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BBC Academy - Journalism

BBC Academy - Journalism
College of Journalism international The College has 11 international language websites to support the BBC World Service: Arabic, Burmese, Chinese (Simplified), Chinese (Traditional), Hausa, Pashto, Persian, Russian, Swahili, Urdu and Vietnamese, with more planned

http://www.bbc.co.uk/academy/journalism

Related:  Media, social media and New media`test 1026

BBC Academy - Production - Transmedia storytelling This week's episode of the CoP Show explains what transmedia storytelling is and why producers might want to use it. The simplest definition of transmedia storytelling is that it is a technique used to tell stories across multiple platforms: TV, radio, games, novels, social media, online or anywhere a story can unfold. "I think the core of it, is confidence in storytelling."– Chris Sizemore A transmedia storyteller may create many "entrypoints" across different platforms, so that, for example, a fan of a drama can read the online diaries of their favourite characters or follow their comments on Twitter.

Social Network Analysis: An Introduction by Orgnet,LLC Social network analysis [SNA] is the mapping and measuring of relationships and flows between people, groups, organizations, computers, URLs, and other connected information/knowledge entities. The nodes in the network are the people and groups while the links show relationships or flows between the nodes. SNA provides both a visual and a mathematical analysis of human relationships. Management consultants use this methodology with their business clients and call it Organizational Network Analysis [ONA]. ONA allows you to x-ray your organization and reveal the managerial nervous system that connects everything. To understand networks and their participants, we evaluate the location and grouping of actors in the network.

Social Media Toolkit This is a collection of tips, recommendations, tools and pieces of social media best practice. Compiled by The Open University's Social Media Team, it’s primarily aimed at colleagues who use social media in a professional capacity. This includes: People managing accounts as The Open UniversityPeople managing accounts as a nation, faculty, department, unit or any other part of the OUAcademic staff with personal accounts who post about their work It should also be useful to staff who are interested in starting social media accounts or learning new ways to use existing ones.

About - Digital Media Research Centre Our vision The Digital Media Research Centre (DMRC) conducts world-leading research that helps society understand and adapt to the social, cultural and economic transformations associated with digital media technologies. Aims and objectives Digital media have become a near-ubiquitous part of our everyday lives. They are associated with widespread cultural and social change ranging from personal interactions through to industry and political debate, provoking both opportunity and anxiety.

Media Commentary — Callie Schweitzer How We Internet: Finding the right news among too many options: The days of waiting for the newspaper thud outside the front door are over, and it’s no longer up to the editors of the New York Times to decide the lead story of the day. The process of getting news involves more choice than ever. We have access to unlimited options and sources to fill what seems like ever more limited time. Joho the BlogJoho the Blog - Let's just see what happens The hosts of the BardCast podcast consider Cymbeline to probably be Shakespeare’s worst play. Not enough happens in the first two acts, the plot is kuh-razy, it’s a mishmash of styles and cultures, and it over-explains itself time and time again. That podcast is far from alone in thinking that it’s the Bard’s worst, although, as BardCast says, even the Bard’s worst is better than just about anything. Nevertheless, when was the last time you saw a performance of Cymbeline? Yeah, me neither. We saw it yesterday afternoon, in its final performance at Shakespeare & Co in Lenox, Mass.

Listicles, aggregation, and content gone viral: How 1800s newspapers prefigured today’s Internet “If you think BuzzFeed invented the listicle, you haven’t spent enough time with 19th-century newspapers, because they’re everywhere.” That’s Ryan Cordell, a Northeastern University professor who researches virality in 19th-century newspapers, during a talk he gave recently at MIT. It was a common practice for 19th-century newspapers to republish poems, fiction excerpts, and even lists of facts that were originally published elsewhere. Editors would subscribe to many newspapers and would cut out things they thought were interesting, relevant, or fit a space on the page that they needed to fill and then republish them in their own papers, Cordell explained. “Many 19th-century newspapers are comprised primarily of content from other newspapers,” he said.

MediaLIT: My Media Use – Mediactive I’m asking folks taking our “MediaLIT: Overcoming Information Overload” MOOC course to describe their media use for a full day. In this post I’m combining several posts I did for my regular ASU course, as a demonstration of what I’m talking about. Note to MOOC folks: We don’t expect you to write something this long!

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