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Visual thinking basics

Visual thinking basics
Related:  Visual Thinking

Visual thinking school Visual thinking is a way to organize your thoughts and improve your ability to think and communicate. It’s a way to expand your range and capacity by going beyond the linear world of the written word, list and spreadsheet, and entering the non-linear world of complex spacial relationships, networks, maps and diagrams. It’s also about using tools — like pen and paper, index cards and software tools — to externalize your internal thinking processes, making them more clear, explicit and actionable. Why is visual thinking important? There’s more information at your fingertips than ever before, and yet people are overwhelmed by it. When faced with too much information we shut down. We think in pictures. Think you can’t draw? Squiggle birds (I learned squiggle birds from my friend Chris Glynn). So why is visual thinking important? The whirl. Visualization is increasingly used in business and science to simplify complexity: a picture is worth a thousand words. This is a fallacy. How to draw a car.

Name Every Shade of the Rainbow With This 'Color Thesaurus' Driving along the highway in Didcot, England, you may notice something strange: the road signs point the way to places like Neverland and Middle-earth. The names of these and other fictional locales from literature were seamlessly added to road signs by an artist/prankster using Transport Medium, the official font of British road signs. After some sleuthing, BBC News found the man responsible, who spoke to the outlet on the condition of anonymity. Oxfordshire County Council isn't laughing; it told the BBC that although the signs were "on the surface amusing," they were "vandalism" and potentially dangerous, since it would be hard for a driver who spotted one not to do a double take while their eyes were supposed to be on the road. Jackie Billington, Didcot's mayor, recognizes that the signs have an upside. There are five altered signs in total. See the signs here and in the video below. [h/t BBC News]

Napkin Sketch Workbook by Don Moyer: Education Words are great, but some messages are hard to communicate with words alone. That's why we need visual explanations—charts, figures, diagrams. This workbook inspires all writers to create better visual explanations and shares practical techniques you can apply right away—even if you think you can't draw. The workbook includes many exercises you can use to practice new skills and build confidence. Developed to support Don's workshop for writers, presented at the annual conference of the Society for Technical Communication. About the Author Don Moyer Foglifter Pittsburgh, PA, USA Don Moyer is a writer and designer who enjoys helping businesses communicate important ideas by making messages visible. Publish Date December 29, 2010 Dimensions Pocket 172 pgs Black and White printing (on cream uncoated paper) Category Education Tags visual explanation , napkin sketch … , Society for Technical Communications , Netflix , Shopatron , ThoughtForm , STC , preview , workbook , draw

Identify a Lie with 6 Simple Questions post written by: Marc Chernoff Email We all fall victim to at least a few lies during the course of our lifetime. A lie can travel halfway around the world while the truth is putting on its shoes.- Mark Twain How do you know this? If you enjoyed this article, check out our new best-selling book. And get inspiring life tips and quotes in your inbox (it's free)... Color Psychology by David Johnson Like death and taxes, there is no escaping color. It is ubiquitous. Yet what does it all mean? Colors often have different meanings in various cultures. Black Black is the color of authority and power. White Brides wear white to symbolize innocence and purity. Red The most emotionally intense color, red stimulates a faster heartbeat and breathing. The most romantic color, pink, is more tranquilizing. Blue The color of the sky and the ocean, blue is one of the most popular colors. Green Currently the most popular decorating color, green symbolizes nature. Yellow Cheerful sunny yellow is an attention getter. Purple The color of royalty, purple connotes luxury, wealth, and sophistication. Brown Solid, reliable brown is the color of earth and is abundant in nature. Colors of the Flag In the U.S. flag, white stands for purity and innocence. Food for Thought While blue is one of the most popular colors it is one of the least appetizing.

Sketchnotes 101: The Basics of Visual Note-taking Welcome to the second article in the the new Core77 "Sketchnotes Channel" (www.core77.com/sketchnotes) where we'll be exploring the application of visual thinking tools in the worlds of design and creative thinking. So you say you're ready to start sketchnoting. Maybe you're not much of a sketcher but you take a lot of notes, and are interested in making them more meaningful and interesting, but you're afraid your drawings are too crude. For you, it's important to stress that sketchnotes—although they are inherently a visual medium—do not require drawing ability of any kind. Essentially they're about transforming ideas into visual communication; structuring thoughts and giving hierarchy to concepts can be completed with strictly text and a few lines. Maybe you're perpetually drawing and want to try and make your notes more useful and engaging but you are afraid of imposing structure to your normally freeform way of sketching. In the end, it's up to you. So let's get tactical.

Today Is Your Day To Win Collection: Visual thinking sketchnote-lessons Archives Color is a great way to add visual interest and guide people’s eyes to what you want them to focus on. Here’s Kevin Dulle’s sketchnote lesson on adding emphasis with shadows and color: Reposted with permission – check out his blog for more tips! If you’re starting out with sketchnotes, you don’t have to use color right away. You can always add color afterwards. You can also add color on the computer. Okay, so that takes care of the mechanics. Develop your personal style by looking for inspiration and experimenting with ideas. Here’s a sampler of different coloring styles I’ve played with in my sketchnotes: Sketchnote Army has a wide variety of sketchnoting styles. Like this?

Time on the Brain: How You Are Always Living In the Past, and Other Quirks of Perception I always knew we humans have a rather tenuous grip on the concept of time, but I never realized quite how tenuous it was until a couple of weeks ago, when I attended a conference on the nature of time organized by the Foundational Questions Institute. This meeting, even more than FQXi’s previous efforts, was a mashup of different disciplines: fundamental physics, philosophy, neuroscience, complexity theory. Crossing academic disciplines may be overrated, as physicist-blogger Sabine Hossenfelder has pointed out, but it sure is fun. Like Sabine, I spend my days thinking about planets, dark matter, black holes—they have become mundane to me. But brains—now there’s something exotic. Neuroscientist Kathleen McDermott of Washington University began by quoting famous memory researcher Endel Tulving, who called our ability to remember the past and to anticipate the future “mental time travel.” Tellingly, not only can he not recall the past, he can’t envision the future. Alas, they couldn’t.

10 Tips for Designing Presentations That Don't Suck: Pt.1 | Design Shack - StumbleUpon Powerpoint has produced more bad design in its day that perhaps any other digital tool in history with the possible exception of Microsoft paint. In this post we’re going to address the epidemic of bad presentation design with ten super practical tips for designer better looking and more professional presentations. Along the way we’ll see a number of awesome slide designs from Note & Point along with some custom examples built by yours truly. Let’s get started! Also be sure to check out 10 Tips for Designing Presentations That Don’t Suck: Pt.2! Not a Designer? Most of the content on this site is targeted specifically towards professional designers and developers, or at the very least those interested in getting started in this field. You’ve chosen a visual tool to communicate and should therefore take the time to learn a thing or two about visual communications. Follow the ten tips below and see if you don’t start getting comments about your awesome presentation design skills. Kuler Piknik

60 Small Ways to Improve Your Life in the Next 100 Days Contrary to popular belief, you don’t have to make drastic changes in order to notice an improvement in the quality of your life. At the same time, you don’t need to wait a long time in order to see the measurable results that come from taking positive action. All you have to do is take small steps, and take them consistently, for a period of 100 days. Below you’ll find 60 small ways to improve all areas of your life in the next 100 days. Home 1. Day 1: Declutter MagazinesDay 2: Declutter DVD’sDay 3: Declutter booksDay 4: Declutter kitchen appliances 2. If you take it out, put it back.If you open it, close it.If you throw it down, pick it up.If you take it off, hang it up. 3. A burnt light bulb that needs to be changed.A button that’s missing on your favorite shirt.The fact that every time you open your top kitchen cabinet all of the plastic food containers fall out. Happiness 4. 5. 6. How many times do you beat yourself up during the day? 7. Learning/Personal Development 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13.

How can I improve my short term memory? Q: How can I improve my mem­ory? Is there a daily exer­cise I can do to improve it? A: The most impor­tant com­po­nent of mem­ory is atten­tion. By choos­ing to attend to some­thing and focus on it, you cre­ate a per­sonal inter­ac­tion with it, which gives it per­sonal mean­ing, mak­ing it eas­ier to remember. Elab­o­ra­tion and rep­e­ti­tion are the most com­mon ways of cre­at­ing that per­sonal inter­ac­tion. Elab­o­ra­tion involves cre­at­ing a rich con­text for the expe­ri­ence by adding together visual, audi­tory, and other infor­ma­tion about the fact. One com­mon tech­nique used by stu­dents, is actu­ally, not that help­ful. These tech­niques do help you improve your mem­ory on a behav­ioral level, but not on a fun­da­men­tal brain struc­ture level. Focus Alert­ness, focus, con­cen­tra­tion, moti­va­tion, and height­ened aware­ness are largely a mat­ter of atti­tude. If you want to learn or remem­ber some­thing, con­cen­trate on just that one thing. Keep read­ing…

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