background preloader

General Biology - Free Biology Video Lectures

General Biology - Free Biology Video Lectures

Japan Wants To Turn The Moon Into A Giant Power Plant Shimizu Corporation, a Japanese architecture and engineering firm, has a plan to effectively turn the moon into a giant solar power plant, reports Inhabitat. It proposes building a massive collection of solar panels (a "Luna Ring") 6,800 miles long by 12 miles wide on the moon’s surface. That’s certainly a heavy-duty construction job for human beings, so Shimizu plans to get the work done with robots, only involving humans in supervisory roles. Once complete, this hypothetical plant could continuously send energy to "receiving stations" around the globe by way of lasers and microwave transmission. This idea gets around two major hurdles for solar power, as there is no weather or darkness to curb electricity production on the moon. Read the full article at: businessinsider.com

Table of contents (With last update date) Cover Foreword (August 13, 2009) Part 1. Quantum theory and consciousness Preface to part 1 (April 12, 2000) Chapter 1. 1.1. 1.6. 1.7. Chapter 2. 2.1. 2.2. 2.3. 2.4. 2.5. 2.6. Chapter 3. 3.1. 3.2. 3.3. 3.4. Chapter 4. 4.1. 4.2. 4.3. 4.4. Chapter 5. 5.1. 5.2. 5.3. 5.4. 5.5. 5.6. 5.7. 5.8. 5.9. 5.10. 5.11. 5.12. 5.13. 5.14. 5.15. 5.16. Chapter 6. 6.1. 6.2. 6.3. 6.4. 6.5. 6.6. 6.7. 6.8. 6.9. 6.10. 6.12. Part 2. Preface to part 2 (October 17, 2010) Chapter 7. 7.1. 7.2. 7.3. 7.4. 7.5. 7.6. 7.7. 7.9. 7.10. Chapter 8. 8.1. 8.2. Chapter 9. 9.1. 9.2. 9.3. 9.4. 9.6. Chapter 10. 10.1. 10.2. 10.3. 10.4. Chapter 11. 11.1. 11.2. 11.3. 11.4. 11.5. 11.6. 11.7.The victim/victimizer polar pair 11.8. 11.9. 11.10. Chapter 12. 12.1. 12.2. 12.3. 12.5. 12.6. 12.7. Chapter 13. 13.1. 13.2. 13.3. 13.4. 13.5. 13.6. 13.7. 13.8. 13.9. 13.10. 13.11. 13.12. 13.13. Chapter 14. 14.1. 14.2. 14.3. 14.4. 14.5. 14.6. 14.7. 14.8. Chapter 15. Chapter 16. 16.3. 16.4. 16.5. Part 3. Chapter 17. 17.1. 17.2.

www.irishlichens Literature's Ten Most Disturbing Sociopaths How many times have you imagined smashing someone's windshield with a tire iron after they cut you off in traffic? Or stabbing your boss with a sharp pencil when he denies you that raise yet again? Or conning your way into a carefree life of luxury? We all have dark urges—at least I hope it's not just me or this is going to be one seriously awkward article—but very few of us act on them, which might be why we love reading about people who do. Many sociopaths are charming, witty, and intelligent. Before we take a look at ten unforgettable, morally devoid characters from literature, let's get straight on what makes a sociopath. 10. Skills: Bilingual (French and English), lovely singing voice, talented pianist and actress, witty and charming—you'd be tempted to cast her in a Broadway rendition of Les Mis. Dirty deeds: Becky is what the hip-hop crowd would refer to as a natural-born hustler. Quote: Lady Jane describes Becky as "a wicked woman—a heartless mother, a false wife ... 9. 8. 7.

Three New Planets and a Mystery Object Discovered Outside Our Solar System Click on image for high-resolution file. Three planets -- each orbiting its own giant, dying star -- have been discovered by an international research team led by Alex Wolszczan, an Evan Pugh Professor of Astronomy and Astrophysics at Penn State, using the Hobby-Eberly Telescope. Penn State is a major partner in the design, construciton, and operation of this telescope, which is one of the largest in the world. In 1992, Wolszczan became the first astronomer ever to discover planets outside our solar system. 26 October 2011 — Three planets -- each orbiting its own giant, dying star -- have been discovered by an international research team led by a Penn State University astronomer. The three newly-discovered planetary systems are more evolved than our own solar system. Once Wolszczan and his team had confirmed that HD 240237, BD +48 738, and HD 96127 did indeed have planets orbiting around them, they measured the metal content of the stars and found some interesting correlations.

animals.nationalgeographic African elephants are the largest land animals on Earth. They are slightly larger than their Asian cousins and can be identified by their larger ears that look somewhat like the continent of Africa. (Asian elephants have smaller, rounded ears.) Elephant ears radiate heat to help keep these large animals cool, but sometimes the African heat is too much. Elephants are fond of water and enjoy showering by sucking water into their trunks and spraying it all over themselves. Afterwards, they often spray their skin with a protective coating of dust. An elephant's trunk is actually a long nose used for smelling, breathing, trumpeting, drinking, and also for grabbing things—especially a potential meal. Both male and female African elephants have tusks they use to dig for food and water and strip bark from trees. Because ivory is so valuable to some humans, many elephants have been killed for their tusks. Elephants eat roots, grasses, fruit, and bark, and they eat a lot of these things.

Human Portraits Hidden in the Topography of Maps Ink on original Michelin map of France Growing up, I've always thought the continent of Africa looked like a sideway face, but Ed Fairburn takes that imagination to a whole new level. The Cardiff-based illustrator finds portraits of human faces hidden amongst the topographical features in various maps of the world. View more over at Ed's official website | Facebook page | Interview with Yatzer - via Juxtapose Lake Windermere in England Stafford lane, in collaboration with Bobbie-Jo Pencil on an original map of the Peak District, England North America Geological map of Pennsylvania Ink on reproduced military maps of the Western Front (World War II) Pencil on celestial star chart

The brain’s silent majority - 2009 FALL When you have no clue, call it glue. “Glia,” the Greek word for glue, was the name the pathologist Rudolph Virchow gave, back in 1856, to the gelatinous substance that forms the bulk of the brain. And it stuck. These days, scientists use it to denote the matter that accounts for 90 percent of the brain’s cells and more than half its volume — but, like the late comic Rodney Dangerfield, “can’t get no respect.” Neurons, the “talented tenth” of the human brain that hog the lion’s share of brain scientists’ attention, are indeed a work of evolutionary art. “When the brain is injured, the neighborhood astrocytes go into a completely altered state.” We now know they’re doing much more. Certainly, it’s no stretch to imagine that knowing what glial cells do, and how they do it, could help explain brain disorders and how to cure them. From time to time, Ben Barres brings a brain in to his office. The guardian angels of the synapses Arne Hurty But Barres had a hunch they did more.

Related: