background preloader

SCOTUSblog

SCOTUSblog
On Monday at 9:30 a.m. we expect orders from the April 18 Conference. On both Tuesday and Wednesday we expect one or more decisions in argued cases; we will be live blogging both days beginning at 9:45 a.m. This is the first week of the April sitting. At 11 a.m. next Tuesday, the Supreme Court will hold one hour of oral argument on copyright issues surrounding a new technology for Internet streaming of free TV programs to customers for a monthly fee. Arguing for the over-the-air broadcasters in American Broadcasting Companies, Inc. v. Aereo, Inc., will be Paul D.

http://www.scotusblog.com/

Related:  Communication, news & Journalism

All Stories by Zeynep Tufekci The Media Needs to Stop Inspiring Copycat Murders. Here's How. After a wave of teen suicides in the 1980s, news outlets began reporting on these deaths more cautiously. Similar guidelines could help prevent more shooting sprees. Social Media's Small, Positive Role in Human Relationships It's just one factor in modern life that can increase connection in a world divided by the vagaries of capitalism, the disengagement of television, and the isolation of suburban sprawl. If We Built a Safer Nuclear Reactor, How Would We Know?

Naomi Wolf: Fascist America, in 10 easy steps Last autumn, there was a military coup in Thailand. The leaders of the coup took a number of steps, rather systematically, as if they had a shopping list. In a sense, they did. Legal Theory Blog Introduction Almost every law student get's some introduction to normative law and economics in their first year of law school. One of the basic ideas of normative law and economics is that the law should be "efficient." 4 high-tech ways the federal government is spying on private citizens Like it or not, the government is becoming increasingly watchful of everyone... even you One of the running jokes in the 1980s was how the former Soviet Union spied on its private citizens. As comedian Yakov Smirnoff used to joke: "In Soviet Russia, TV watches you!" But here in America, we were all safe from the prying eyes of the government. Fast forward to 2012, when the U.S. government actually has the tools and capabilities to spy on all its citizens.

Richard Gingras For more than thirty years, Richard Gingras has led highly-regarded efforts in the development of online services, software, and new media. These endeavors range from pioneering uses of satellite networking for television, the first applications of television signals for data distribution, both pre-Web and Web-based online services, and the creation of various platform technologies. Over the last several years Gingras has focused his attention on the transformation of the media landscape. Alien Tort Statute Text[edit] The district courts shall have original jurisdiction of any civil action by an alien for a tort only, committed in violation of the law of nations or a treaty of the United States.[1] History[edit] The ATS was part of the Judiciary Act of 1789.[2] There is little surviving legislative history regarding the Act, and its original meaning and purpose are uncertain.[3][4] However, scholars have surmised that the Act was intended to assure foreign governments that the U.S. would act to prevent and provide remedies for breaches of customary international law, especially breaches concerning diplomats and merchants.[5] The ATS may have been enacted in response to a number of international incidents caused by the non-availability of remedies for foreign citizens in the United States.[6] For example, the peace treaty ending the American Revolution provided for the satisfaction of debts to British creditors. From 1789 until 1980, only two courts based jurisdiction on the ATS.[7]

Innovation The intrinsic structure of companies has long been a subject of study, most famously by Ronald Coase, the eminent British economist and recipient of the 1991 Nobel Prize in economics. In 1937, Coase published a seminal paper, The Nature of the Firm, in which he explained that, in principle, a firm should be able to find the cheapest, most productive goods and services by contracting them out in an efficient, open marketplace. However, markets are not perfectly fluid. Transaction costs are incurred in obtaining goods and services outside the firm, such as searching for the right people, negotiating a contract, coordinating the work, managing intellectual property and so on. Firms thus came into being to make it easier to get work done. A well managed company tries to achieve a good balance between the work that gets done within and outside its boundaries.

GBU-28 The Guided Bomb Unit 28 (GBU-28) is a 5,000-pound (2,268 kg) laser-guided "bunker busting" bomb nicknamed "Deep Throat" produced originally by the Watervliet Arsenal, Watervliet, New York. It was designed, manufactured, and deployed in less than three weeks due to an urgent need during Operation Desert Storm to penetrate hardened Iraqi command centers located deep underground. Only two of the weapons were dropped in Desert Storm, both by F-111Fs.[1] The Enhanced GBU-28 augments the laser-guidance with Inertial navigation and GPS guidance systems.[2] Design and development[edit]

About - reported.ly First Look Media’s reported.ly is based all over the world, but we’re all easily reachable. Find out a little more about us below and how to get in contact with us. Our Twitter: Our team Twitter listOur FacebookOur subredditOur Storify collectionOur Medium collection Our team Malachy Browne Malachy is Managing Editor and Europe Anchor of Reported.ly. How Republicans are Being Taught to Talk About Occupy Wall Street To Our Faithful Current.com Users: Current's run has ended after eight exciting years on air and online. The Current TV staff has appreciated your interest, support, participation and unflagging loyalty over the years.

The Personal News Cycle: How Americans choose to get news Published This research was conducted by the Media Insight Project — an initiative of the American Press Institute and the Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research Introduction ALEC Exposed - Alec Exposed Progressive Policies Win at the Ballot Box Ballot measures across the country passed on November 8th highlighting the fact that progressive values still resonate with the U.S. electorate. Gains were made even in the face of industry deception and big dollar ad campaigns. In a victory for climate activists and solar energy, Floridians voted down Amendment 1, a constitutional amendment which would have made it hard for people with solar panels to sell energy back to the grid. Read the rest of this item here. Kochs Battle Dark Money Disclosure in South Dakota

Why did Hillary Clinton lose? Sign Up for Our free email newsletters Donald Trump's victory over Hillary Clinton will probably be considered the second-greatest upset in American presidential politics, after Harry Truman's come-from-behind victory in 1948. It raises one big question: Why did Clinton lose? Trump is a literally unprecedented candidate in American history: He is the first American president to be elected with no military or political experience of any kind. During his campaign, he made multiple gaffes and insulted about every ethnic group in the country aside from white people.

Related: