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6 Terrifying Ways Crows Are Way Smarter Than You Think

6 Terrifying Ways Crows Are Way Smarter Than You Think
Mankind has a long and checkered past with crows and ravens: They have been feared as symbols of death, because they're all black and scary, revered as creators of the world because, well, it was either them or the seagulls, and worshiped as trickster gods, because of their baffling intelligence. Intelligent enough, in fact, for us to start worrying ... #6. They Can Remember Your Face Next time you see a group of crows, look closely. Try to remember which one is which, and see if you can tell the difference between them the next time you pass. OK, so the scientists weren't just playing out horror movie fantasies -- they were testing whether the crows could recognize human faces or not. "Wow. Pretty soon, every single crow on the campus knew which masks meant trouble, and wanted the guys wearing them dead. Oh, and also none of the scientists were ever seen again. #5. I say, is that a west London accent I detect in that screaming gibberish? #4. One. They'll be back any minute now

http://www.cracked.com/article_19042_6-terrifying-ways-crows-are-way-smarter-than-you-think.html

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Lazy spider monkey hitches rides on parrots What’s a monkey to do when he can’t face the 8m (26ft) climb to the top of a tree? Simple – just hitch a ride on a parrot friend. This squirrel monkey is enjoying the benefits of befriending the blue and gold macaw by hopping on its back for rides. The bone idle animal lives with a male and female parrot at a countryside hotel, and the trio have become inseparable. ‘Its favourite activity is to climb on the back of the parrot and ride it around,’ said photographer Alejandro Jaramillo, 23, who spotted the unlikely pals in San Agustin, Colombia.

Donnie (dog) Donnie is a Doberman Pinscher dog who came to the attention of science due to his penchant for arranging his plush toys in geometric forms.[1] His owner rescued him from an animal shelter, and at first he was slow to learn, and very reluctant to interact socially with her.[2] He has appeared on the National Geographic Channel’s Dog Genius show.[1][3] On the show, he is shown arranging some of his 80 plush toys into evenly-spaced triangles and lines, and chooses to use, for example, only stuffed frogs or monkeys for a particular design.[4] He is shown creating his arrangements in his large yard in Maryland on remote video cameras without humans being present. He is even said to create social vignettes with the toys.[4][5] For example, the day after he first allowed his owner to put her arm around him, he placed a large bear with its arm around a smaller frog.[2][6] Dr.

Brain Scans Reveal What Dogs Really Think of Us In the 30,000 years humans and dogs have lived together, man's best friend has only become a more popular and beloved pet. Today, dogs are a fixture in almost 50% of American households. From the way dogs thump their tails, invade our laps and steal our pillows, it certainly seems like they love us back. Cute &Epic Animal Photos Published on Monday, June 20, 2011 by administrator EmailShare 0EmailShare Is there anything better than collection of cute and epic photos of many different animals to cheer you up ? We hope you will likes this and if you do we will make more effort in future Steampunk Insects Created from Bullets Tom Hardwidge’s Arthrobots are robotic insects — steampunk creations made from upcycled gears, nuts, bolts… and bullets! All images courtesy of Tom Hardwidge . English artist Tom Hardwidge has an unusual specialty: creating steampunk insects from old, inactive ammunition and pieces of clockwork. Each piece is so delicately and masterfully crafted that it is sometimes hard to even imagine what the recycled components might once have been, or to decipher where one part ends and where the next begins. Even harder to believe is that Hardwidge creates steampunk insects only as a hobby; he is a digital designer by day and gets time to work as a creative insect maker only at night. Apart from old bullets, discarded pocket watch parts make up the bulk of his little insects.

Dapper Inca Tern striking handlebar moustache By Phil Vinter Published: 09:46 GMT, 10 July 2012 | Updated: 16:45 GMT, 10 July 2012 This dapper chap is preened to perfection with its crisp white facial hair resembling a perfect handlebar moustache. 10 Most Intelligent Animals Erkan | On 20, May 2012 One of the most popular category in our blog is Most 10 Animals lists.So here is another interesting one. We humans don’t own the world alone. Why Adorable Puppies Can Make You Feel Violent Cute aggression is a particularly strange phenomenon. When we see something so cute, or even think about it – like a baby kitten, stumbling across the floor – we first experience a tsunami of positivity, an overwhelming accumulation of fuzzy happiness. Then, somewhat perplexingly, this feeling sometimes coexists with the urge to squeeze the kitten to death. This effect is recognized by scientists, and a study published earlier this year in the journal Psychological Science explains that this secondary, negative response may be trying to counteract the out-of-control positive one.

Bento Laptop Tablet Hybrid by René Woo-Ram Lee & Yanko Design - StumbleUpon Bento is quite an exceptional and forward thinking concept by René Woo-Ram Lee. It’s quite a plausible scenario that most of use/own a tablet, a PC, external hard drives and a smartphone. Now combine the power of these to have fully customizable Bento Laptop!

Show Me Your Money Face! Proving that money can buy happiness, these money/face mashups are stacking up quick around the web. The visual trick has been around for a while now, but not until this week when Reddit user MadSon11 posted his head matched with Alexander Hamiltons jaw (above) did the meme really get some legs. Redditors the world over have posted images using both U.S. bills and their own currency. Want to see MadSon11′s lower half? Orphaned baby owls Linford and Christie By Nick Enoch Published: 10:54 GMT, 20 March 2012 | Updated: 14:13 GMT, 20 March 2012 It's not the usual thing you'd expect to find in a kitchen - but these orphaned baby owls seemed right at home as they nestled in two cups. The feathered pair were clearly having a hoot after moving into the home of their wildlife park keeper, Jimmy Robinson. The six-week-old burrowing owlets, nicknamed Linford and Christie, were hatched in an incubator, and are now being hand-reared by Jimmy - who works at Longleat Safari Park in Wiltshire - and are given 24-hour care. Don't worry, owl do the washing-up: The two orphaned baby owls are having a hoot after moving into the home of their Longleat keeper Jimmy Robinson

Thinking the Way Animals Do By Temple Grandin, Ph.D. Department of Animal Science Colorado State University Western Horseman, Nov. 1997, pp.140-145

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