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Ushistory.org

Ushistory.org
Free Online Textbooks High school courses for students, teachers, home-schoolers, and history lovers. Learn More. What's Hot National History Day Philadelphia Needs Your Help! Please help National History Day Philadelphia support students by providing projects supplies!

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Teacher Resources The Library of Congress offers classroom materials and professional development to help teachers effectively use primary sources from the Library's vast digital collections in their teaching. Find Library of Congress lesson plans and more that meet Common Core standards, state content standards, and the standards of national organizations. Discover and discuss ways to bring the power of Library of Congress primary sources into the classroom.

U.S: Geography, states, landmarks, maps, cities, population, laws, speeches U.S. States, Cities, History, Maps Year by Year: 1900–2015 Enter a year: Special Features The National Security Archive December 9, 2014 Torture Report Finally Released Senate Intelligence Committee Summary of CIA's Detention and Interrogation Program Concludes CIA Misled Itself, Congress, the President about Lack of Effectiveness. September 28, 2014 Monroe Doctrine (1823) The Monroe Doctrine was articulated in President James Monroe's seventh annual message to Congress on December 2, 1823. The European powers, according to Monroe, were obligated to respect the Western Hemisphere as the United States' sphere of interest. President James Monroe’s 1823 annual message to Congress contained the Monroe Doctrine, which warned European powers not to interfere in the affairs of the Western Hemisphere. Understandably, the United States has always taken a particular interest in its closest neighbors – the nations of the Western Hemisphere. Equally understandably, expressions of this concern have not always been favorably regarded by other American nations.

American Slave Narratives From 1936 to 1938, over 2,300 former slaves from across the American South were interviewed by writers and journalists under the aegis of the Works Progress Administration. These former slaves, most born in the last years of the slave regime or during the Civil War, provided first-hand accounts of their experiences on plantations, in cities, and on small farms. Their narratives remain a peerless resource for understanding the lives of America's four million slaves. What makes the WPA narratives so rich is that they capture the very voices of American slavery, revealing the texture of life as it was experienced and remembered. Each narrative taken alone offers a fragmentary, microcosmic representation of slave life. Read together, they offer a sweeping composite view of slavery in North America, allowing us to explore some of the most compelling themes of nineteenth-century slavery, including labor, resistance and flight, family life, relations with masters, and religious belief.

Resources High School Lessons (article PDF) From Social EducationThe Technology of Unequal Rights for Women: Patent Drawings of a Voting Machine Middle Level Lessons (whole-issue PDF) From Middle Level LearningRevolutionary Women: Portraits of Life in the 13 Colonies Elementary Lessons (article PDF) From Social Studies and the Young LearnerJane Addams: Raising Up the Poor Get access to ALL of the lessons and articles in Social Education, Middle Level Learning, and Social Studies and the Young Learner by becoming a member of NCSS. Then search the Publications Archive with Custom Google. American History in VOA Special English There are 246 fifteen-minute programs and 5 four-minute programs. That is about 62 hours of listening. About 'The Making of a Nation' Radio Program

West Point Altas Collection About Our Atlases In 1938 the predecessors of today's Department of History at the United States Military Academy began developing a series of campaign atlases to aid in teaching cadets a course entitled, "History of the Military Art." Since then, the Department has produced over six atlases and more than one thousand maps, encompassing not only America’s wars but global conflicts as well. In keeping abreast with today's technology, the Department of History is providing these maps on the internet as part of the department's outreach program. Citizen news: A democratic addition to political journalism Editor’s note: Herbert Gans is one of America’s preeminent sociologists, and some of his most notable work has come in examining the American news industry. His seminal 1979 book Deciding What’s News: A Study of CBS Evening News, NBC Nightly News, Newsweek and Time was born out of years spent in newsrooms, watching how the never-ending flood of human activity was distilled into the news. Here he argues for a new area of emphasis in political reporting for a democratic society — what he calls citizen news.

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