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Temperance & Prohibition

Temperance & Prohibition
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Finding Aid on the Cold War Compiled by Tim Wehrkamp Contents Preface Introduction Records in Presidential Libraries Comprehensive Subject Matter Records Newsreels and Television Broadcasts Record Group 306 (Records of the United States Information Agency) Still Pictures and Motion Pictures Textual Records Electronic Records Record Group 273 (Records of the National Security Council) Textual Records Records of the Military Textual Records Electronic Records Donated Material Still Pictures Motion Pictures Intelligence Records Textual Records Reconnaissance and Satellite Imagery Foreign Policy Records Textual Records Still Pictures Records of Congress Textual Records Appendix I: List of Record Groups (RG) Cited in Reference Information Paper 107 Appendix II: Sources of Additional Information About Records or Finding Aids Described in Reference Information Paper 107 End Notes Preface NARA's descriptive program comprises a variety of information products. John W. Introduction Records in Presidential Libraries

The Civil Rights Act of 1964: A Long Struggle for Freedom President Lyndon Johnson speaking to the nation from the White House prior to signing the Civil Rights Bill into law, while (left to right) Attorney General Robert F. Kennedy, Senate Minority Leader Everett M. Dirksen, Senator Hubert Humphrey, AFL/CIO President George Meany, Martin Luther King, Jr., and Representative Emanuel Celler listen, July 2, 1964. Prints and Photographs Division, Library of Congress September 10, 2014–January 2, 2016 This exhibition, which commemorates the fiftieth anniversary of the landmark Civil Rights Act of 1964, explores the events that shaped the civil rights movement, as well as the far-reaching impact the act had on a changing society. The Civil Rights Act of 1964: A Long Struggle for Freedom is made possible by a generous grant from Newman’s Own Foundation and with additional support from HISTORY®. Southwest Gallery, Second Floor, Thomas Jefferson Building

arts-crafts University of Virginia Library Religion and the Founding of the American Republic | Exhibitions This exhibition demonstrates that many of the colonies that in 1776 became the United States of America were settled by men and women of deep religious convictions who in the seventeenth century crossed the Atlantic Ocean to practice their faith freely. That the religious intensity of the original settlers would diminish to some extent over time was perhaps to be expected, but new waves of eighteenth century immigrants brought their own religious fervor across the Atlantic and the nation's first major religious revival in the middle of the eighteenth century injected new vigor into American religion. The result was that a religious people rose in rebellion against Great Britain in 1776, and that most American statesmen, when they began to form new governments at the state and national levels, shared the convictions of most of their constituents that religion was, to quote Alexis de Tocqueville's observation, indispensable to the maintenance of republican institutions.

Photographs from the Golden Age of Jazz The Library of Congress Music Division, Library of Congress Search by Keyword | Browse by Name | Subject | Venue The William P. Gottlieb Collection, comprising over sixteen hundred photographs of celebrated jazz artists, documents the jazz scene from 1938 to 1948, primarily in New York City and Washington, D.C. The mission of the Library of Congress is to make its resources available and useful to Congress and the American people and to sustain and preserve a universal collection of knowledge and creativity for future generations. The Library of Congress presents these documents as part of the record of the past. Special Presentations In His Own Words: Photos and Commentary by William Gottlieb Gottlieb on Assignment American Memory | Search All Collections | Collection Finder | Teachers

Our Documents - 100 Milestone Documents The following is a list of 100 milestone documents, compiled by the National Archives and Records Administration, and drawn primarily from its nationwide holdings. The documents chronicle United States history from 1776 to 1965. Complete List of Documents Please note that you can always use the thumbnail images at the top of every page to navigate directly to any of the 100 Milestone Documents. home 100 milestone documents the people's vote tools for educators news & events national competitions about this site contact information related resources search Privacy & Use Accessibility Women and Social Movements in the United States, 1600-2000 The Margaret Sanger Papers Project Margaret Sanger lived a long and productive life. Acutely aware of her position as a reformer and the historical importance of her work, Sanger preserved her papers, dividing them between the Library of Congress and Smith College. Though she originally made a distinction between her "professional" papers, which were to be given to the Library of Congress, and her "personal" papers, which were to go to Smith College, in practice that distinction was not followed rigidly, and both collections contain personal and professional material. These collections are large and cover much of her life; a reader will most likely need to consult both collections for information on any given issue. Though Sanger contacted her associates in the 1940s and the 1950s, urging them to send her the letters she had written them so that they could be preserved in her collection, she did not recover all of them.

Anti-Saloon League Museum | Westerville Public Library What was the Anti-Saloon League? From 1893 to 1933, the Anti-Saloon League was a major force in American politics. Influencing the United States through lobbying and the printed word, it turned a moral crusade against the manufacture, sale and consumption of alcohol into the Prohibition Amendment to the United States Constitution. Under the motto "The Saloon Must Go," the organization worked to unify public anti-alcohol sentiment, enforce existing temperance laws and enact further anti-alcohol legislation. At first, the League appealed to local churches to carry its message to the people. Once they had established a loyal following, the League leaders focused their efforts on getting individual politicians elected who supported the cause. The League was able to promote the temperance cause by publishing thousands of fliers, pamphlets, songs, stories, cartoons, dramas, magazines and newspapers. How can I find more information?

Virtual Reading Room Documents Search This search is based upon locating specified words in the electronic text of documents. However, in many cases, this is dependent upon the conversion of the text in paper documents to electronic text through optical character recognition (OCR). Because of age and condition of some paper documents, the OCR may not recognize certain characters and words correctly. Please keep this in mind when using full text search, as these anomalies may affect the results of your search for relevant documents using your search criteria. Please Note Some of the documents in the Virtual Reading Room are those of other federal agencies. The African American Odyssey: A Quest for Full Citizenship | Exhibitions The exhibition The African American Odyssey: A Quest for Full Citizenship, showcases the incomparable African American collections of the Library of Congress. Displaying more than 240 items, including books, government documents, manuscripts, maps, musical scores, plays, films, and recordings, this is the largest black history exhibit ever held at the Library, and the first exhibition of any kind to feature presentations in all three of the Library's buildings. The major presentation in the Jefferson Building, The African American Odyssey: A Quest for Full Citizenship, explored black America's quest for equality from the early national period through the twentieth century. The items in this exhibit attest to the drama and achievement of this remarkable story.

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