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The Minimalists

The Minimalists
Our newest book, Everything That Remains, is now available in (nearly) every possible format: Thanks to your support, the book reached #2 in its category on Amazon, as well as #9 of the top 100 books on Amazon last month. If you love the book, we’d really appreciate a review on Amazon. Those reviews help us spread our simple-living message. If you’re not sure whether you want to read Everything That Remains, you can check out a few excerpts here: Also, you can get a signed copy of the book during our 100-city tour, which is currently in progress.

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Related:  Minimalism, Less Stuff, SimplifyDeclutteringThought provokingTo read laterAir du temps

5 Strategies for Decluttering a Small Space It is a lot harder to keep an apartment or small house organized and tidy — but it is critical that you do so. It only takes one pile of papers and one box to overwhelm a smaller space. What to do? We asked organizing and de-cluttering guru Nicole Anzia of Neatnik in Washington DC what her top five strategies are for harnessing chaos in smaller homes and apartments. Here's what she said… The Top Five Strategies for Decluttering a Small Space:

Why tidying up could change your life I am stuffing a letter between two books when I realise my possessions are in charge of me. It’s a hoarder’s attempt at tidying: hiding stuff inside other stuff. My coffee table groans under books, digital devices, coffee cups, lint rollers, newspapers and one or both of my kittens, Ollie and Sebastian. Bottles of toiletries line the bathroom mirror collecting dust, and upstairs cubbyholes burst with clothes I no longer wear. Let’s not even talk about my inbox, crammed with unread emails. The Stuff is winning.

Internet History: Video of 1981 TV report shows birth of Internet News It’s easy to forget how far the Internet has come considering how plugged in we all are today thanks to laptops, smartphones and other connected devices, but we found a fantastic video that will no doubt serve as an eye-opening and hilarious reminder. “Imagine, if you will, sitting down to your morning coffee, turning on your home computer to see the day’s newspaper,” begins this report from KRON in San Francisco. “Well, it’s not as far-fetched as it may seem.” The report, filed by KRON’s Steve Newman back in 1981, details the birth of Internet news as it chronicles an experiment being conducted by the San Francisco Examiner where editors programmed a copy of each day’s paper into a computer and made it available via the Internet. To connect to the Web and access the S.F. Examiner’s paper, by the way, a reader had to place the receiver of his or her telephone on a dock and then manually dial into a service provider’s network.

How to write 10,000 words a day One of the most popular posts on the Thesis Whisperer is How to write 1000 words a day and not go bat shit crazy. Last year a Twitter follower brought to my attention a post called How I went from writing 2000 words to 10,000 words a day by the fiction writer Rachel Aaron. I did a double take. Can you really write 10,000 words a day? Well, Rachel says she can, with three conditions:

Salary vs. Performance What baseball teams are spending their money well, and how does it change over the course of the season? This piece started from a curiosity over how mismatches in spending don’t always translate to on-field advantages or disadvantages. This sketch looks at all 30 Major League Baseball Teams and ranks them on the left according to their day-to-day standings. Incredible Clutter Transformations In the beginning of January, Leo Babauta and I challenged you to dump 50% of your stuff. More than 2000 people signed up for the Clutterfat Challenge and made a commitment to clear the clutter. Here are 2 remarkable stories of real people donating, selling and trading in their clutter for a better life. Stevie Allen I recently participated in The Clutterfat Challenge, where I agreed to go through all of my “stuff” over a 30 day period and attempt to get rid of what wasn’t needed or wanted anymore. The goal was to dump 50% of my stuff.

7 Ways to Declutter Like a Goddess with the KonMari Method I want to share with you a book that has absolutely changed my life. It’s called The Life Changing Magic of Tidying: A Simple, Effective Way To Banish Clutter Forever by Marie Kondo, the creator of the KonMari Method. As the title says, this is a very simple (though not easy) way to get to the root of your clutter problem and help you to resolve it once and for all: If you don’t love it, don’t keep it!

The secrets of the world's happiest cities Two bodyguards trotted behind Enrique Peñalosa, their pistols jostling in holsters. There was nothing remarkable about that, given his profession – and his locale. Peñalosa was a politician on yet another campaign, and this was Bogotá, a city with a reputation for kidnapping and assassination. What was unusual was this: Peñalosa didn't climb into the armoured SUV. Instead, he hopped on a mountain bike.

The Urban Imaginary Published in the exhibition catalogue The City that Never Was. Barcelona: Centre de Cultura Contemporània de Barcelona, 2003 Does the city lend itself to reverie or to the dream? New theory upends view of how brain is wired COLUMBIA U. (US) — The long-held view of how signals move through the cerebral cortex of the human brain may be incorrect. For decades, scientists thought they had a pretty clear understanding of how signals move through the cerebral cortex.

» Finding yourself in spareness We often create an identity for ourselves using things. We have logos or slogans or cute catchphrases on our clothing, and it shows people who we are. We have tattoos or piercings, baseball caps, accessories, smartphones, designer bags, Manolo Blahnik shoes … and these express to others who we are. In our homes, what we have on our walls shows others who we are. Life at Home in the Twenty-First Century Dishes in the sink, toys throughout the house, stuff covering every flat surface; this clutter not only makes our homes look bad, it makes us feel bad, too. At least that’s what researchers at UCLA’s Center on Everyday Lives and Families (CELF) discovered when they explored in real time the relationship between 32 California families and the thousands of objects in their homes. The resulting book, Life at Home in The Twenty-First Century, is a rare look at how middle-class Americans use the space in their homes and interact with the things they accumulate over a lifetime. Our over-worked closets are overflowing with things we rarely touch. Related: Your Home’s Unsung Hero — The Closet

How to Stop Procrastinating by Using the “Seinfeld Strategy” Jerry Seinfeld is one of the most successful comedians of all‐time. He is regarded as one of the “Top 100 Comedians of All–Time” by Comedy Central. He was also the co–creator and co–writer of Seinfeld, the long–running sitcom which has received numerous awards and was claimed to have the “Top TV Episode of All–Time” as rated by TV Guide. According to Forbes magazine, Seinfeld reached his peak in earnings when he made $267 million dollars in 1998. (Yes, that was in one year. No, that’s not a typo.)

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