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Sketchnoting 101: How To Create Awesome Visual Notes -UX Mastery

Sketchnoting 101: How To Create Awesome Visual Notes -UX Mastery
The sketchnotes I created for the recent UX Australia and Swipe conferences have generated a lot of interest, and I’ve received a number of questions via email and Twitter about how I go about creating them. While it isn’t strictly related to UX Design, Jared Spool counts sketching as one of 5 indispensable skills that user experience designers should focus on, so it’s certainly a skill you should consider developing. With this in mind, I thought I’d break down the approach I take, and list some tips for others interested in getting started with sketchnoting. What is Sketchnoting? The term sketchnoting describes the style of visual note-taking that has become popular at tech conferences in the past few years. Mike Rohde has been the most vocal champion (he has a book coming out on the topic soon), and Eva-Lotta Lamm has been a prolific creator of the art form of late (she’s published a couple of books as well!).

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Blogging for English-Language Learners Blogging is a very powerful tool in and of itself. Whether it's a personal or professional blog, blogging has the power to unleash learning, reflection, and communication. Even more, a blog can help spread your words and ideas to a wider audience and, as a result, a wider reach. Blogging for English-language learners (ELLs) can tap into students' and teachers' utmost communicative potential and help expand and widen learning opportunities.

Tapping into Typography to Make Your Sketchnote Titles Stand Out I was browsing through the work of the Sketchnote Army a while back and found a sketch that I particularly liked, largely because of the variation in the fonts that the artist used to distinguish between different ideas. I realized that my own versatility with fonts was lacking, so I thought I would dedicate a week’s worth of Visual Vocabulary to the development of my typography skills. I’ve got a long way to go, but I’m glad to have branched out from my typical writing style. This week I have focused on title fonts, which are generally used once per sketch to let the audience know the topic of the sketch. I have given each font a name – some of which are standard, others my own. Eventually I would like to take a more formal look at typography, but for now imitating fonts that I like and coming up with my own names for them will work just fine.

Speaking Fast Company named Sunni one of the 100 Most Creative People in Business because of her advocacy of visual and game literacy (and because, like a true creative, she sometimes wears a bathrobe to work). This video shows the story of why doodling matters and it shows it, appropriately, in a storyboard-like format. Doodlers of the world, “Dr. Doodle” works tirelessly on your behalves. Enjoy! Mobo Sketchnotes Mobo Sketchnotes: sketching notes on a phone or tablet After reading Mike Rohde’s “The Sketchnote Handbook,” I wanted to try drawing my own sketchnote on a mobile device. Instead of a Moleskine notebook, I felt a mobile phone or tablet would be a perfect. A sketchnote is a visual map of a lecture or talk in real-time. I’d already enjoyed drawing personal roadmaps and other visual maps on my mobile devices, but a sketchnote was slightly different. Sketchnotes are real-time!

Story-centered design: hacking your brain to think like a user When I first started designing interactive products, it was a struggle. Small projects were fine. But when the interactions got more complex, I noticed that tools, team communication, and even my own thinking started breaking down. I see many startups facing these same problems today. So I wanted to share some of the ways that I’ve changed my design process over the years to handle the complexity of large products. iLoveTEFL by Christina Rebuffet-Broadus Last week (March 5, 2014 to be precise), Sue Kay and Karen Spiller of ELT Teacher2Writer led an hour-long webinar titled “How to Become an ELT Materials Writer.” The event was full of useful insider info on how the whole publishing industry works, the knowledge good writers need, and tips for aspiring authors from both publishers and accomplished writers. Rather than just write up classic verbal notes with their outlines, bullet points, and line after line of text-text-text like I usually do (which usually ends up stuffed on a shelf somewhere, sadly to rarely be read again), I decided to try something different: sketchnoting. While not all ideas are captured, I tried to get the essentials, sketch them up into something visual and memorable, all the while hoping they would make some sense to someone who didn’t attended the webinar.

The Sketchnote Typeface - Rohdesign MY SECRET WEAPON in designing The Sketchnote Handbook was a family of custom fonts. I saved literally hundreds of hours by using this typeface, produced in partnership with my friend, Delve Withrington of Delve Fonts I’m pleased to announce The Sketchnote Typeface is available for purchase! The typeface was in production for over a year, so it feels great to release it.

Learning to sketchnote Sketchnoting is the act of drawing to convey ideas. I think it has great potential to distinguish concepts from the glut of nondescript information online, and as a writer it’s a skill I want to learn. There are endless links and personalities in the sketchnote world. I’ve attempted to create a Twitter list to keep up with it. Austin Kleon’s blog is my favorite on the topic, and this 2010 Web expo talk by Eva Lotta-Lamm is probably the best introduction out there: Sketchnotes 101: The Basics of Visual Note-taking Welcome to the second article in the the new Core77 "Sketchnotes Channel" (www.core77.com/sketchnotes) where we'll be exploring the application of visual thinking tools in the worlds of design and creative thinking. So you say you're ready to start sketchnoting. Maybe you're not much of a sketcher but you take a lot of notes, and are interested in making them more meaningful and interesting, but you're afraid your drawings are too crude.

Chinese Mobile App UI Trends This summer, I packed up all my things and moved from San Francisco to Guangzhou, China for work. Through an unlikely chain of coincidences that I don’t entirely recall, I’ve become a product manager on WeChat, a popular messaging app in China. Moving to a new country has meant learning how to do lots of things differently: speaking a new language, eating, shopping, getting around. eTools for Language Teachers Sketchnoting (or visual note-taking)(Click here for a presentation called "Sketchnoting for Beginners". Click here to see my sketchnotes on Flickr.) She told me that she made them with an iPad app called “Paper by fifty-three”. Well, I immediately downloaded the app and my journey into sketchnoting began. Sketchnoting is simply a way to take notes in a more visually attractive way than bullet points.

The Sketchnote Typeface The Sketchnote Typeface was born of necessity: veteran designer and illustrator Mike Rohde needed a series of hand-drawn fonts to produce his recent book, The Sketchnote Handbook (2012, Peachpit Press). Because of its origin, the typeface was designed to be practical, to convey the human character and quirks of Rohde’s normal handwriting and unique hand-drawn lettering with the benefits inherent in digital fonts. More… Sketchnote Square is a bold, somewhat compressed headline type that complements the Sketchnote Text fonts. Drawn instead of written, the characters in Square have neat little happenstance voids within the strokes. Square also includes a handy selection of fun icons, rules, and arrows—some functional tidbits for your design projects.

visual recording on the iPad, illustrated – Ninmah Meets World This week I’ll be giving a talk at IFVP 2010 on visual recording with the iPad. While I was preparing my notes, I discovered how easy it is to make Quicktime movies of your notes with the Brushes app, so I made a little movie. Then I got carried away narrating it and adding in other images and … well, it’s almost 13 minutes long now, and if you watch it, you can skip my talk. Though I’m better in person, and there are a few things I didn’t put into the movie. How To Capture Ideas Visually With The iPad By its very design, the iPad promotes consumption. Essentially an interactive mobile screen, the combination of physical form and supporting software-based user interface on Apple’s wunder-tablet suggests watching and listening, enabling you to tear the “monitor” off the desk and take it with you. By lacking a keyboard, input and production aren’t quite as natural. That isn’t necessarily because the iPad can’t accommodate such input, but rather that the software–and our habits as users–haven’t completely caught up with the not-insignificant shift in interface. But it doesn’t have to be that way. One microcosm of the potential of the iPad in learning is the concept of visual recording.

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