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Web Data Mining - An Introduction

Web Data Mining - An Introduction
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100+ Awesome Open Courseware Links for Artists | ArtCareer.net Posted by Site Administrator in Learning Tools Nov 20th, 2008 By Kelsey Allen Whether you’re into art theory, studying ancient art or making art yourself, you can find a range of online courses and lectures that can help educate you on your field of interest. Check out these open courseware resources to learn more, get fresh perspectives and expand your artistic horizons. Introductory Courses Learn the basics from these courses geared towards the beginner. Introduction to Sculpture : This course will deal with issues central to modern sculpture like site, context, process, psychology and aesthetics as well as helping students to work with some more non-traditional materials. Images and Online Exhibits These museums and online exhibits are wonderful places to find free and public domain images for inspiration or scholarly art study . Smithsonian American Art Museum Online Exhibitions : The SAAM has a number of online exhibits that range from landscape painting to modern photography.

Open Source Data Mining Tools | Elastic Web Mining | Bixo Labs Below is a report on the open source data mining tools session at the ACM data mining unconference this past Sunday (01 Nov 2009). This only covers tools that the panelists had used, so it’s not a survey of the available tools. See Jeff Dalton’s blog post on Java Open Source NLP and Text Mining tools for an example of a more complete list of a closely related group of tools. Weka Paul O’Rorke talked about Weka, a collection of machine learning algorithms for data mining tasks. An attendee mentioned MOA. R Language David Smith talked about R. Attendee asked about comparing Matlab & R, with respect to viability in a production environment. Attendee said many people use R for prototyping and generating models, but production uses something else. Paul mentioned that R provides a very compact representation of data mining tasks. Nicolas Cebron talked about KNIME (pronounced “naim”), a modular data exploration platform. Attendee asked about long-term viability of KNIME. Mahout Hadoop Bixo

The Visual Leap - About Visual Thinking >> Home • About Visual Thinking About Visual Thinking Visual thinking, also called visual learning, is a proven method of organizing ideas graphically - with concept maps, mind maps and webs. Scientifically based research demonstrates that visual learning techniques improve memory, organization, critical thinking and planning. Visual thinking is an intuitive and easy-to-learn strategy that works for many academic and professional projects. The more complex the task or idea, the more useful this approach can be. Visual Leap programs use visual thinking software as a learning tool, and this software accelerates the learning process. According to studies conducted by the Institute for the Advancement of Research in Education, visual learning techniques improve: Test scores Writing Proficiency Long-term Retention Reading Comprehension Thinking and Learning Skills Visual thinking is intuitive. Visual thinking is easy to learn. Joseph D. 37% of people are visual-spatial learners.

Web Data Harvesting: Web Scraping Software Web scraping software is an innovative tool that makes gathering lots of information relatively easy. The program has numerous implications for anyone who has the need to search for comparable information from various locations and put it into usable context. This method of finding extensive information in a short period of time is cost effective. Applications are used everyday for business, medicine, meteorology, government, and law enforcement. The software is user friendly and can be operated by anyone from non-tech data collectors to experienced Web designers. A user enters the software and begins by programming an “agent”, this is the tool that will retrieve any and all information. Web scraping software provides customer information, marketing information, and competitor information. There have been legal ramifications as some have complained about intrusion and copyright infringement. Screen Scraper

Home - Visual Thinking Strategies Carrot2 - Open Source Search Results Clustering Engine How can I improve my short term memory? Q: How can I improve my mem­ory? Is there a daily exer­cise I can do to improve it? A: The most impor­tant com­po­nent of mem­ory is atten­tion. By choos­ing to attend to some­thing and focus on it, you cre­ate a per­sonal inter­ac­tion with it, which gives it per­sonal mean­ing, mak­ing it eas­ier to remember. Elab­o­ra­tion and rep­e­ti­tion are the most com­mon ways of cre­at­ing that per­sonal inter­ac­tion. One com­mon tech­nique used by stu­dents, is actu­ally, not that help­ful. These tech­niques do help you improve your mem­ory on a behav­ioral level, but not on a fun­da­men­tal brain struc­ture level. Focus Alert­ness, focus, con­cen­tra­tion, moti­va­tion, and height­ened aware­ness are largely a mat­ter of atti­tude. If you want to learn or remem­ber some­thing, con­cen­trate on just that one thing. Strat­egy: When you learn some­thing new, take breaks so that the facts won’t inter­fere with one another as you study them. Keep read­ing…

60 Small Ways to Improve Your Life in the Next 100 Days Contrary to popular belief, you don’t have to make drastic changes in order to notice an improvement in the quality of your life. At the same time, you don’t need to wait a long time in order to see the measurable results that come from taking positive action. All you have to do is take small steps, and take them consistently, for a period of 100 days. Below you’ll find 60 small ways to improve all areas of your life in the next 100 days. Home 1. Day 1: Declutter MagazinesDay 2: Declutter DVD’sDay 3: Declutter booksDay 4: Declutter kitchen appliances 2. If you take it out, put it back.If you open it, close it.If you throw it down, pick it up.If you take it off, hang it up. 3. A burnt light bulb that needs to be changed.A button that’s missing on your favorite shirt.The fact that every time you open your top kitchen cabinet all of the plastic food containers fall out. Happiness 4. 5. 6. How many times do you beat yourself up during the day? 7. Learning/Personal Development 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13.

Time on the Brain: How You Are Always Living In the Past, and Other Quirks of Perception I always knew we humans have a rather tenuous grip on the concept of time, but I never realized quite how tenuous it was until a couple of weeks ago, when I attended a conference on the nature of time organized by the Foundational Questions Institute. This meeting, even more than FQXi’s previous efforts, was a mashup of different disciplines: fundamental physics, philosophy, neuroscience, complexity theory. Crossing academic disciplines may be overrated, as physicist-blogger Sabine Hossenfelder has pointed out, but it sure is fun. Like Sabine, I spend my days thinking about planets, dark matter, black holes—they have become mundane to me. Neuroscientist Kathleen McDermott of Washington University began by quoting famous memory researcher Endel Tulving, who called our ability to remember the past and to anticipate the future “mental time travel.” McDermott outlined the case of Patient K.C., who has even worse amnesia than the better-known H.M. on whom the film Memento was based.

Visual thinking school Visual thinking is a way to organize your thoughts and improve your ability to think and communicate. It’s a way to expand your range and capacity by going beyond the linear world of the written word, list and spreadsheet, and entering the non-linear world of complex spacial relationships, networks, maps and diagrams. It’s also about using tools — like pen and paper, index cards and software tools — to externalize your internal thinking processes, making them more clear, explicit and actionable. Why is visual thinking important? There’s more information at your fingertips than ever before, and yet people are overwhelmed by it. We think in pictures. Think you can’t draw? Squiggle birds (I learned squiggle birds from my friend Chris Glynn). So why is visual thinking important? The whirl. Visualization is increasingly used in business and science to simplify complexity: a picture is worth a thousand words. Drawing is a natural process for thinking, exploring ideas and learning. 1. 2. 3. 4.

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