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How a Car Engine Works - Animagraffs

How a Car Engine Works - Animagraffs
Did you know that your car will take in 20,000 cubic feet of air to burn 20 gallons of fuel? That’s the equivalent of a 2,500 sq. ft. house! If your only experience with a car engine’s inner workings is “How much is that going to cost to fix?” this graphic is for you. Car engines are astoundingly awesome mechanical wonders. It’s time you learned more about the magic under the hood! Follow Animagraffs on Facebook, Twitter, or by email to get notified when I release new projects. This infographic has also been featured on:

http://animagraffs.com/how-a-car-engine-works/

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10 mind-boggling high-speed camera GIFs Some of the most interesting things you’ll ever see are happening far too fast for you to properly appreciate. Slowing down even the simplest occurrence can reveal incredible complexity. With modern high-speed photography we can get a glimpse of such things. How Americans Die By Matthew C. Klein / Bloomberg View / April 17, 2014How Americans Die The mortality rate fell by about 17 percent from 1968 through 2010, years for which we have detailed data.Almost all of this improvement can be attributed to improved survival prospects for men. It looks like progress stopped in the mid-1990s… Mortality rate per 100,000 people …but that’s only because the population has aged a lot since then. Share of population This has a big effect on the overall mortality rate, because old people die sooner than the young. Mortality rate per 100,000 people by age If you divide the population into separate age cohorts, you can see that improvements in life expectancy have been broad-based and ongoing.Looking at mortality for each age cohort since 1968, we see that Americans under 25 have made the most progress. Mortality rate per 100,000 people by age (1968 = 100) But one line in this chart looks unusual!

10 incredible microscopic GIFs Every day, life is going about its business, but we can only see a fraction of the organisms around us with the naked eye. Bacteria, protists, and tiny multicellular creatures live in a world that is completely alien to us and only visible through the microscope. Thanks to the wonder of science, we can dive into this world and see how these wee beasties get along.

a blog by victor powell May 29, 2013 In probability theory, the central limit theorem (CLT) states that, given certain conditions, the mean of a sufficiently large number of independent random variables, each with a well-defined mean and well-defined variance, will be approximately normally distributed. -- Central Limit Theorem - Wikipedia which is what we see here. at every triangle, the ball has a 50/50 shot of going to the left or to the right. you can also think of it like coin flips, where the number of coin flips is (bins -1) if we assign heads to 0, and tails, 1 (or 0 for left, 1 for right as in the case of the visualization above) for 1 coin flip, the possible sums of coin flips are: so for 1 coin flip, there are 2 different possible outcomes, each equally likely. the expected percentage of the possible outcomes is then:

Maps That Will Change the Way You See the World Where Google Street View is available. The supercontinent of Pangaea with modern day borders. The pink represents countries that the British have invaded. Goddammit, Brittan! Countries that don't use metric. Goddammit, America! Wind Map An invisible, ancient source of energy surrounds us—energy that powered the first explorations of the world, and that may be a key to the future. This map shows you the delicate tracery of wind flowing over the US. The wind map is a personal art project, not associated with any company. We've done our best to make this as accurate as possible, but can't make any guarantees about the correctness of the data or our software. Please do not use the map or its data to fly a plane, sail a boat, or fight wildfires :-)

Ethereal Macro Photos of Snowflakes in the Moments Before They Disappear Russian photographer Andrew Osokin is a master of winter macro photography. His photo collection is chock full of gorgeous super-close-up photographs of insects, flowers, snow, and frost. Among his most impressive shots are photographs of individual snowflakes that have fallen upon the ground and are in the process of melting away. The shots are so detailed and so perfectly framed that you might suspect them of being computer-generated fabrications. They’re not though. The images were all captured using a Nikon D80 or Nikon D90 DSLR and a 60mm or 90mm macro lens. Viral: Photo-Sharing Explosions This is a series of videos that visualizes a single piece of content being shared between hundreds of thousands of individuals on Facebook. We've tried to capture the frenetic energy surrounding three of the most shared images, all of which were photos published on George Takei's Page. Each visualization is made up of a series of branches starting from a single person. As the branch grows, re-shares split off on their own arcs, sometimes spawning a new generation of re-shares, sometimes exploding in a short-lived burst of activity. The two different colors show gender, and each successive generation becomes more and more white as time goes by.

Modern Pyramid House by Juan Carlos Ramos We've seen our fair share of unique modern home designs like the box-shaped metallic house or the abstract fortress made of concrete, but Mexican architect Juan Carlos Ramos has taken on a form less-visited for his aptly titled project Pyramid House—a conceptual pyramid-shaped home created and submitted as a proposal for a recent architecture competition. The simple geometric shape creates a clean aesthetic, while remaining extremely eye-catching due to its iconic though rarely applied form. Some highlights of this design are the multiple windows cut out of the four large triangular facades that allow natural light into the home. An enormous window covers one entire side of the structure that visually exposes and lightens the design. Viewers also get to see inside the modern multi-level interior which features a library, balcony, two bedrooms, and even a recording studio that have all been cleverly sectioned to fit inside this unconventional concept.

water we eat The good news is that each one of us can also make the world a little more water secure, ready to face the needs of our peak population future. How? The answer lies in our shopping baskets. The amount of meat in our diet is crucial! The average daily water consumption of a meat-eating person is 5000 litres of water per day. The average for a vegetarian is 2500 litres. Mystery of Prince Rupert's Drop at 130,000 fps About this video How was this done by so small a force? Smarter Every Day heads to a glassblowing workshop in Alabama to reveal the unique mechanical properties of the Prince Rupert's drop – a tadpole-shaped glass structure created by dropping molten glass in cold water.

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