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Sketchnotes: Building my visual vocabulary

Sketchnotes: Building my visual vocabulary
Okay, I’ve figured more stuff out in terms of expanding my visual vocabulary! =) Here’s my current workflow. Goals: Pick up different ways to draw things by analyzing other people’s sketchnotesGet faster at drawing things through practiceDevelop a visual dictionary of words and imagesDraw my own versions and organize them for easy reuse I get a lot of exposure to other people’s sketchnotes in the process of adding material to which now indexes 89 artists. I’m slowly working through them in order, clipping rectangular regions that have images that I’d like to file or draw. I’ve also been drawing my way through the Bikablo® series of books from Neuland. Here’s a sample: I’m looking forward to finishing that and the Bikablo v2 book, filing the individual sketches, and then going through my visual library of other people’s sketchnote elements to draw even more of those… Lots of things to draw!

http://sachachua.com/blog/2013/03/sketchnotes-building-my-visual-vocabulary/

Related:  Sketchnotes and Visual Thinkingoutils de pensée visuelle

industrial design magazine + resource / Sketchnotes category "It nearly moved me to tears," a Ford executive once said of a Michael Santoro car design. "It's the best set of proportions I've ever seen on a sedan." In the early '90s Santoro was an upstart designer largely responsible for turning Chrysler's fortunes around with his radical cab-forward concepts and dropped-headlight-fender trucks, and me and my ID classmates were lucky enough to visit his Detroit studio. There we saw some of the most mind-blowing ID sketching I've ever seen, all done in one color with a Berol Prismacolor. His line quality was unbelievable: While there were sketch marks all over the page, Santoro could unerringly hit the same curve or corner he wanted to emphasize 40, 50, 60 times, with his precisely built-up strokes creating more pop than a Pepsi factory. I thought of this as I saw, of all things, these "Where People Run" maps released by Dr.

visual recording on the iPad, illustrated – Ninmah Meets World This week I’ll be giving a talk at IFVP 2010 on visual recording with the iPad. While I was preparing my notes, I discovered how easy it is to make Quicktime movies of your notes with the Brushes app, so I made a little movie. Then I got carried away narrating it and adding in other images and … well, it’s almost 13 minutes long now, and if you watch it, you can skip my talk. Though I’m better in person, and there are a few things I didn’t put into the movie. Ah HAH. Tapping into Typography to Make Your Sketchnote Titles Stand Out I was browsing through the work of the Sketchnote Army a while back and found a sketch that I particularly liked, largely because of the variation in the fonts that the artist used to distinguish between different ideas. I realized that my own versatility with fonts was lacking, so I thought I would dedicate a week’s worth of Visual Vocabulary to the development of my typography skills. I’ve got a long way to go, but I’m glad to have branched out from my typical writing style.

Inkflow: The Visual Thinking App for iPad, iPhone, and iPod Touch Visual Thinkers Rejoice! Inkflow works like a Word Processor for Visual Thinking. Capture your ideas as easily as with pen and paper, then arrange and reorganize them with your fingers! The Sketchnote Typeface - Rohdesign MY SECRET WEAPON in designing The Sketchnote Handbook was a family of custom fonts. I saved literally hundreds of hours by using this typeface, produced in partnership with my friend, Delve Withrington of Delve Fonts I’m pleased to announce The Sketchnote Typeface is available for purchase! The typeface was in production for over a year, so it feels great to release it. Creating The Sketchnote Typeface Family

The Sketchnote Typeface The Sketchnote Typeface was born of necessity: veteran designer and illustrator Mike Rohde needed a series of hand-drawn fonts to produce his recent book, The Sketchnote Handbook (2012, Peachpit Press). Because of its origin, the typeface was designed to be practical, to convey the human character and quirks of Rohde’s normal handwriting and unique hand-drawn lettering with the benefits inherent in digital fonts. More…

Sketchnote School: 6 Steps to Great Conference Sketchnotes Communicating visually is one of those skills many believe they can’t achieve. There are others on the interwebs and authors of books that have extensive examples, tutorials, and styles to help you get started. Even with great books like Dan Roam’s, Back of the Napkin and Mike Rohde’s book, The Sketchnote Handbook some still struggle with the idea of capturing what they see in their “mind’s eye” and transferring those concepts to paper. My Sketchbooks This is my spin on the craft. Many of you that know me know that I sketch…a lot!

Manifesto « Doodle Revolution We, the Doodlers of every nation, in order to form a more perfect world, establish semantic truth, promote whole-minded learning, provide for the struggling knowledge worker and student, enhance educational well-being, and secure the benefits of the Doodle for ourselves and our posterity, do ordain and establish this Manifesto for Doodlers everywhere. —Set Forth by the Founding Infodoodlers this 14th day of February of the Year 2011 to doodle (modern defn.): to dawdle; to draw something without thinking; to scrawl aimlessly; to make meaningless marks; to do something of little value, substance or import; to do nothing. Contrary to popular belief, THERE IS NO SUCH THING AS A MINDLESS DOODLE. The very act of creating a Doodle necessarily engages the mind.

classes by seanwes As a professor of Graphic Design, hand lettering is not only an integral part of my curriculum but also an important personal endeavor. I am always looking for ways to improve both my own skill as well as classroom pedagogy, so I immediately signed up when I found Sean would be teaching a hand lettering workshop in Orlando, Florida. Sean's class was relaxed, fun, yet incredibly informative, providing knowledge in areas important for all skill levels. I left the workshop feeling more confident in my own abilities, and had a handful of new information I could take back to share with my graphic design students. I am incredibly excited to see Sean is offering online classes in hand lettering.

Mobo Sketchnotes Mobo Sketchnotes: sketching notes on a phone or tablet After reading Mike Rohde’s “The Sketchnote Handbook,” I wanted to try drawing my own sketchnote on a mobile device. Instead of a Moleskine notebook, I felt a mobile phone or tablet would be a perfect. VISUAL NOTE-TAKING by Austin Kleon [ Watch a high-quality HD version on Vimeo ] I was invited to draw TEDxAustin this weekend. I was skeptical about an event that was so secretive about its contents beforehand, but it far exceeded my expectations. It was well-planned, well-executed, and had a stellar lineup of speakers. I bumped into lots of great people and had some good conversations. Kudos to the team, and thanks to my buddy Sunni Brown for the invite!

#Sketchnotes: Characters and Locations Sketchontes are inherently about letting, borders, arrows, visual concepts, and other adornments. I’ve seen many well-drawn and formatted sketchnotes that did not have a single character. So why am I dedicating a weekly post to just characters and locations? Because this is my favorite part of Sketchnoting…the doodling part!

We're Not in Kansas Anymore: Why Doodlers are the New NOW Monday, March 17, 2014 Note: This is the first of five posts on changing the way we think. The article was originally published on LinkedIn’s Influencer publishing platform. Five glorious presentations on visual thinking Do you think in words or pictures, or both? Visual thinking engages the part of the brain that handles visual processing, and is said to be both "emotional and creative" so you can "organise information in an intuitive and simultaneous way". A picture really might be worth a thousand words, while being easier to understand and recall. Therefore it is worth exploring how visual thinking can help you communicate ideas to colleagues and clients.

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