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Studying with music: help or hindrance? By Heather Sanders Last year Emelie received a pair of URBANEARS headphones for her birthday. Since then they have become a semi-permanent attachment to her head when studying. Emelie purports that listening to her tunes actually helps her concentrate and stay focused. Since she gets her work completed, seems to retain what she studies, and maintains high grades, Jeff and I have allowed her to continue using them even though we are not entirely certain this level of multi-tasking is the wisest choice. Just as there is a growing body of research citing that our heavily plugged-in lifestyles may actually be bad for our brains, there is also research that seemingly proves students cannot study and listen to music at the same time.

5 Powerful Questions Teachers Can Ask Students My first year teaching a literacy coach came to observe my classroom. After the students left, she commented on how I asked the whole class a question, would wait just a few seconds, and then answer it myself. "It's cute," she added. The Most Useful Everyday Phrases in English Traditional English language textbooks and courses will do a great job of introducing you to vocabulary and grammar, but they don't always teach you the important everyday phrases in English. When students visit an English-speaking country, they can sometimes be confused by some of these phrases. Click Here for Step-by-Step Rules, Stories and Exercises to Practice All English Tenses Sometimes the problems are because pronunciation is different in spoken English, and sometimes the problems are because English speakers use idioms that cannot be translated literally into another language. When you are learning everyday phrases, it is important to learn if they are formal, informal or slang. Here are some examples:

CTE - Collaborative Learning What is collaborative learning? What is the impact of collaborative learning or group work? What are some examples of collaborative learning activities? The 10 Best Web Tools For Flipped Classrooms While flipping the classroom is still one of the hottest trends in education, it’s got nothing on time-saving and downright useful apps and web tools. In an effort to provide a quick look at some of the best web tools for flipped classrooms, I thought it would be useful to poll the @Edudemic Twitter followers. Including the tweets, I also got at least 40 emails from friends, colleagues, and administrators from around the world. Italo Calvino Offers 14 Reasons We Should Read the Classics In a previous post, we brought you the voice of Italian fantasist Italo Calvino, reading from his Invisible Cities and Mr. Palomar. Both of those works, as with all of Calvino’s fiction, make oblique references to wide swaths of classical literature, but Calvino is no show-off, dropping in allusions for their own sake, nor is it really necessary to have read as widely as the author to truly appreciate his work, as in the case of certain modernist masters. Instead, Calvino’s fiction tends to cast a spell on readers, inspiring them to seek out far-flung ancient romances and strange folktales, to immerse themselves in other worlds contained within the covers of other books.

Think-Pair-Share Variations Learning is a collaborative venture. The more we can provide opportunities for our students to think, collaborate and learn from each other – the more we are preparing them for their futures! Do you use the strategy Think-Pair-Share in your classroom? The Think-Pair-Share strategy is a three-step collaborative learning structure developed by Dr. Frank Lyman in 1981. It is a relatively low-risk and is ideally suited for instructors and students who are new to collaborative learning. Discussion topics for English language learners TedPower.co.uk Prepare for Discussion A work-scheme for Higher Intermediate & Advanced Level ESL Students 01 Alternative Beliefs 02 Animal Welfare 03 The Arts

Flipped Classroom 2.0: Competency Learning With Videos The flipped classroom model generated a lot of excitement initially, but more recently some educators — even those who were initial advocates — have expressed disillusionment with the idea of assigning students to watch instructional videos at home and work on problem solving and practice in class. Biggest criticisms: watching videos of lectures wasn’t all that revolutionary, that it perpetuated bad teaching and raised questions about equal access to digital technology. Now flipped classroom may have reached equilibrium, neither loved nor hated, just another potential tool for teachers — if done well. “You never want to get stuck in a rut and keep doing the same thing over and over,” said Aaron Sams, a former high school chemistry teacher turned consultant who helped pioneer flipped classroom learning in an edWeb webinar.

Teachers: Involve parents in the flipped classroom, too At the beginning of each semester I spend time speaking to my students about what the flipped classroom is: a significant change over the way students have previously been taught. As a result, I explain what the benefits of the flipped classroom are, what an average day will look like, and how students will be assessed, among many other things. I work hard to paint a positive picture to get students on my side. And change can be scary! I explain that students will have less homework than they have ever had in a math class, how they will not be forced to listen to their teacher lecture for the majority of class, and how classroom time will be spent working with others and being active in their learning.

Anne Frank and her family were also denied entry as refugees to the U.S. Portrait of Anne Frank at age 12, sitting at her desk at the Montessori school in Amsterdam. (Courtesy Anne Frank House, Amsterdam) Many have noted the historical parallels between the current debate over Syrians seeking refuge in the United States and the plight of European Jews fleeing German-occupied territories on the eve of World War II. 8 ways teachers can talk less and get kids talking more If you do fewer teacher-directed activities, that means the kids will naturally do more talking, doesn’t it? Not necessarily. I have often found myself talking almost constantly during group work and student-directed projects because I’m trying to push kids’ thinking, provide feedback, and help them stay on task. Even when the learning has been turned over to the students, it’s still tempting to spend too much time giving directions, repeating important information, and telling students how they did instead of asking them to reflect on their work. Here are 8 ways teachers can talk less and get students talking more: 1.

Crossword Puzzle Games - Create Puzzles Create A Crossword Puzzle Enter up to 20 words and hints (clues) below to create your own puzzles. There's no need to use all 20 words, you could use as little as two. Hints can be left blank. This free online crossword creator software can be a great tool for educators. Add puzzles to web sites for fun. The Flipped Class: Myths vs. Reality Editor's Note: On the heels of our viral posts in over 100 countries about the flipped classroom earlier this year (links below), we asked Jon Bergmann if he could share some of the feedback he was receiving in light of the notable interest about this topic. The timing couldn't have been more perfect since he was about to leave for a conference about you-guessed-it, the flipped class. Here is Part 1 of our three part series The Daily Riff. See Part 2 and 3 links below. - C.J.

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