background preloader


The north portal of the 11th century Urnes stave church has been interpreted as containing depictions of snakes and dragons that represent Ragnarök In Norse mythology, Ragnarök is a series of future events, including a great battle foretold to ultimately result in the death of a number of major figures (including the gods Odin, Thor, Týr, Freyr, Heimdallr, and Loki), the occurrence of various natural disasters, and the subsequent submersion of the world in water. Afterward, the world will resurface anew and fertile, the surviving and returning gods will meet, and the world will be repopulated by two human survivors. Ragnarök is an important event in the Norse canon, and has been the subject of scholarly discourse and theory. The event is attested primarily in the Poetic Edda, compiled in the 13th century from earlier traditional sources, and the Prose Edda, written in the 13th century by Snorri Sturluson. Mythology[edit] The Old Norse word "ragnarok" is a compound of two words.

Related:  Germanic Mythology (Norse, Germanic, and Continental Germanic)Wikipedia A

Anglo-Saxon paganism Anglo-Saxon paganism refers to the religious beliefs and practices followed by the Anglo-Saxons between the fifth and eighth centuries AD, during the initial period of Early Medieval England. A variant of the Germanic paganism found across much of north-western Europe, it encompassed a heterogeneous variety of disparate beliefs and cultic practices.[1] Developing from the earlier Iron Age religion of continental northern Europe, it was introduced to Britain following the Anglo-Saxon migration in the mid fifth century, and remained the dominant religion in England until the Christianization of its kingdoms between the seventh and eighth centuries, with some aspects gradually blending into folklore.[citation needed]

Andy McNab DCM MM (born 28 December 1959), usually known by his pseudonym Andy McNab,[1] is an English novelist and former SAS sergeant. McNab came into public prominence in 1993, when he published his account of the Special Air Service (SAS) patrol Bravo Two Zero, for which he had been awarded the Distinguished Conduct Medal in 1991.[2] He had previously received the Military Medal in 1980, awarded for an action whilst serving with the Royal Green Jackets in Northern Ireland during 1979.[3] Early life[edit] McNab was born on 28 December 1959. Found abandoned on the steps of Guy's Hospital in Southwark in a Harrods shopping bag, he was brought up in Peckham, with his adoptive family.

Valkyries, Wish-Maidens, and Swan-Maids Dear Viking Answer Lady: I am a high school coach for girls' sports. The school mascot is "the Vikings" and features a grim visaged male warrior. List of mythologies This is a list of mythologies of the world, by culture and region. Mythologies by region[edit] Africa[edit]

HOW DOES OUR LANGUAGE SHAPE THE WAY WE THINK? By Lera Boroditsky Humans communicate with one another using a dazzling array of languages, each differing from the next in innumerable ways. Do the languages we speak shape the way we see the world, the way we think, and the way we live our lives? Do people who speak different languages think differently simply because they speak different languages? Does learning new languages change the way you think? Do polyglots think differently when speaking different languages? Nine Herbs Charm The Nine Herbs Charm is an Old English charm recorded in the 10th-century[1] Lacnunga manuscript.[2] The charm is intended for the treatment of poisoning and infection by a preparation of nine herbs. The numbers nine and three, significant in Germanic paganism and later Germanic folklore, are mentioned frequently within the charm.[2] The poem contains references to Christian and English Pagan elements, including a mention of the major Germanic god Woden. According to R. K.

Irshad Manji Irshad Manji; (born 1968) is a Canadian author, professor and advocate of a "reform and progressive" interpretation of Islam. Manji is the founder and director of the Moral Courage Project at the Robert F. Wagner Graduate School of Public Service at New York University, which aims to teach young leaders "to make values-driven decisions for the sake of their integrity -- professional and personal. the Myths It is a universal truth that the myths of all cultures are the attempts of people to explain the world in which they live. So too, are the myths of ancient Egypt. Within the great epic myths are explained many smaller mysteries of life along the Nile. While enjoying the major epics, be sure to notice the explanations of the Egyptian universe within them. Enjoy!

Germanic mythology Thor or Donar, god of thunder, one of the major figures in Germanic mythology. Germanic mythology is a comprehensive term for myths associated with historical Germanic paganism, including Norse mythology, Anglo-Saxon mythology, Continental Germanic mythology, and other versions of the mythologies of the Germanic peoples. Germanic mythology ultimately derives from Indo-European mythology, also known as Indo-Germanic mythology. Time Perception Time Perception [Publishers are always concerned about the number of pages in a book, so to pare down an earlier edition of the text, this section was removed. It's now a bit dated, but I'll make an effort to update it when the smoke clears a bit.] Perhaps you have an uneasy feeling as you begin to read about time perception.

Related:  NorseMythology