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Gurney Journey

Gurney Journey
This painting of the Grand Canal in Venice by Richard Parkes Bonington (1801-1828) looks immensely detailed and at first it looks like it would have taken a long time to paint. But he used a time-saving method that works really well for both plein-air and studio paintings of architecture. The trick is to paint the large areas of the building fronts in opaque paint with big bristle brushes. Then let that dry completely. This might take 24 hours or several days, depending on whether there's a drying agent in the paint, such as Liquin or a drop of cobalt drier. On the second day's session, you can go back over those big areas with a smaller brush to subdivide the building fronts.

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28 Gumroad Creators You Really Should Know — Illustrator's Lounge Since its launch in 2011 Gumroad has fast become one of the most popular platforms for creatives to sell their digital content. However, Gumroad is purposely designed without a centralised area of search and discovery, instead the emphasis is on the creators to direct their audience. Which makes it impossible to just stumble on all that great content. You can find some good stuff in the Gumroad Collections section, but that really does not even scratch the surface of how many gems the site has. Comments Advice for a New Illustrator Illustration is a very diverse and scattered profession, a practice that takes many forms, sometimes even hard to define, and it’s very unlikely that the careers of any two illustrators are alike. It’s mostly freelance work where an illustrator moves from one opportunity to the next, often in an unpredictable way week to week and certainly unpredictable throughout a working lifetime. If nothing else, markets, technology, culture, personal skills and interests will change and develop all the time.

Paperpokés - Pokémon Papercraft: BLASTOISE 009 / BLASTOISE - Pokémon PapercraftName: Blastoise Type: Water Species: Shellfish Pokémon Height: 1.6 m (5'03") Weight: 85.5 kg (188.5 lbs.) Interesting Facts: Blastoise is a large, bipedal, blue tortoise-like Pokémon with a tough brown shell and two powerful water cannons, which are like steel in appearance, that jut out of the top sides of its shell. The cannons can be withdrawn inside the shell, or rotated to point backwards; this enables Blastoise to commence jet assisted rams. THE PAPER MODEL Height: 15.9 cm/ 6.3 in Width: 22.2 cm/ 8.7 in Depth: 23.5 cm/ 9.3 in Pages: 7 Pieces: 55 Level: Medium Designer: Brandon Photo: LuIS NOTES: This one is moderately easy, just follow the numbers and included instructions. Download: A4 / Letter

Illustrator Sophie Blackall on Subversive Storytelling, Missed Connections, and Optimism by Maria Popova What Aldous Huxley’s misogyny has to do with children’s books, darkness, and modern love. Australian illustrator Sophie Blackall remains best-known for her warm, wistful, and whimsical Missed Connections: Love, Lost & Found (public library) — a visual paean to modern love by way of illustrated Craigslist missed connections, which you might recall as one of the best art and design books of 2011. If you live in New York, you’ve likely seen and admired her heart-warming subway artwork; and if you have a taste for obscure children’s books by famous adult authors, you might know and love her Aldous Huxley adaptation, one of more than thirty children’s books she has illustrated. In a recent episode of her fantastic Design Matters show, Debbie Millman talks to Blackall about the difference between an artist and an illustrator, what makes children’s storytelling particularly exciting, the origin and afterlife of the missed connections project, and more.

Art Tutorials, Foundational Knowledge, and Book/Video Recommendations Recommended books: All of Andrew Loomis's books - Andrew Loomis's artistic teachings are legendary, and his book are finally back in print after being out-of-print for decades. His books cover both easy stuff for beginners and advanced concepts, and they are arranged roughly like this: -Fun with a Pencil -Successful Drawing / Figure Drawing For All It's Worth / Drawing the Heads and Hands -Creative Illustration -The Painter's Eye Alla Prima: Everything I know About Painting, By Richard Schmid - This is one of the best books I own, and it's a real revelation for artists of any level. There is so much that book covers that you will not find anywhere else, and Schmid's wisdom on matters about creativity, technique, foundation knowledge, artistic purpose...etc are immensely valuable, and even life-changing. Google this book and buy it ASAP.

Justin Chan is on HIATUS and is creating nothing new for the time being! Hi! I'm a full-time student currently, studying animation at Sheridan College.In my spare time I do freelance, but I also love to drawthings for fun and post it on my blog!My blog is viewable for free, but this patreon is for those who want to show some extra appreciation! Make manga with a touch of realism in 5 easy steps Painting a realistic manga character isn't easy because the volumes aren't logical. For example, the eyes are totally flat. The best approach is to cheat and use more human-like shapes. Try to find good references such as vinyl figures or dolls, but bear in mind that it doesn't have to be exclusively plastic in nature.

Danny Santos II - Professional Photographer in Singapore When I’m out on the streets, I often encounter faces that make me look twice; faces that stand out in the crowd without trying; faces that are out of the ordinary. They range from the exquisitely beautiful to the strangely wonderful. I started to approach these strangers for permission to take a photo of them. Some said no, but most said yes. After taking their portrait, I’d say ‘thank you’ and walk on along. Polish School of Posters Beginning in the 1950s and through the 1980s, the Polish School of Posters combined the aesthetics of painting with the succinctness and simple metaphor of the poster. It developed characteristics such as painterly gesture, linear quality, and vibrant colors, as well as a sense of individual personality, humor, and fantasy. It was in this way that the Polish poster was able to make the distinction between designer and artist less apparent.[1]

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