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How can I improve my short term memory?

How can I improve my short term memory?
Q: How can I improve my mem­ory? Is there a daily exer­cise I can do to improve it? A: The most impor­tant com­po­nent of mem­ory is atten­tion. By choos­ing to attend to some­thing and focus on it, you cre­ate a per­sonal inter­ac­tion with it, which gives it per­sonal mean­ing, mak­ing it eas­ier to remember. Elab­o­ra­tion and rep­e­ti­tion are the most com­mon ways of cre­at­ing that per­sonal inter­ac­tion. One com­mon tech­nique used by stu­dents, is actu­ally, not that help­ful. These tech­niques do help you improve your mem­ory on a behav­ioral level, but not on a fun­da­men­tal brain struc­ture level. Focus Alert­ness, focus, con­cen­tra­tion, moti­va­tion, and height­ened aware­ness are largely a mat­ter of atti­tude. If you want to learn or remem­ber some­thing, con­cen­trate on just that one thing. Strat­egy: When you learn some­thing new, take breaks so that the facts won’t inter­fere with one another as you study them. Keep read­ing… Related:  Visual ThinkingMemory improvement

60 Small Ways to Improve Your Life in the Next 100 Days Contrary to popular belief, you don’t have to make drastic changes in order to notice an improvement in the quality of your life. At the same time, you don’t need to wait a long time in order to see the measurable results that come from taking positive action. All you have to do is take small steps, and take them consistently, for a period of 100 days. Below you’ll find 60 small ways to improve all areas of your life in the next 100 days. Home 1. Day 1: Declutter MagazinesDay 2: Declutter DVD’sDay 3: Declutter booksDay 4: Declutter kitchen appliances 2. If you take it out, put it back.If you open it, close it.If you throw it down, pick it up.If you take it off, hang it up. 3. A burnt light bulb that needs to be changed.A button that’s missing on your favorite shirt.The fact that every time you open your top kitchen cabinet all of the plastic food containers fall out. Happiness 4. 5. 6. How many times do you beat yourself up during the day? 7. Learning/Personal Development 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13.

5 Simple Ways to Increase Your Intelligence Your brain needs exercise just like a muscle. If you use it often and in the right ways, you will become a more skilled thinker and increase your ability to focus. But if you never use your brain, or abuse it with harmful chemicals, your ability to think and learn will deteriorate. Here are 5 simple ways anyone can squeeze a bit more productivity out of the old gray matter. 1. Don’t you feel drained after a couple hours of TV? When you feel like relaxing, try reading a book instead. 2. 3. Once you get used to reading challenging books, I think you’ll find that you aren’t tempted to go back to page-turners. 4. If you have the opportunity, take 10-20 minute naps when you are hit with a wave of drowsiness. 5. I’m not saying you need to sit on the floor cross-legged and chant ‘ommm’. Conclusion – I hope you aren’t disappointed that none of the techniques I’ve proposed are revolutionary.

100+ Online Resources That Are Transforming Education Yury Lifshits is working on algorithms and prototypes of new services at Yahoo! Research. Before that he was teaching university courses in the U.S., Germany, Russia and Estonia. He blogs at yurylifshits.com and publishes his teaching materials at yury.name/teaching. Education technology has become a busy space in recent years. With so many startups on the scene, it is easy to get lost. 1. The education system of the 20th century is built around institutions: schools, colleges, academies and universities. We've now seen the first online high schools (Keystone School), colleges (University of Phoenix, Kaplan University, The Open University, University of the People), certification programs (Alison.com), enterprise training programs (GlobalEnglish.com), art schools (AudioVisualAcademy.com) and test preparation programs (Top Test Prep, GrockIt, Knewton, RevolutionPrep, TutorJam, BrightStorm). 2. To build a new educational institution, one needs to assemble a lot of pieces. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7.

Home - Visual Thinking Strategies The Science of How Memory Works by Maria Popova What the four “slave” systems of the mind have to do with riding a bicycle. “Whatever becomes of [old memories], in the long intervals of consciousness?” In The Guardian of All Things: The Epic Story of Human Memory (public library) technology writer Michael S. Illustration from 'Neurocomic,' a graphic novel about how the brain works. One of the most astounding facts Malone points out is that memory — that is, the creation of memories — is the result of a biochemical reaction that takes place inside neurons, one particularly common among neurons responsible for our senses. One popular theory holds that short-term memory consists of four “slave” systems. Malone goes on to explore the inner workings of long-term memory — a substantially different beast, designed to keep our permanent mental record: Chemically, we have a pretty good idea how memories are encoded and retained in brain neurons. The Guardian of All Things is a fascinating read in its entirety. Donating = Loving

Notes sharing by students, for students Help your students help each other with our 24-hour peer-support network. As your students share and collaborate, their engagement and confidence will grow. Just invite your students to join their class on GradeGuru.com - they can start immediately using their existing facebook accounts or school email. Link to gradeguru.com from your LMS, or we'll do the simple integration for you. Learn more (pdf download) Facilitate peer-support, class communities and student collaboration to increase student engagement and retention. We host it, we integrate it and we implement it. [GradeGuru] creates critical bonds between students and allows them to build on each other's strengths in ways that raise the performance level of the entire class. ~ Noelle M. For student collaboration to be effective, the method must be intuitive, user-friendly and designed with students in mind. ~ Dr. 99 % Agree "Seeing the feedback and ratings on notes other students have posted has been helpful for studying purposes."

The Visual Leap - About Visual Thinking >> Home • About Visual Thinking About Visual Thinking Visual thinking, also called visual learning, is a proven method of organizing ideas graphically - with concept maps, mind maps and webs. Scientifically based research demonstrates that visual learning techniques improve memory, organization, critical thinking and planning. Visual thinking is an intuitive and easy-to-learn strategy that works for many academic and professional projects. Visual Leap programs use visual thinking software as a learning tool, and this software accelerates the learning process. According to studies conducted by the Institute for the Advancement of Research in Education, visual learning techniques improve: Test scores Writing Proficiency Long-term Retention Reading Comprehension Thinking and Learning Skills Visual thinking is intuitive. Visual thinking is easy to learn. Joseph D. 37% of people are visual-spatial learners. The Visual Leap will help you harness this asset.

Research findings shed light on brain's storage capacity and how memories are kept separate Researchers have long wondered if there is an upper limit to our capacity to store memories and how we manage to remember so many events without mixing up events that are very similar. To explore this issue, researchers at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology's (NTNU) Kavli Institute for Systems Neuroscience and Centre for Neural Computation and colleagues from the Czech Republic and Italy tested the ability of rats to remember a number of distinct but similar locations. Their findings are published in the 8 December edition of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. The brain creates and stores memories in small networks of brain cells, with the memories of events and places stored in a structure called the hippocampus. The researchers tested memory in seven laboratory rats by letting them run around in 11 distinct yet similar rooms over the course of two days.

Time on the Brain: How You Are Always Living In the Past, and Other Quirks of Perception I always knew we humans have a rather tenuous grip on the concept of time, but I never realized quite how tenuous it was until a couple of weeks ago, when I attended a conference on the nature of time organized by the Foundational Questions Institute. This meeting, even more than FQXi’s previous efforts, was a mashup of different disciplines: fundamental physics, philosophy, neuroscience, complexity theory. Crossing academic disciplines may be overrated, as physicist-blogger Sabine Hossenfelder has pointed out, but it sure is fun. Neuroscientist Kathleen McDermott of Washington University began by quoting famous memory researcher Endel Tulving, who called our ability to remember the past and to anticipate the future “mental time travel.” McDermott outlined the case of Patient K.C., who has even worse amnesia than the better-known H.M. on whom the film Memento was based. Tellingly, not only can he not recall the past, he can’t envision the future. Alas, they couldn’t.

Memory Improvement © VeerPRZEMYSLAW PRZYBYLSKI Use these techniques to improve your memory. The tools in this section help you to improve your memory. They help you both to remember facts accurately and to remember the structure of information. The tools are split into two sections. As with other mind tools, the more practice you give yourself with these techniques, the more effectively you will use them. Mnemonics 'Mnemonic' is another word for memory tool. The idea behind using mnemonics is to encode difficult-to-remember information in a way that is much easier to remember. Our brains evolved to code and interpret complex stimuli such as images, colors, structures, sounds, smells, tastes, touch, positions, emotions and language. Unfortunately, a lot of the information we have to remember in modern life is presented differently – as words printed on a page. This section of Mind Tools shows you how to use all the memory resources available to you to remember information in a highly efficient way.

100+ Awesome Open Courseware Links for Artists | ArtCareer.net Posted by Site Administrator in Learning Tools Nov 20th, 2008 By Kelsey Allen Whether you’re into art theory, studying ancient art or making art yourself, you can find a range of online courses and lectures that can help educate you on your field of interest. Introductory Courses Learn the basics from these courses geared towards the beginner. Introduction to Sculpture : This course will deal with issues central to modern sculpture like site, context, process, psychology and aesthetics as well as helping students to work with some more non-traditional materials. Images and Online Exhibits These museums and online exhibits are wonderful places to find free and public domain images for inspiration or scholarly art study . Smithsonian American Art Museum Online Exhibitions : The SAAM has a number of online exhibits that range from landscape painting to modern photography. Studio Arts Lectures and Seminars Theory and Advanced Study Technology Training Photography and Film Graphic Design and New Media

train-working-memory What is Working Memory? Can it Be Trained? By: Dr. Pascale Michelon You have prob­a­bly noticed the increas­ing amount of research and media cov­er­age focused on “work­ing mem­ory”. Work­ing mem­ory is the abil­ity to keep infor­ma­tion cur­rent in mind for a short period, while using this infor­ma­tion for the task at hand. Let’s take a few con­crete exam­ples to under­stand in which sit­u­a­tions work­ing mem­ory is used. Brain Exercises for the Weekend By: Alvaro Fernandez Har­riet Vines, Ph.D., an expe­ri­enced author and retired col­lege pro­fes­sor, sends us a few fun brain exer­cises to train our atten­tion and work­ing mem­ory (the abil­ity to keep infor­ma­tion cur­rent for a short period while using this infor­ma­tion). Say the days of the week back­wards, then in alpha­bet­i­cal order.Say the months of the year in alpha­bet­i­cal order. PS: Enjoy these 50 brain teasers to test your cog­ni­tive abil­ity. Free give-aways: Sandra Bullock’s Premonition and our Brain Fitness Center

Create an Explosive Cover with Precise Photo Manipulation Techniques In this tutorial, we're going to make a creative illustration in a style meant for a video game cover or sci-fi book cover. We'll create this with mostly photo manipulation techniques. With some cool Photoshop options you can turn all the photos you chose, into one stunning looking explosive cover. It's amazing, how easy this can be done, all you need is just a good idea and some solid basics in Photoshop. Final Image Preview Let's take a look at the image we'll be creating. Step 1 Open this picture of a masked woman. Start repairing the photo by copying some part of the right side of the mask, and applying it to the missing part of the left side. Step 2 Now that you have still selected this little piece, lower its Opacity just a touch. Step 3 Now grab the Eraser Tool (E), set the Master Diameter to about 12px, and Hardness at 90%. Step 4 If someone has problems with repairing pictures, I recommend just to leave the picture the way it was originally. Step 5 Step 6 Step 7 Step 8 Step 9 Step 10

A nap to recap: How reward, daytime sleep boost learning: Findings could benefit educators -- ScienceDaily A new study suggests that receiving rewards as you learn can help cement new facts and skills in your memory, particularly when combined with a daytime nap. The findings from the University of Geneva, to be published in the journal eLife, reveal that memories associated with a reward are preferentially reinforced by sleep. Even a short nap after a period of learning is beneficial. "Rewards may act as a kind of tag, sealing information in the brain during learning," says lead researcher Dr Kinga Igloi from the University of Geneva. "During sleep, that information is favourably consolidated over information associated with a low reward and is transferred to areas of the brain associated with long-term memory." "Our findings are relevant for understanding the devastating effects that lack of sleep can have on achievement," she says. Both groups' performance was better for highly rewarded picture pairs, but the sleep group performed better overall.

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