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100 Milestone Documents

100 Milestone Documents
The following is a list of 100 milestone documents, compiled by the National Archives and Records Administration, and drawn primarily from its nationwide holdings. The documents chronicle United States history from 1776 to 1965. Complete List of Documents Please note that you can always use the thumbnail images at the top of every page to navigate directly to any of the 100 Milestone Documents. home 100 milestone documents the people's vote tools for educators news & events national competitions about this site contact information related resources search Privacy & Use Accessibility Related:  USA's historieGovernment

Geography & Culture Finding Aid on the Cold War Compiled by Tim Wehrkamp Contents Preface Introduction Records in Presidential Libraries Comprehensive Subject Matter Records Newsreels and Television Broadcasts Record Group 306 (Records of the United States Information Agency) Still Pictures and Motion Pictures Textual Records Electronic Records Record Group 273 (Records of the National Security Council) Textual Records Records of the Military Textual Records Electronic Records Donated Material Still Pictures Motion Pictures Intelligence Records Textual Records Reconnaissance and Satellite Imagery Foreign Policy Records Textual Records Still Pictures Records of Congress Textual Records Appendix I: List of Record Groups (RG) Cited in Reference Information Paper 107 Appendix II: Sources of Additional Information About Records or Finding Aids Described in Reference Information Paper 107 End Notes Preface NARA's descriptive program comprises a variety of information products. John W. Introduction Records in Presidential Libraries

DocsTeach Help your students think through primary source documents for contextual understanding and to glean information to make informed judgments. The first few times you ask students to work with primary sources, and whenever you have not worked with primary sources recently, be sure to model careful document analysis. Direct students’ attention to the procedures involved and the kinds of questions you ask about the documents. After several instances of modeling, ask students to work as a class to analyze documents, vocalizing the process as they go. Eventually, students will internalize the procedure and be able to go through these steps on their own every time they encounter a primary source document. Remind students to practice this same careful document analysis for every primary source they see. Learn more about introducing your students to primary source documents. For any type of document — a written document, image, map, chart, graph, audio or video — move through the following steps:

The University of Oklahoma College of Law: A Chronology of US Historical Documents Links marked with an asterisk (*) are to other websites and will open in a new window. Pre-Colonial To 1600 The Magna Carta (1215) Letter from Christopher Columbus to the King & Queen of Spain (1490's) The *Iroquois Constitution 17th Century 18th Century The Albany Plan of 1754 The Resolutions of the Stamp Act (Oct. 19, 1765) 19th Century First Inaugural Address of President Thomas Jefferson (1801) Second Inaugural Address of President Thomas Jefferson (1805) The *Thomas Jefferson Papers at the Library of Congress *Thomas Jefferson Online Resources at the University of Virginia Information on *Monticello First Inaugural Address of President James Madison (1809) Second Inaugural Address of President James Madison (1813) The text of the Star Spangled Banner (Sept. 20, 1814) First Inaugural Address of President James Monroe (1817) Second Inaugural Address of President James Monroe (1821) The Monroe Doctrine (Dec. 2, 1823) Inaugural Address of President *Rutherford B.

Shared AP Government Comparative Shared Content Subject Courses American GovernmentPsychologyWorld Geography AP European History (Revised 2015) AP Government Comparative AP Human Geography AP US History AP World History (Revised 2015) Sociology (Revised 2015) US History World History (Revised 2015) OER Terms of Use OER Content Terms of Use Click Here AP Government & Politics Comparative Civics Anti-Saloon League Museum | Westerville Public Library What was the Anti-Saloon League? From 1893 to 1933, the Anti-Saloon League was a major force in American politics. Influencing the United States through lobbying and the printed word, it turned a moral crusade against the manufacture, sale and consumption of alcohol into the Prohibition Amendment to the United States Constitution. Under the motto "The Saloon Must Go," the organization worked to unify public anti-alcohol sentiment, enforce existing temperance laws and enact further anti-alcohol legislation. The League was able to promote the temperance cause by publishing thousands of fliers, pamphlets, songs, stories, cartoons, dramas, magazines and newspapers. How can I find more information? This website was created based on a large collection of Anti-Saloon League documents and artifacts, bequeathed to the Westerville Public Library.

Digital History We are very sorry, but you have reached a page that has moved or no longer exists. Please visit our home page to experience our new look and updated navigation. On August 8, 2012, Digital History switched to a new interface. We have been restructuring the database and the organization of Digital History for the past three years, and we feel this makeover will significantly improve the usability of our materials. In our new interface, materials are organized by era, so users will easily be able to view many different types of resources for a particular era such as the textbook, images, primary sources, multimedia and teacher materials. Although the links to our textbook, primary sources, and other educational materials changed in the new interface, we believe the benefits significantly outweigh any inconvenience. Please email Sara McNeil at smcneil@uh.edu if you have any questions about Digital History.

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