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Art Nouveau

Art Nouveau
Art Nouveau is considered a "total" art style, embracing architecture, graphic art, interior design, and most of the decorative arts including jewellery, furniture, textiles, household silver and other utensils and lighting, as well as the fine arts. According to the philosophy of the style, art should be a way of life. For many well-off Europeans, it was possible to live in an art nouveau-inspired house with art nouveau furniture, silverware, fabrics, ceramics including tableware, jewellery, cigarette cases, etc. Artists desired to combine the fine arts and applied arts, even for utilitarian objects.[3] Origins[edit] Art Nouveau interior at the 1900 Paris Universal Exhibition by Bruno Möhring, German pavilion. Naming[edit] Jugendstil sculpture, detail of facade in Metz, France Art Nouveau is usually known as Jugendstil (pronounced [ˈjuːɡən̩tʃtiːl ]) in Germany, as Modern (Модерн) in Russia, as Modernisme in Catalonia (Spain), as Secession in Austria-Hungary and as Stile Liberty in Italy. Related:  Wikipedia Amore about art

Nichiren Buddhism Nichiren Buddhism (Japanese: 法華系仏教 Hokke-kei Bukkyo) is a branch of Buddhism based on the teachings of the 13th century Japanese monk Nichiren (1222–1282). Nichiren Buddhism is generally noted for its focus on the Lotus Sutra and an attendant belief that all people have an innate Buddha nature and are therefore inherently capable of attaining enlightenment in their current form and present lifetime. It is also noted its opposition to other forms of Buddhism, which Nichiren saw as deviating from the Buddhist truth he had discovered. Nichiren Buddhism is a comprehensive term covering several major schools and many sub-schools, as well as several of Japan's new religions. The founder, Nichiren[edit] Some Nichiren schools see the incident of the attempted beheading as marking a turning point in Nichiren's teaching, since Nichiren began inscribing the Gohonzon and wrote a number of major doctrinal treatises during his subsequent three-year exile on Sado Island in the Japan Sea.

Joliprint | Print friendly & PDF your blogs and websites Edwardian architecture Edwardian architecture is the style popular during King Edward VII of the United Kingdom's reign; he reigned from 1901 to 1910, but the architecture style is generally considered to be indicative of the years 1901 to 1914.[1] Edwardian architecture is generally less ornate than high or late Victorian architecture,[2] apart from a subset used for major buildings known as Edwardian Baroque architecture. Characteristics[edit] Colour: lighter colours were used; the use of gas and later electric lights caused designers to be less concerned about the need to disguise soot buildup on walls compared to Victorian era architecture.[2]Patterns: "Decorative patterns were less complex; both wallpaper and curtain designs were more plain."[2]Clutter: "There was less clutter than in the Victorian era. Architectural influences[edit] See also[edit] References[edit] Further reading[edit] External links[edit]

Nichiren Nichiren (日蓮) (February 16, 1222 – October 13, 1282) was a Buddhist monk who lived during the Kamakura period (1185–1333) in Japan. Nichiren taught devotion to the Lotus Sutra (entitled Myōhō-Renge-Kyō in Japanese)— which contained Gautama Buddha's teachings towards the end of his life — as the exclusive means to attain enlightenment. Nichiren believed that this sutra contained the essence of all of Gautama Buddha's teachings relating to the laws of cause and effect and karma. This devotion to the sutra entails the chanting of Nam(u)-Myōhō-Renge-Kyō (referred to as "daimoku") as the essential practice of the teaching.[1] Life[edit] Birth[edit] Education[edit] Initial teaching[edit] On April 28, 1253, he expounded Nam-Myōhō-Renge-Kyō for the first time, marking his Sho Tempōrin (初転法輪: "first turning the wheel of the Law"). Among other things, in 1253 Nichiren predicted the Mongol invasions of Japan: a prediction which was validated in 1274. Treatise (first remonstrance)[edit] Gohonzon[edit]

Irish Art | Encyclopedia of Visual Arts in Ireland | History of art Victor Horta Victor, Baron Horta (6 January 1861 - 8 September 1947) was a Belgian architect and designer. John Julius Norwich described him as "undoubtedly the key European Art Nouveau architect." Indeed, Horta is one of the most important names in Art Nouveau architecture; the construction of his Hôtel Tassel in Brussels in 1892-3 means that he is sometimes credited as the first to introduce the style to architecture from the decorative arts. The French architect Hector Guimard was deeply influenced by Horta and further spread the "whiplash" style in France and abroad. Life and career[edit] Born in Ghent, Horta was first attracted to the architectural profession when he helped his uncle on a building site at the age of twelve. When Horta's father died in 1880, he returned to Belgium and moved to Brussels, married his first wife, with whom he later fathered two daughters, and went to study architecture at the Académie Royale des Beaux-Arts. Art Nouveau[edit] Twentieth century[edit] Heritage[edit]

Naraka Naraka (Sanskrit: नरक) is the Sanskrit word for the underworld; literally, of man. According to some schools of Hinduism, Sikhism, Jainism and Buddhism, Naraka is a place of torment, or Hell. The word 'Neraka' (modification of Naraka) in Indonesia and Malaysian has also been used to describe the Islamic concept of Hell. Hinduism[edit] A large central panel portrays Yama the god of death (often referred to as Dharma) seated on a throne; to the left stands a demon. To the right of Yama sits Chitragupta, assigned with keeping detailed records of every human being and upon their death deciding how they are to be reincarnated, depending on their previous actions. Naraka in Vedas, is a place where souls are sent for the expiation of their sins. In Puranas like Bhagavata Purana, Garuda Purana and Vishnu Purana there are elaborate descriptions of many hells. Yama Loka is the abode of Lord Yama. Buddhism[edit] Jainism[edit] See also[edit] Notes[edit] External links[edit]

Antony Gormley Early life[edit] The youngest of seven children born to a German mother and an Irish father,[1] Gormley grew up in a wealthy Roman Catholic[2] family living in Dewsbury Moor, West Yorkshire.[1] He attended Ampleforth College, a Benedictine boarding school in Yorkshire,[1] before reading archaeology, anthropology and the history of art at Trinity College, Cambridge, from 1968 to 1971.[1] He travelled to India and Sri Lanka to learn more about Buddhism between 1971 and 1974.[1] After attending Saint Martin's School of Art and Goldsmiths in London from 1974, he completed his studies with a postgraduate course in sculpture at the Slade School of Fine Art, University College, London, between 1977 and 1979. Career[edit] Gormley's career began with a solo exhibition at the Whitechapel Art Gallery in 1981. Almost all his work takes the human body as its subject, with his own body used in many works as the basis for metal casts. Recognition[edit] Art market[edit] Major works[edit] References[edit]

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