mediterranean and invaded Anatolia, Syria, Canaan, Cyprus, and Egypt toward the end of the Bronze Age.[2] However, the actual identity of the Sea Peoples has remained enigmatic and modern scholars have only the scattered records of ancient civilizations and archaeological analysis to inform them. Historical context[edit] The Linear B Tablets of Pylos in the Late Bronze Age in the Aegean demonstrate increased slave raiding and the spread of mercenaries and migratory peoples and their subsequent resettlement. Despite this, the actual identity of the Sea Peoples has remained enigmatic and modern scholars have only the scattered records of ancient civilizations and archaeological analysis to inform them. Documentary records[edit]

Spring Heeled Jack There are many theories about the nature and identity of Spring-heeled Jack. This urban legend was very popular in its time, due to the tales of his bizarre appearance and ability to make extraordinary leaps, to the point that he became the topic of several works of fiction. Spring-heeled Jack was described by people who claimed to have seen him as having a terrifying and frightful appearance, with diabolical physiognomy, clawed hands, and eyes that "resembled red balls of fire". One report claimed that, beneath a black cloak, he wore a helmet and a tight-fitting white garment like an oilskin. Many stories also mention a "Devil-like" aspect. History Precedents In the early 19th century, there were reports of ghosts that stalked the streets of London. The most important of these early entities was the Hammersmith Ghost, which in 1803 and 1804 was reported in Hammersmith on the western fringes of London; it would later reappear in 1824. Early reports Official recognition Alsop case Scales case

Pennsylvania Bigfoot Society, 6th millennium BC During the 6th millennium BC, agriculture spread from the Balkans to Italy and Eastern Europe, and also from Mesopotamia to Egypt. World population was essentially stable at numbers ranging between approximately 5 and 7 million. Events[edit] Black Sea today (light blue) and in 5600 BC (dark blue) according to Ryan's and Pitman's theories, versions of the Black Sea deluge theory Byzantine Calendar illustrating 1 September 5509 BC (the calendar is from the 12th century CE). Yangshao Culture Environmental changes[edit] c. 7000 BC: Beginning the Holocene climatic optimum.c. 6000 BC: The land bridge connecting England with the rest of Europe disappears beneath the waters of the North Sea and the English Channel.c. 5600 BC: According to the Black Sea deluge theory, the Black Sea floods with salt water. Inventions, discoveries, introductions[edit] Cultural landmarks[edit] References[edit]

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