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Presidential Speech Archive - Miller Center of Public Affairs

Presidential Speech Archive - Miller Center of Public Affairs

http://millercenter.org/scripps/archive/speeches

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1945 to 21st Century home | 6th-15th centuries | 16-17th centuries | 18-19th centuries | 1901 to World War II Victors, Independence Movements and Cold War The United Nations – the founding, Roosevelt's hopes denied and the veto Victors against the Defeated – retributions, expropriations, occupations SoJust.net: Social Justice and Civil Rights Speeches Bella AbzugPlenary Address, Fourth World Congress on Women (1995) John AdamsInaugural Address (1797) Jane AddamsThe Subjective Necessity for Social Settlements (1892)The Modern Lear (1896) Susan B. AnthonyOn Women's Right to Vote (1872)

Video Nobel Lectures from Nobel Laureates in Literature Lists of Nobel Prizes and Laureates Video Lectures from Nobel Laureates in Literature According to the Nobel Foundation statutes, the Nobel Laureates are required "to give a lecture on a subject connected with the work for which the prize has been awarded". The lecture should be given before, or no later than six months after, the Nobel Prize Award Ceremony, which takes place in Stockholm or, in the case of the Peace Prize, in Oslo on 10 December. Click on the names of the Nobel Laureates in Literature below to see their Nobel Lectures.

Logic Problems - Very Easy Logic Puzzles <p style="font-style:bold; color:red"> Warning: Solutions are currently displayed. To hide and show the solutions as desired, enable javascript on your browser </span></p> 1. The Camels Religion and the Founding of the American Republic This exhibition demonstrates that many of the colonies that in 1776 became the United States of America were settled by men and women of deep religious convictions who in the seventeenth century crossed the Atlantic Ocean to practice their faith freely. That the religious intensity of the original settlers would diminish to some extent over time was perhaps to be expected, but new waves of eighteenth century immigrants brought their own religious fervor across the Atlantic and the nation's first major religious revival in the middle of the eighteenth century injected new vigor into American religion. The result was that a religious people rose in rebellion against Great Britain in 1776, and that most American statesmen, when they began to form new governments at the state and national levels, shared the convictions of most of their constituents that religion was, to quote Alexis de Tocqueville's observation, indispensable to the maintenance of republican institutions.

American Rhetoric: Online Speech Bank "Five score years ago, a great American, in whose symbolic shadow we stand today, signed the Emancipation Proclamation. This momentous decree came as a great beacon light of hope to millions of Negro slaves who had been seared in the flames of withering injustice. It came as a joyous daybreak to end the long night of their captivity."

99 Mind Mapping Resources, Tools, and Tips So, there you are staring at that black sheet of paper again. Or perhaps it's a black Word document on your computer screen. Whichever it may be, it's obvious you're about to take notes for that big essay assignment or group project, and you're not too excited about getting started! The African American Odyssey: A Quest for Full Citizenship The exhibition The African American Odyssey: A Quest for Full Citizenship, showcases the incomparable African American collections of the Library of Congress. Displaying more than 240 items, including books, government documents, manuscripts, maps, musical scores, plays, films, and recordings, this is the largest black history exhibit ever held at the Library, and the first exhibition of any kind to feature presentations in all three of the Library's buildings. The major presentation in the Jefferson Building, The African American Odyssey: A Quest for Full Citizenship, explored black America's quest for equality from the early national period through the twentieth century. The items in this exhibit attest to the drama and achievement of this remarkable story.

The Landmark Speeches of Martin Luther King, Jr. - A Call to Conscience: New York: IPM/Warner Books Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., is known for being one of the greatest orators of the twentieth century, and perhaps in all of American history. In the 1950s and 1960s, his words led the Civil Rights Movement and helped change society. He is best known for helping achieve civil equality for African Americans, but these speeches--selected because they were each presented at a turning point in the Civil Rights Movement--show that his true goal was much larger than that: He hoped to achieve acceptance for all people, regardless of race or nationality. This companion volume to A Knock at Midnight features the landmark speeches of his career, including: "I Have a Dream"; his acceptance speech for the Nobel Peace Prize; his eulogy for the young victims of the Birmingham church bombing; and "I've Been to the Mountaintop," the last speech he gave before his death.

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